INclusion 2021 Agenda

INclusion 2021

Tuesday, February 23

(All session times are EST and subject to change.)

2:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

2021 Research Symposium: Pharmaceutical Graduate Education: Preparing Clinical and Translational Scientists

Join leaders in research training from colleges and schools of pharmacy for a virtual meeting focused on graduate and post-graduate training of outstanding pharmaceutical researchers and clinician scientists. This highly interactive symposium will address critical issues for preparing the next generation of clinical and translational scientists, including successful strategies for research-focused dual-degree programs, strong practices for recruitment and diversity, supporting high-quality mentoring, and sustaining students and innovative programs through the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Keynote Presentation: Kim L.R. Brouwer, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Associate Dean, William R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy
 

Wednesday, February 24

(All session times are EST and subject to change.)

2:00 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

2021 Research Symposium: Pharmaceutical Graduate Education: Preparing Clinical and Translational Scientists

See session description above.

Panel: Christopher R. Frei, Pharm.D., M.Sc., The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy
Yin Chen, Ph.D., The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy
L’Aurelle A. Johnson, Ph.D., University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy

Thursday, February 25

(All session times are EST and subject to change.)

3:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

New Deans ACPE Orientation

Board members and staff of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education will lead this interactive session to provide new deans with important insights into both Pharm.D. and continuing education program accreditation. Issues related to preparing for focused and comprehensive accreditation visits/reviews, substantive changes and related accreditation matters will be covered.

ACPE Staff

Friday, February 26

(All session times are EST and subject to change.)

11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

AACP New Deans Program

Experienced deans will facilitate discussions about leading a school/college of pharmacy, as well as AACP programs in areas including institutional research and effectiveness, leadership, research/scholarship, interprofessional education and advocacy. Additional materials for new deans are available in AACP Connect. Interim Deans and CEO Deans who have been in their roles for three years or less are invited to participate.

AACP Staff and Council of Deans Administrative Board

2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Connections and Conversations: CEO Deans

Join colleagues for an opportunity to share ideas, learn from each other’s challenges and successes of the past year, and make new connections to begin INclusion 2021. Connect with other CEO Deans while engaging in roundtable discussions on timely issues.

2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Connections and Conversations: Associate and Assistant Deans

Join colleagues for an opportunity to share ideas, learn from each other’s challenges and successes of the past year, and make new connections to begin INclusion 2021. Connect with other Assistant and Associate Deans while engaging in roundtable discussions on timely issues.

2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Connections and Conversations: Department Chairs

Join colleagues for an opportunity to share ideas, learn from each other’s challenges and successes of the past year, and make new connections to begin INclusion 2021. Connect with other Department Chairs while engaging in roundtable discussions on timely issues.

Monday, March 1

(All session times are EST and subject to change.)

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Keynote

Vision 2030: The Future of Health Care and Implications for Pharmacy Education and Training

Bill Gates once observed that humans “always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next ten.” In her keynote speech, Susan Dentzer will take that more change-driven, longer-term horizon and describe the likely evolution of health care between now and 2030 and beyond. Key themes include the entry of many new and nontraditional players into health care, including tech companies and retail chains like Walmart; sweeping digitization of almost all care aspects; tension between emergence of comprehensive care systems versus a consumer choice menu of “a la carte” care, driven in part by growing affordability concerns and cost pressures; and a focus on delivery of highly personalized precision medicine in increasingly “distributed” (i.e., non-facility-based) ways. Dentzer will discuss the implications of these trends for pharmacy and pharmacy education and describe challenges for the educational sector in preparing students and faculty for this new world.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the evolution of health care between now and 2030 and beyond.
  2. Discuss the implications of these trends for pharmacy and pharmacy education.
  3. Outline the challenges for the educational sector in preparing students and faculty for the future.

(Knowledge-based, 0581-0000-21-013-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Susan Dentzer, Ph.D., Senior Policy Fellow, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy

12:30 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

What's the End Goal? Professionalism or Professional Identity?

Professional identity formation is a complex and transformational process of internalizing a profession’s core values and beliefs. It requires intentional educational strategies that result in students thinking, acting and feeling like pharmacists upon graduation. The speakers will discuss the differences between professionalism and professional identity formation, and why fostering a strong professional identity should matter to the pharmacy profession, particularly as we transform practice. Participants will learn about supporting the evolution of professional identity formation in health professions education and educational approaches and activities that could be applied to pharmacy education.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Distinguish between professionalism and professional identity formation.
  2. Discuss whether professional identity formation should be the overarching goal in developing health professionals.
  3. Describe how they can support the professional identity formation of their students in their contexts.
  4. Outline pharmacy education's path forward in supporting strong professional identity formation in a time of practice change and transformation.

