INvolve 2019 Programming

AACP Article
Friday, February 22nd

3:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

New Deans ACPE Orientation

By invitation only, pre-registration required through ACPE, no additional fee

Sandhill Crane, Second Floor

Board members and staff of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education will lead this interactive session to provide new deans with important insights into both Pharm.D. and continuing education program accreditation. Issues related to preparing for focused and comprehensive accreditation visits/reviews, substantive changes and related accreditation matters will be covered. A reception hosted by ACPE will follow the working session beginning at 5:00 p.m.

ACPE Staff

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

New Deans ACPE Orientation Reception

By invitation only, pre-registration required through ACPE, no additional fee

Snowy Egret, Second Floor

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

AACP Board of Directors Reception with ALFP & Special Guests

By invitation only

Oyster Catcher's Outdoor

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Research Symposium Reception

By invitation only

1823 Kitchen and Bar

Networking reception for “Engaging the Next-Gen Research Workforce: 2019 Research Symposium.”

Julie Johnson, Pharm.D., Dean and Distinguished Professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida

Saturday, February 23rd

9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Engaging the Next-Gen Research Workforce: 2019 Research Symposium

Separate registration required; $135 Session Registration; Discounted fee of $75 with INvolve Conference Registration; includes Friday reception, Saturday lunch, and one coffee break.

Audubon Ballroom D, First Floor

The 2019 Research Symposium will bring together leaders in research and training from colleges and schools of pharmacy to discuss opportunities and challenges in research training at pharmacy schools. Symposium topics will include engaging pharmacy students in research projects and strengthening the pipeline for pharmacy research, integrating basic and clinical sciences in pharmacy schools, the value of research experience for building professional competencies and more. Through a mix of presentations, panel discussion and open forums, symposium participants will share experience and ideas and seek to identify points of potential collaboration to advance pharmacy research training. Deans, department chairs and faculty involved or interested in expanding research training are encouraged to attend.

Julie Johnson, Pharm.D., Dean and Distinguished Professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida Panel Discussion: Victor Nizet, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego; Nick Hagemeier, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University; Panel Discussion: Silvia E. Rabionet, M.Ed., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Sociobehavioral and Administrative Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University; John Rimoldi, Ph.D., Professor of Medicinal Chemistry & Environmental Toxicology, Director of Research and Graduate Affairs in Biomolecular Sciences, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi; Erin Ulrich, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Social and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Drake University; Ola Ghoneim, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy and Physician Assistant Studies, University of Saint Joseph

10:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Research Symposium Morning Break

Audubon Ballroom D, First Floor

Coffee for symposium participants.

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Research Symposium Networking Lunch

Audubon Ballroom D, First Floor

Lunch for symposium participants.

Julie Johnson, Pharm.D., Dean and Distinguished Professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida

Noon–1:00 p.m.

AACP New Deans Program

Fee: Complimentary. Pre-registration required. Registration includes lunch.

White Ibis, First Floor

In order not to conflict with your attendance at the research symposium, this session will meet during lunch. Experienced deans will facilitate discussions about leading a school/college of pharmacy, as well as AACP programs in areas including institutional research and effectiveness, leadership, research/scholarship, interprofessional education and advocacy. Additional materials for new deans are available in AACP connect.

AACP Staff

2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Connections and Conversations: Assistant and Associate Deans

White Ibis, First Floor

Connect with other Assistant and Associate Deans while engaging in discussion on academic and faculty citizenship, as well as faculty and staff development. Further conversations with CEO Deans following the session are encouraged. Academic and Faculty Citizenship Faculty/Staff Development

2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Connections and Conversations: CEO Deans

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

Connect with other CEO Deans while engaging in discussion on interprofessional education.

Moderator: Evan T. Robinson, Ph.D., Dean and Associate Provost for Academic Affairs, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Western New England University

2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Connections and Conversations: Department Chairs

Sandhill Crane, Second Floor

Participants attending the department chairs networking session will engage with other attendees using a discussion protocol approach in order to share experiences and collective recommendations regarding work-related challenges that impact departments in schools and colleges of pharmacy.

Moderator: Seena L. Haines, PharmD, BCACP, FAPhA, FASHP, FCCP, FNAP, BC-ADM, CDE, Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi

3:45 p.m.–4:45 p.m.

Special INvolve 2019 Kick-off: From Awareness to Action to Innovation: Empowering Leaders Through Inclusive Excellence

Open to all registered meeting attendees.

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

This session focuses on empowering leaders to be innovative around issues of diversity, equity and inclusion. Some topics that will be covered include: the importance of diversity in the new economy and how we can work together to make its promise a reality; why there seems to be so much talk of diversity-themed change and yet so little results; and best practices for advancing diversity and inclusion efforts within an organization or institution. Leveraging national data, introspective stories and the pragmatic voice that can only come from having led on diversity, equity and inclusion at all levels of leadership, this lecture will empower, celebrate, and inspire hope in all of those that attend.

Damon A. Williams, Ph.D., Chief Catalyst, Center for Strategic Diversity Leadership and Social Innovation Senior Scholar and Innovation Fellow; Wisconsin Equity, and Inclusion Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

CEO Deans Networking Reception

By Invitation only

Snowy Egret, Second Floor

Private reception for CEO Deans only.

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Welcome Reception

All registered guests are invited; Name Badge Required

Oystercatcher's Hammock Deck & Poolside

Sunday, February 24th

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Private Schools CEO Deans Breakfast

White Ibis, First Floor

Gather with your colleagues to discuss issues that impact private schools.

Moderators: Michael A. Crouch, Pharm.D., BCPS, FASHP, Fred E. McWhorter Dean and Professor, McWhorter School of Pharmacy, Samford University

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

INvolve 2019 Keynote: Involvement. Potential. Culture. Excellence.

Audubon Ballroom, First Floor

Data-informed leadership involves science and art. To lead we can choose not only to know the facts and trends, but also how to engage our employees in conscious development of a positive culture while inspiring them to reach their (and our) potential. Drawing on experience, as well as the research of Maxwell, Brown, and Borton, the presenter will engage the audience in interactive discussion.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Explore how leadership excellence can be inspired by conscious focus on intangibles that support data-informed decisions.
2. Address and discern what a culture of engagement is and how fostering it may help individuals, including the leader him/herself to reach explore one's potential.
3. Describe how excellence differs from perfection and how excellence can grow infinitely.
4. Describe how transformational leadership necessitates involvement.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-001-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Richanne C. Mankey, Ph.D., President, Defiance College

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Networking and Beverage Break

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Leading the Generations Colliding in the Workplace

Audubon Ballroom D-F, First Floor

The work environment is becoming an increasingly more diverse setting and one of the areas of diversity that is sometime overlooked is generational. We now have five generations working side-by-side. But whether this multigenerational workforce is satisfied and productive or challenging and stressful can relate back to you, the leader. The workplace is filled with different perspectives, motivations, and expectations. To work effectively and efficiently, to increase productivity and quality, one needs to understand generational characteristics and learn how to use them effectively. This session will explore these differences and provide strategies to assist department chairs in helping individuals and tailoring their approaches for maximum effect.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Identify challenges in leading the multigenerational workforce as it relates to communication styles, adapting to change, and views on work-life balance.
2. Discuss how to promote a work culture free of ageism.
3. Provide strategies to support the unique needs of multigenerational pharmacy faculty.
4. Encourage thinking analytically and creatively about how to better understand pharmacy faculty.
5. Determine assessment measures to consider when assessing the impact of faculty generational diversity initiatives.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-002-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Willette S. Burnham-Williams, PhD, Assistant Professor, University Chief Diversity Officer & Title IX Coordinator, Department of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Medical University of South Carolina

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

ALFP Debate #1

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

The ALFP Fellows 2018-2019 Cohort presents a debate on the topic “Pharmacy schools should be run like a business.” In true debate style, two teams of Fellows will present opposing sides of the issue. Opportunity for discussion, and questions and answers from the audience will be provided.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Evaluate the use of professional debate arguing skills for application in leadership interactions.
2. Assess the design, value and use of professional debate arguing in a team environment.
3. Analyze the value and ramifications of pharmacy schools being operated like a business.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-003-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