(Application-based, 0581-0000-21-017-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Yvonne Steinert, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Family Medicine; Director, Institute of Health Sciences Education; and Richard and Sylvia Cruess Chair in Medical Education, McGill University

1:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Open Hearing on AACP 2021-2024 Strategic Plan

Join Dr. Stuart Haines, AACP President-elect and Chair of the Strategic Planning Committee, for an update on this committee’s work to develop the strategic priorities for the 2021-2024 plan. Participate in the planning process with your questions, comments and suggestions to help set the priorities for AACP’s work over the next few years. Planning strategically is critically important in dealing with a post-pandemic world.

Moderator: Stuart T. Haines, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, BC-ADM, Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Director, Pharmacy Professional Development, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi

3:45 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Council of Faculties Forum

All members of the Council of Faculties are invited to participate in discussions on current and future council priorities.

Chair: Adam M. Persky, Ph.D., Professor, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

3:45 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Council of Deans Business Meeting

All members of the Council of Deans are invited to receive updates and participate in discussions regarding current and future council priorities.

Chair: Wanda T. Maldonado, Pharm.D., Dean, School of Pharmacy, University of Puerto Rico

Tuesday, March 2

(All session times are EST and subject to change.)

11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

A Research I University is Making Strides to Have Their Faculty Members be More Reflective of Their Students

U.S. higher education has struggled to increase the representation of women and underrepresented minorities, notably in the STEM fields, due to barriers during the recruitment and promotion & tenure processes. To address that issue, the University of Houston created the Center for ADVANCING UH Faculty Success with a $3.3 million National Science Foundation grant. The Center works to recruit, retain and promote women and women of color in the STEM fields by providing developmental opportunities and creating an infrastructure to facilitate work-life integration. Through broad participation, the programs have generated considerable growth in this area. By involving all stakeholders, the program has a far reach across campus. Strong leadership and a commitment to innovation through data driven research were key to the success seen to date. Dr. Henderson and Dr. Pitman will share details of their success across campus, and within the College of Pharmacy, as well as lessons learned along the way.

Erika Henderson, Ed.D., Associate Provost, Faculty Recruitment, Retention, Equity and Diversity, University of Houston; Paige Pitman, Pharm.D., MBA., R.Ph., Clinical Assistant Professor and Executive Associate Dean, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston

12:30 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Internationalization and Global Engagement: 2021 and Beyond

Global engagement has been a hallmark of higher education in the United States, as reflected by the recruitment of students, researchers and faculty from around the world, a dense web of international collaborations in education and research, and the global pre-eminence of American colleges and universities and the associated research ecosystem. Although schools’ interest in internationalization as a strategy to enhance institutional impact remains high, recent policy changes in the U.S. and the global COVID-19 pandemic have created uncertainty about the future of international engagement for U.S. schools. Dr. Helms will share her insights into the outlook for internationalization, using data on national trends that provide crucial context for pharmacy, and lead a discussion on mechanisms to enable successful interactions with international partners in education, research, service and practice.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe recent trends in internationalization and global engagement in higher education.
  2. Discuss how the global COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the future of international engagement at U.S. schools.
  3. Explain mechanisms to enable successful interactions with international partners in education, research, service and practice.

(Application-based, 0581-0000-21-016-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Robin Matross Helms, Ph.D., Assistant Vice President, Learning and Engagement, American Council on Education; David Steeb, Pharm.D., MPH, Assistant Professor and Director, Global Engagement, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

ALFP Debate #1

The 2020–2021 ALFP Fellows Cohort presents a debate on the topic "voluntary diversity committees can effectively drive change within institutions.” In true debate style, two teams of Fellows will present opposing sides of the issue. Opportunity for discussion, and questions and answers from the audience will be provided.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the use of professional debate arguing skills for application in leadership interactions.
  2. Assess the design, value and use of professional debate arguing in a team environment.
  3. Analyze the value and ramifications of voluntary diversity committees driving change within the institutions.