ALFP Fellows 2018–2019 Cohort;
Moderator: Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

10:45 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Optimizing and Aligning Promotion and Tenure Criteria, Position Descriptions, Annual Evaluations, and Workload Allocation

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

Promotion and tenure criteria, position descriptions, annual evaluations, workload, and allocation of effort have been strongly linked to faculty job satisfaction and retention and are emphasized on the AACP Faculty Survey. However, optimizing performance on these factors to suit needs of faculty and administration can be challenging. This program will describe systematic, data-driven interventions taken by one pharmacy program to improve faculty job satisfaction, while advancing strategic initiatives, and share outcomes of these interventions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Anticipate strengths in optimizing and aligning factors related to faculty evaluations and workload at your institution.
2. Anticipate potential challenges in optimizing and aligning factors related to faculty evaluations and workload at your institution.
3. Identify systematic interventions you could take to optimize or align factors related to faculty evaluations and workload at your institution.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-004-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Robert D. Beckett, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Director of the Drug Information Center, College of Pharmacy, Natural and Health Sciences, Manchester University;
Teresa (Teri) A. Beam, Ph.D. Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacogenomics, College of Pharmacy, Natural and Health Sciences, Manchester University

10:45 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

National Pharmacy Awareness Campaign

Audubon Ballroom D-F, First Floor

Meet with AACP staff and leaders from communications agency RP3 to learn about the national campaign, which launched in October 2018. The team will present examples of media outreach, news features, paid social media and video placement. They will share the latest campaign materials and plans for campaign expansion. Attendees will have an opportunity to engage in a lively conversation, and to share their experiences with the campaign.

Stephanie S. Fouch, Senior Advisor, Outreach and Communications, AACP;
Holly Filipiak, MBA, Account Supervisor, RP3 Agency;
Dan Sweet, Director of Public Relations, RP3 Agency

Noon–1:45 p.m.

Town Hall Meeting and Lunch

Audubon Pavilion, Outdoor

Agenda:  

NACDS Foundation Update 
PharmCAS and Priority #1 Updates - Libby Ross
Priority #2 Updates: National Campaign: Status, Phase II Media, Analytics - Stephanie Saunders Fouch
Overview of the Leadership Development Committee - Steve Cutler
Update on Environmental Scan of Opioid Related Activities - Dorothy Farrell

Moderator: David D. Allen, R.Ph., Ph.D., FASHP, FNAP, FAPhA Dean and Professor Executive Director of the Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

ALFP Debate #2

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

The ALFP Fellows 2018-2019 Cohort presents a debate on the topic “Quality interprofessional pharmacy education always includes physicians or student physicians.” In true debate style, two teams of Fellows will present opposing sides of the issue. Opportunity for discussion, and questions and answers from the audience will be provided.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Evaluate the use of professional debate arguing skills for application in leadership interactions.
2. Assess the design, value and use of professional debate arguing in a team environment.
3. Analyze the value and ramifications of physicians or student physicians in interprofessional pharmacy education.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-005-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

ALFP Fellows 2018–2019 Cohort;
Moderator: Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Leadership Evaluation: By Leaders and of Leaders

Audubon Ballroom D-F, First Floor

Leaders are often in the position of evaluating others in both formative and summative manners, as well as getting feedback in similar ways. But how do leaders know if they are effective and successful? This session will address how leaders evaluate others with the majority of time spent discussing how leaders are evaluated from those to whom they report as well as by those who report to them.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Explain the value of leadership evaluation.
2. Explain the opportunities and challenges of 360 degree leadership evaluations.
3. Explain the formal versus informal leadership evaluation.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-006-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Evan T. Robinson, Ph.D., Dean and Associate Provost for Academic Affairs, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Western New England University

 

Monday, February 25th

6:00 a.m.– 7:00 a.m.

Sunrise Yoga

Audubon Promenade, First Floor

Wake up with the sun. Energize your body, mind and spirit in this punctual one hour practice that energizes your day and harmonizes your life. Lead by Seena L. Haines, PharmD, BCACP, FAPhA, FASHP, FCCP, FNAP, BC-ADM, CDE, The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy

7:00 a.m.– 8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Standards 2016: A Review After Five Semesters

Audubon Ballroom, First Floor

Since fall 2017, Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) programs have been evaluated against the Accreditation Standards and Key Elements for the Professional Programs in Pharmacy Leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy Degree (“Standards 2016”). Since then all actions by the ACPE Board had been guided by these standards and key elements. This 90-minute session will provide an overview of learnings and interpretations of Standards 2016. Insights will be provided into how programs are addressing the Co-Curriculum, Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA), Interprofessional Education (IPE), and Preceptor Development. The session will also include case discussions based upon situations encountered during comprehensive on-site evaluations. An update will be included on emerging shifts in higher education accreditation policies of the United States Department of Education (USDE) and the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), and the potential impacts such changes will have on ACPE-accredited Pharm.D. programs.

J. Gregory Boyer, Ph.D., Assistant Executive Director and Director, Professional Degree Program Accreditation, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education;
Mary E. Kiersma, Pharm.D., Ph.D. Assistant Director of Professional Degree Program Accreditation, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Networking and Beverage Break

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Research Misconduct: How Do We Avoid It?

Audubon Ballroom D-F, First Floor

Dr. Ranjini Ambalavanar from HHS Office of Research Integrity (ORI) will discuss research misconduct regulations, describe the institution’s responsibilities during research misconduct proceedings, and share insights into recognizing and mitigating potential research misconduct and best laboratory practices that help to avoid misconduct in research. Examples from closed ORI misconduct cases will be discussed.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Define research misconduct and explain how ORI work with institutions and the scientists when an allegation of research misconduct is made.
2. Recognize questionable research practices vs research misconduct.
3. Describe the institution’s responsibilities in promoting research integrity and handling allegations of research misconduct.
4. Identify red flags that could indicate research misconduct.
5. Understand interpersonal, institutional and professional responsibilities in overall ethical conduct in research.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-007-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Ranjini Ambalavanar, Ph.D., Acting Director, Division of Investigative Oversight, Office of Research Integrity, OPHS

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

ALFP Debate #3

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

The ALFP Fellows 2018-2019 Cohort presents a debate on the topic “Academic Freedom remains a valuable cornerstone of educational institutions.” In true debate style, two teams of Fellows will present opposing sides of the issue. Opportunity for discussion, and questions and answers from the audience will be provided.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Evaluate the use of professional debate arguing skills for application in leadership interactions.
2. Assess the design, value and use of professional debate arguing in a team environment.
3. Analyze the value and ramifications of academic freedom at educational institutions.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-008-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

ALFP Fellows 2018–2019 Cohort;
Moderator: Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Microsession: Student Leadership

White Ibis, First Floor

Packing information and insight on a topic into a 10-minute segment, microsessions provide a brief overview of a topic through a 7-minute presentation and 3-minute question-and-answer period. These sessions are short and provide meeting attendees with the opportunity to hear a wide range of approaches to educational leadership. Choose to stay in one room the whole time, or move around to hear a little bit on each topic.

Moderator: Kristin Janke, Ph.D., Professor and Director, Wulling Center for Innovation and Scholarship in Pharmacy Education, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota

11:15 a.m.

Leadership Advisory Boards: Helping Students Request and Give Leadership Advice

In “instructor-free” sessions, students present an active leadership challenge and other students (members of their “board”) provide consultation, advice and coaching based on an assigned leadership framework. Roles, expectations, preparation work and documentation requirements will be discussed, along with student response to this activity, which is in its third year.

Kristin Janke, Ph.D., Professor and Director, Wulling Center for Innovation and Scholarship in Pharmacy Education, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota

11:25 a.m.

Developing Diplomatic PharmaLeaders for the 21st Century: Leading to Leave a Legacy

Describe the various spectrum of how student pharmacists become leaders of the near future. Provide examples of being an ambassador of the distant campus and transmogrify a board of executive members into future pharmacy leaders.

Anthony M. Casapao, Pharm.D., MPH, Clinical Assistant Professor, Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida

11:35 a.m.

Tracking and Assessment of Student Leadership Development

Every semester, students complete an online plan of study including quantitative and reflective questions on affective domain competencies. Leadership development is assessed through organization involvement and experiences, and faculty advisors provide feedback and monitor their advisees over time.