(Application-based, 0581-0000-21-008-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

2020-2021 ALFP Fellows Cohort; Moderator: Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Potential of Non-Traditional and Alternate Work Arrangements in Academic Pharmacy

Scholars and innovators have been exploring ways to improve productivity and faculty success, leading to increased job satisfaction. Ideas such as shorter work weeks, no meeting days, email limitations, and teleworking have been proposed and tested in various work environments. The Department Chair committee of the Council of Faculties has been charged with exploring the literature around non-traditional or alternate work arrangements and suggesting how these could be applied to higher education and to Academic pharmacy specifically. This session will present some of the preliminary findings of the committee, as well as gather suggestions and thoughts from participants on these and other topics. These perspectives will be included in the committee’s final report and white paper.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explore the potential of alternative work arrangements in academic pharmacy.
  2. Discuss strategies to improve overall productivity.
  3. Identify institutional and individual opportunities to improve wellness.

(Application-based, 0581-0000-21-015-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Judith L. DeLuca, Pharm.D., BCPS, Chair and Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Nesbitt School of Pharmacy, Wilkes University; Daniel R. Kennedy, Ph.D., Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Western New England University; Jennifer Lamberts, Ph.D., Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Ferris State University ; William A. Prescott Jr., Pharm.D., Chair and Clinical Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

ALFP Debate #2

The 2020–2021 ALFP Fellows Cohort presents a debate on the topic "academia's response to COVID-19 was a model for incident response to future pandemics.” In true debate style, two teams of Fellows will present opposing sides of the issue. Opportunity for discussion, and questions and answers from the audience will be provided.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the use of professional debate arguing skills for application in leadership interactions.
  2. Assess the design, value and use of professional debate arguing in a team environment.
  3. Analyze the value and ramifications of academia's response to COVID-19 as a model for incident response to future pandemics.

(Application-based, 0581-0000-21-009-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

2020-2021 ALFP Fellows Cohort; Moderator: Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

Wednesday, March 3

(All session times are EST and subject to change.)

11:00 a.m.–Noon

ACPE Organizational Update

This session will provide an update on ACPE activities. In addition, questions from the Academy will be solicited and discussed on topics related to ACPE.

Jan Engle, Pharm.D., PhD. (Hon), FAPhA, FCCP, FNAP, Executive Director, ACPE

12:30 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Hang Out the "Do Not Disturb" Sign: Work-Life Harmony in Progress

Originally coined in 1986, work-life balance continues to be an imperative labor force issue today. This presentation will examine (1) work-life balance trends/initiatives, (2) current research on the intersection and pull between work and life, and (3) the dramatic impact that current "working-from home" and "working during a pandemic" have had on our work-life balance.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Examine causes of work-life imbalance and trends associated with improving the harmony between work and non-work roles.
  2. Analyze recent work-life balance research and apply findings to work environments.
  3. Describe work-life harmony within current trends of working remotely.

(Application-based, 0581-0000-21-014-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Krystal L. Brue, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Business, Cameron University

1:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Microsessions: Leading Efforts in Diversity and Inclusion (Option 1 of 3)

Packing information and insight on a topic into a 10-minute segment, microsessions provide a brief overview of a topic through a 7-minute presentation and 3-minute question-and-answer period. These sessions are short and provide meeting attendees with the opportunity to hear a wide range of approaches to diversity and inclusion. Choose to watch presentations on one or more topics.

Moderator: Carla White, B.S., Associate Dean, Organizational Diversity and Inclusion, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Implicit Bias Training for Faculty, Staff, and Preceptors at a HealthCare Professional University

There is no “one and done” approach to training when it comes to reducing implicit biases, but rather a mindful commitment and desire for progress. This session describes a virtual strategy used to deliver implicit bias training to a broad audience of faculty, staff and preceptors at a health science university across multiple disciplines on two campuses.

Sally Arif, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCP, Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

Development of Diversity Perspectives

This session will describe a new initiative implemented titled "Diversity Perspectives." We will discuss the challenges, opportunities and lessons learned.

Suzanne Galal, Pharm.D., Professor, Pharmacy Practice, Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy, University of the Pacific

Bridging the Gap: Building Pillars for Success for Underrepresented Groups

Recognizing the gaps in equity and inclusion in Oklahoma for historically underrepresented groups, the University of Oklahoma developed and implemented a camp for pre-pharmacy students from diverse backgrounds. This camp has shown promising results in bridging the gap for these students as they apply for pharmacy school.