Lisa Lebovitz, JD, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and Assessment, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland

11:45 a.m.

Mentoring Students for Leadership and Interprofessional Collaboration: A Longitudinal Program Emphasizing Professional Development and Comfort With Uncertainty

Mentors get to know students as fellow humans with personal, academic and professional lives, and provide advice for integrating these dimensions. This session summarizes how a successful mentoring program was embedded within an interprofessional education curriculum to emphasize leadership values: comfort with uncertainty, decision making, accountability, self-advocacy and change agility.

Jennifer Danielson, Pharm.D., MBA, CDE, Associate Professor, Director, Introductory Practice Experiential Education, Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Washington

11:55 a.m.

Expanding Student Leadership and Mentorship Opportunities Through a Layered System Designed to Combat Admissions Challenges

A successful program for increasing applicant pools and decreasing barriers for first-generation and underrepresented students was expanded into a layered model.   Mentorship trainings and toolkits were adapted and pairings were expanded in a “family-tree” fashion to parsimoniously include mentorship relationships across high school, undergraduate, Pharm.D. student and faculty populations.

Jeremy Hughes, Pharm.D., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Enrollment, Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, California Health Sciences University

12:05 p.m.

Weaving Leadership Concepts Within the Curriculum and Co-Curriculum: A Collaborative Course Stream Approach

Creating a truly integrated leadership curriculum must include intentional collaboration across courses and co-curricular activities. This session discusses the key highlights and lessons learned from the development and implementation of a leadership course stream on the two campuses of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

Stephanie N. Kiser, R.Ph., Director of Rural Health and Wellness, Clinical Assistant Professor, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Asheville Campus

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Microsession: Preparing Students for Corporate Structures

Audubon Ballroom D-F, First Floor

Packing information and insight on a topic into a 10-minute segment, microsessions provide a brief overview of a topic through a 7-minute presentation and 3-minute question-and-answer period. These sessions are short and provide meeting attendees with the opportunity to hear a wide range of approaches to educational leadership. Choose to stay in one room the whole time, or move around to hear a little bit on each topic.

Moderator: David Fuentes,Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, Executive Associate Dean, Department Chair and Professor, Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, California Health Sciences University

11:15 a.m.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution: How a Unique Experiential Model Gives Pharmacy Graduates an Edge as They Enter 2020’s Changed Workplace

The World Economic Forum (WEF) predicts the increase in artificial intelligence will change the workplace skills needed from teamwork and active-listening to creativity and emotional intelligence. This talk will explore whether co-op workterms increase these job-readiness skills and exposure to job needs in entrepreneurial workplaces, policy-influential organizations and corporate environments.

Nancy Waite, Pharm.D., Associate Director, Professor, School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo

11:25 a.m.

Career Navigation: Multi-faceted Approach to Student Pharmacist Career Development

Student pharmacists' career preparedness is important to cultivate throughout the student experience. The implementation of the Career Navigation program provides students with the tools to navigate various career opportunities through various forums, interactions with employers and peer-mentoring.

Cherokee Layson-Wolf, Pharm.D., FAPhA, Associate Dean for Student Affairs, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland

11:35 a.m.

Crafting a Creative Company Culture

The Pharmacy Business and Entrepreneurship elective develops corporate skills including communication, team building and entrepreneurship through the development of a comprehensive business plan. Additionally, students are taught strategic planning principles and execution for a campus side flu clinic culminating with the students participating in the delivery of the flu clinic.

Katherine S. O'Neal, Pharm.D., MBA, Associate Professor, Department of Clinical and Administrative Sciences; Eric J. Johnson, CPA, MBA, Senior Associate Dean for Administration and Finance, College of Pharmacy, The University of Oklahoma

11:45 a.m.

Preparing Student Pharmacists to Grasp Cultural-specific Complementary and Integrative Medicine

This session will describe a research project that aimed to prepare student pharmacists for corporate culture and the corresponding effort for them to grasp Latin American complementary and integrative health topics.

Paul Boylan, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Larkin University

11:55 a.m.