Jennifer L. Richardson, M.S. , Director, Recruitment and Admissions, Pharmacy Student Affairs, Colllege of Pharmacy, The University of Oklahoma

A Multi-Pronged Strategy to Enhance Diversity and Inclusion in a Metropolitan College of Pharmacy

This session will provide insights into a multi-pronged strategy used at the Touro College of Pharmacy (NY) for enhancing diversity and inclusion during recruitment, admission decisions and progression. We will also discuss our successes and challenges.

Heidi Fuchs, B.S., Assistant Dean for Admissions and Enrollment Management, College of Pharmacy, Touro College and University System

Diversity in Faculty and Graduate Student Recruitment and Retention

This program presents the highlights of our recent AJPE article on recruitment and retention of underrepresented minority students and faculty.

Heidi Fuchs, B.S., Assistant Dean for Admissions and Enrollment Management, College of Pharmacy, Touro College and University System

Attracting a Diverse Pharmacy Workforce During A Pandemic

This session will describe an approach for cultivating diverse student talent during a pandemic.

Carla Y. White, B.S. Pharm, Associate Dean Organizational Diversity and Inclusion, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Microsessions: Leading the Implementation of Online/Distance Learning for Didactic Courses (Option 2 of 3)

Packing information and insight on a topic into a 10-minute segment, microsessions provide a brief overview of a topic through a 7-minute presentation and 3-minute question-and-answer period. These sessions are short and provide meeting attendees with the opportunity to hear a wide range of approaches to online/distance learning. Choose to watch presentations on one or more topics.

Moderator: Kari L. Franson, Pharm.D., Ph.D., BCPP, Associate Dean for Academic & Student Affairs, Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California

Curricular Guidance Amidst the Pandemic. Do or Do Not. There is No Try.

The purpose of this session is to share the evolution of guidance provided to course coordinators as they restructured their didactic courses during the pandemic.

Helen Berlie, B.S., Pharm.D., CDE, BCACP, Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice, Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Wayne State University

Expanding Virtual Co-Curricular Opportunities

This session will describe strategies for expanding virtual co-curricular opportunities to fulfill key elements of ACPE Standards 3 and 4.

Laressa Bethishou, Pharm.D., APh, BCPS, Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice, Director of Co-Curriculum, School of Pharmacy, Chapman University

A Scheduling Defense to Zoom Fatigue: Developing a Hybrid Approach to Teaching that Promotes Wellnes

Virtual delivery of didactic education is the future, but "zoom-fatigue" severely limits student learning. This session will focus on an approach by the University of Maryland to incorporate limited synchronous activity at regular times across all courses in a class year.

Andrew Coop, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences and Associate Dean, Academic Affairs, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland

Building a Dynamic Education Continuity Hub to Support Faculty and Staff

During the rapid transition to online education delivery, we recognized the need to support faculty and staff to pivot to remote teaching. This session highlights the development and use of our dynamic Education Continuity Hub. Attendees will have the opportunity to experience the hub in real time.

Frank Fan, M.A.Sc., Educational Technology Specialist, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto 

Virtual vs. In-Person Case Conference: A Viable Alternative

This session will present how one school of pharmacy successfully transitioned from an in-person to virtual case conferences with the same cohort of students.

Alexis Lang, Pharm.D., M.S., Geriatrics/Community Pharmacy Resident, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California 

Optimizing Distance Learning: Policies that Benefit Both Sides of the Screen

Implementing policies to improve virtual learning is essential to maintain the highest level of education while remaining safe and compliant to distance requirements.

Jenna C. Sullivan, Pharm.D. Candidate 2022, College of Pharmacy, Medical University of South Carolina 

1:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Microsessions: Leading Innovative Approaches to Experiential Education (Option 3 of 3)

Packing information and insight on a topic into a 10-minute segment, microsessions provide a brief overview of a topic through a 7-minute presentation and 3-minute question-and-answer period. These sessions are short and provide meeting attendees with the opportunity to hear a wide range of approaches to experiential education. Choose to watch presentations on one or more topics.

Moderator: Craig D. Cox, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, Vice Chair, Experiential Programs and Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Jumpstart APPE Rotations with an APPE Masterclass

This year has been unpredictable and challenging, especially for pharmacy students preparing for APPE rotations amidst a pandemic. In order to  jumpstart rotations during these unprecedented times, the APPE Masterclass was developed to provide a two-week immersive experience to further develop student's practice-ready skills.