Innovative Solutions to Medication Safety Concerns

Innovation is an important component within The Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) outcomes. The purpose of the innovation assignment is to describe how processes were used across courses to improve baseline curricular exposure to innovation in response to low student self-identification of innovation within co-curricular activity tracking.

Marie A. Roke Thomas, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Wilkes University

12:05 p.m.

Preparing Practical Learners and Thinkers Through Situational Awareness and Process Education

This session focuses on process education and teaching practical steps to perform in high clinical/social functions. Pharmacy students do not have the experience to apply clinical and social aspects of care immediately after learning about a disease state. Situational awareness and process education prepare them for APPE and high-performing contexts.

David Fuentes, Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, Executive Associate Dean, Department Chair and Professor, Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, California Health Sciences University

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Microsession: Regional Campuses

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

Packing information and insight on a topic into a 10-minute segment, microsessions provide a brief overview of a topic through a 7-minute presentation and 3-minute question-and-answer period. These sessions are short and provide meeting attendees with the opportunity to hear a wide range of approaches to educational leadership. Choose to stay in one room the whole time, or move around to hear a little bit on each topic.

Moderator: Paul O. Gubbins, Pharm.D., Associate Dean, Vice Chair and Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Administration, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri – Kansas City

11:15 a.m.

One School, Two Campuses: Integration of University and Regional Culture Into the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy Asheville Campus

UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy embraces a “one school, two campus” philosophy that leverages the unique opportunities for interprofessional, patient-centered, rural practice, education and research on the Asheville Campus. This micro-session describes the intentional creation of regional campus culture based upon the values of community, collaboration and creativity.

Mollie Ashe Scott, PharmD., BCACP, CPP, FASHP, Clinical Associate Professor, Regional Associate Dean, Asheville, Clinical Associate Professor, Family Medicine, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina

11:25 a.m.

Remote Control: Channeling Leadership Across Campuses During Implementation of an Integrated Curriculum

This session describes leadership opportunities for faculty at distance campuses during the implementation of a new integrated curriculum. It also highlights the importance of input from distance faculty for appropriate delivery of a new curriculum at distance sites.

Karen Whalen, Pharm.D., BCPS, FAPhA, Assistant Dean for Clinical Education, Clinical Professor, Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida

11:35 a.m.

Student Organization Annual Retreat (SOAR): A Leadership Development Event Serving All Campuses

The Student Organization Annual Retreat (SOAR) is a student-driven leadership development retreat hosted on a rotating basis at each campus of the University of Florida College of Pharmacy. The two primary goals are: 1) enhance Pharm.D. students' leadership skills and 2) foster communication among student leaders across the multiple campuses.

Shauna Buring, Pharm.D., Associate Dean for Professional Education, Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida

11:45 a.m.

FLIP Institute: Increasing Pharmacy School Interest and Raising Regional Campus Awareness Within the Community

This microsession will focus on the development and implementation of a program designed to showcase a regional campus to local high school students and flip the perceptions regarding the pharmacy profession. Successes, challenges and student feedback will be shared to help the audience implement a program at their respective institutions.

Ryan E. Owens, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor, Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Wingate University

11:55 a.m.

Maintaining Student Progress When A Natural Disaster Strikes A Regional Campus

Multi-campus colleges coordinate instruction and assessments in order for students at each site to progress simultaneously. When a regional campus is disrupted, creative programs must be initiated to maintain student learning. This program describes ongoing concerns and adjustments to bring all students into educational alignment.

Robert McGory, Pharm.D., M.S., Associate Dean, Professional Program College of Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University

12:05 p.m.

Promoting Engagement Between Pharmacy Students at Different Campuses

This session will describe policies and events that have been used for promoting engagement between students at a school with two campuses.