Danielle Kieck , Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice, Nesbitt School of Pharmacy, Wilkes University 

Development and Impact of Virtual Education to Support Transition to Remote Precepting

We will describe development, implementation and evaluation of virtual education resources to support preceptors during our switch to remote rotations during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Debbie Kwan, B.S. Pharm., M.S., Assistant Professor, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto 

Development of a Non-Direct Patient Care Virtual APPE Elective During COVID-19

This session will describe how a unique, virtual non-direct patient care APPE elective course was developed in only one week’s time due to the curricular gaps created by the coronavirus outbreak in 2020. Methods of implementation, outcomes, best practices and lessons learned will be shared.

Christina Mnatzaganian, Pharm.D., BCACP, APh, Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego 

Agile APPE: Delivering a Robust Rotation Remotely

This session will review the creation, deployment and assessment of a remote acute care APPE including the development of simulation sessions, as well as strategies to include PGY1 residents to further scale this model.

Pamela L. Smithburger, Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS, BCCCP, FCCM, FCCP, Associate Professor, Pharmacy and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh 

Rubber Band Plan-Stretching and Expanding Hospital IPPE Options in Challenging Times

Identifying enough hospital-IPPE rotations is challenging in normal times, but when circumstances decrease options creative measures are needed to ensure students continue to progress through experiential requirements. To meet the need, H-IPPE rotations were stretched and expanded by adding long-term care facilities, completing some objectives virtually and offering rotations beyond the summer months.

Lisa Vandervoort, Pharm.D., Clinical Instructor, Regional Coordinator, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida 

Best of Both Worlds: Virtual Opportunities for Hospital/Health System APPE

This microsession highlights Wilkes University Nesbitt School of Pharmacy’s best practice model for creating a virtual experience to support the hospital/health system APPE rotation. This practice model can be broken down into four key parts: Professional Development, Core Competencies, Onsite Component, and Emphasis on COVID-19.

Letitia N. Warunek, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice, Nesbitt School of Pharmacy, Wilkes University 

3:45 p.m.–4:45 p.m.

ALFP Debate #3

The 2020–2021 ALFP Fellows Cohort presents a debate on the topic "pharmacy school curricula should include additional entrepreneurship requirements to better prepare students to be the innovative practitioners our health system needs.” In true debate style, two teams of Fellows will present opposing sides of the issue. Opportunity for discussion, and questions and answers from the audience will be provided.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the use of professional debate arguing skills for application in leadership interactions.
  2. Assess the design, value and use of professional debate arguing in a team environment.
  3. Analyze the value and ramifications of pharmacy school curricula including additional entrepreneurship requirements to better prepare students to be innovative practitioners.

(Application-based, 0581-0000-21-010-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

2020–2021 ALFP Fellows Cohort; Moderator: Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

 

Thursday, March 4

(All session times are EST and subject to change.)

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program

Fee: $25

Noon-2:00 p.m.

Welcome, Rapid Fire Discussion with Breakout Sessions, with a Focus on COVID-19

3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

COVID-19: Addressing the Problem and Planning for the Future

While ACPE requires schools of pharmacies to have comprehensive policies and procedures that address potential systems failures, including technical, administrative and curricular failures (Standard 8.8), most universities and schools of pharmacies were ill-equipped to manage the COVID-19 pandemic. This program will present how a public university and a private university managed the pandemic from an administrative perspective. The program will highlight the various financial, HR and administrative policies that were created to address the pandemic at the university and health center perspectives. The program will also illustrate how administrative functions had to be managed from an on-site versus a remote perspective. The program will examine lessons learned and how the school of pharmacy continuity of operation plans can be improved.

Dale E. Rush, MPA, Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago
Mark Goggin, MBA, Senior Director of Operations, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences

Tuesday, March 9

Noon-2:00 p.m.

Welcome, Rapid Fire Discussion with Breakout Sessions, Administrative and Fiscal Topics

3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Strengthening the Leadership Pipeline Using Performance and Potential

In the development of leaders in pharmacy education, organizations may struggle with creating a strong pipeline for future talent across various levels. With many programs facing departures and vacancies from their talent pool, there is a cost to the organization in terms of time, energy and financial resources to re-evaluate the position, develop the search and selection process, identify the new individual for the role(s), and then allow them to acclimate to a new culture and/or a new set of responsibilities. When organizations develop a strong pipeline and succession plan, they are more likely to have a plan for both unexpected and anticipated departures.

David Fuentes, Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, EdD.c., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, College of Nursing, University of Portland