Greene Shepherd, Pharm.D., Clinical Professor and Vice Chair, Practice Advancement and Clinical Education, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina

12:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Networking Lunch

Audubon Pavilion, Outdoor

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Leveraging Digital Strategies to Engage Prospective Students

Audubon Ballroom D-F, First Floor

Pharmacy colleges and schools are facing a challenging and highly competitive admissions environment. Institutions must maximize digital tools and web-based strategies to effectively reach and engage prospective students in the pipeline. Attendees will learn how to develop tailored, online content that will resonate with Gen Z and Millennial students. Presenters will identify the essential elements of a successful social media campaign that will yield optimum reach and results. The session will also provide insights and recommendations around successful marketing strategies from a national perspective, so attendees can explore ways to best blend innovative and traditional recruitment methods into a cohesive campaign.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Explain a social media strategy for the school/college of pharmacy.
2. Describe digital and in-person recruitment methods to best appeal to millennials and Gen Z students.
3. Recognize successful marketing strategies from a national perspective that can be incorporated into a cohesive campaign.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-009-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Margarita DiVall, Pharm.D., M.Ed., BCPS, Clinical Professor Department of Practice and Health System Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Northeastern University
Emily Burns M.Ed., Digital Managing Director, Youth Marketing Connection (YMC)

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Leadership Now: Creating Leadership Development Opportunities in our Colleges and Schools for All Faculty

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

Regardless of position or title, all pharmacy faculty are expected to inspire and enable learners, peers and their community to achieve goals rooted in the common good through efforts in teaching, service and scholarship. Developing faculty to meet these expectations requires a solid foundation in the principles, knowledge and skills of leadership development. Programming external and experiences internal to one’s school may aid in this development. Participants will review foundations in faculty leadership development and identify resources they may need from their school and ways to develop leadership on their own through their work responsibilities.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Provide a definition of faculty leadership development.
2. Describe guiding principles for faculty leadership development.
3. Identify 2-3 areas for focused leadership development for any faculty person, regardless of position or title.
4. Name at least one existing opportunity for leadership development and describe methods to maximize its impact.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-010-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Kristin K. Janke, Ph.D., Director, Wulling Center for Innovation & Scholarship in Pharmacy Education Professor, Pharmaceutical Care & Health Systems, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota;
Andrew P. Traynor, Pharm.D., BCPS, Chair and Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice Director, PGY1 Pharmacy Residency Program School of Pharmacy, Concordia University Wisconsin;

3:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Networking and Beverage Break

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

AACP Council of Deans Business Meeting

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

All members of the Council of Deans are invited to receive updates and participate in discussions regarding current and future council priorities.

Chair: Evan T. Robinson, Ph.D., Dean and Associate Provost for Academic Affairs, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Western New England University

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Faculties Forum

Audubon Ballroom D-F, First Floor

All members of the Council of Faculties are invited to participate in discussion on current and future council priorities.

Chair: Daniel A. Brazeau, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Pharmacy, Marshall University

Tuesday, February 26th

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

7:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

8:00 a.m.–Noon

Legal Issues Commonly Faced in Colleges of Pharmacy

Audubon Ballroom A-C, First Floor

This session will provide an overview of some key legal issues frequently faced by academic pharmacy administrators. An interactive law session with application-based cases will be delivered by content experts. Faculty currently or considering administrative positions are encouraged to attend. This session is designed to be appropriate for all disciplines and experience.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:
1. Introduce and discuss current legal issues in higher education.
2. Discuss nationwide research efforts profiling academic administrator’s perceptions, preparedness and professional development needs.
3. Evaluate, discuss and assess legal issues facing higher education administrators in categories identified as important by previous research efforts.
4. Formulate strategies for continued legal preparedness of academic administrators in schools of pharmacy.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-011-L04-P, 3.50 Contact Hour)

David D. Allen, R.Ph., Ph.D., FASHP, FNAP, FAPhA Dean and Professor, Executive Director, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi;
Diane B. Ginsburg, Ph.D., M.S., R.Ph., FASHP, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs and Clinical Professor, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin; Richard Kasmer, Pharm.D., J.D., Dean, Vice President, and Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Northeast Ohio Medical University;
Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate;

9:30 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Networking and Beverage Break

Audubon Foyer, First Floor

11:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

AFO SIG

White Ibis, First Floor

This session is an open and interactive discussion of the Operational Peers Survey to identify peers based on organizational structure and key differences, and to learn best practices among those peers. There will be a panel discussion by schools that have recently gone through the accreditation process to identify organizational and program changes, and financial costs of complying with new ACPE standards. There will also be an interactive case study presentation on the aspects of managing positive change. Learning objectives include understanding how to create positive change with key takeaways to apply to future and existing projects.