Opioid-Related Activities

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If your College or School of Pharmacy is conducting opioid-related activities that are not included in this data, please fill out this form and it will be reviewed for addition. Please read the FAQ and submit questions to opioid@aacp.org.

Colleges and schools of pharmacy must stay current with many aspects of the opioid overdose crisis (e.g., opioid medications, pain management, practice issues, laws and regulations) to provide complete student pharmacist education and training. This data is to inform the pharmacy profession and other stakeholders as to the efforts of colleges and schools of pharmacy to address the current crisis.

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View submitted activities below. Use the filters and search to narrow your results. Click on a result to reveal contact info as well as associated categories and tags.

Categories and Tags were developed and assigned to activities by AACP staff members with the assistance of volunteer members of the AACP Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group.  

School Public or Private Program Structure State Opioid Activity Summary Contact Person Type of Activity Tag(s)
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI A faculty member at the URI college of pharmacy was invited to create competencies on contract with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in the fall of 2017, and in the Spring of 2018, was asked to write the pharmacy chapter connected with the competencies as part of an interdisciplinary team. Additionally, as the first pharmacist to sit on the Board of Directors for the Association of Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA), this faculty member was asked to update competencies and old project chapters. – The University of Rhode Island jefbratberg@uri.edu Education, Advocacy IPE, Non-profit Funding, Associations/Societies, Other Health Professionals, Government Funding, Guidelines
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI In 2015, the URI college of pharmacy along with multiple collaborators, started to conduct the Maximizing Opioid Safety with Naloxone (MOON) study. The goal of this study is to maximize opioid safety with naloxone. It also plans to gather more information about the public's perception of opioid safety, naloxone distribution, and the use of the pharmacy as an integral site for public health intervention. – The University of Rhode Island jefbratberg@uri.edu Research For-profit Partner(s), Naloxone, Health-Systems, Community-Based Research, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Health-Systems, Government Funding, Practice-Based Research
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI The MOON+ is a collaborative intervention program that begin in June of 2018. It combines elements from both the Maximizing Opioid Safety with Naloxone (MOON) and RESPOND interventions to support pharmacy staff and patient safety. This will include online training, naloxone information tear-off sheets, patient education materials, bag stuffers, and an opioid safety algorithm and checklist. – The University of Rhode Island jefbratberg@uri.edu Research, Practice Naloxone, Health-Systems, Practice-Based Research, Community-Based Research, Government Funding, Multiple School Collaboration, Pharmacists, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Harm Reduction
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI In 2017, the URI college of pharmacy began a 4-year study to develop a Collaborative Practice Agreement (CPA) for Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) between Rhode Island's nonprofit Opioid Treatment Program (OTP), CODAC Behavioral Health, multiple pharmacy chains, and Genoa Healthcare. This was the first time a CPA for MAT was available from the state's department of health. – The University of Rhode Island jefbratberg@uri.edu Research, Practice Government Funding, MAT, CPA, For-profit Partner(s), OBOT, Non-profit Partner(s), Pharmacists
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI In the Fall of 2015, a faculty member with the URI college of pharmacy was appointed to the Rhode Island Governor's Task force and was one of the 4 principal architects of their strategic plan. This faculty member is also a co-chair of the naloxone workgroup as well as a member of the harm reduction committee. The committee has proposed and passed legislation and regulations related to harm reduction, restricting acute opioid prescriptions, co-prescribing naloxone, expanding MAT access, and much more. The committee will unveil their 5-year follow-up plan in October 2018. – The University of Rhode Island jefbratberg@uri.edu Service, Advocacy Harm Reduction, Law Enforcement, Legislation, State Government, Naloxone, Opioid Stewardship, State Board of Pharmacy
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI In the Spring of 2018, a student pharmacist and faculty member from the URI college of pharmacy obtained IRB approval to conduct and record a focus group of community pharmacists on their impressions and real-world applicability and logistics of audio-assisted prescription caps with messaging on opioid safety and naloxone. In order to conduct the study, NobleQ manufactured 500 caps to be made available. This project was presented at the 2018 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Midyear Clinical Meeting. – The University of Rhode Island jefbratberg@uri.edu Research For-profit Partner(s), Practice-Based Research, Student Pharmacists, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, Community Practice
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI In the Spring of 2016, a faculty member from the URI college of pharmacy proposed, edited, and published a special issue of the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association (JAPHA) on opioid safety and naloxone. – The University of Rhode Island jefbratberg@uri.edu Education, Service Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Naloxone, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Harm Reduction
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI In 2016, the URI college of pharmacy began work with a physician researcher to increase the available of naloxone to the public via a "NaloxBox." After additional collaboration with the Rhode Island School of Design, Rhode Island Overdose Prevention Task Force, and Naloxone and Overdose Prevention Education Program of Rhode Island (NOPERI), 200 boxes are now being manufactured in Rhode Island to be distributed nationwide. – The University of Rhode Island jefbratberg@uri.edu Service Naloxone, Government Funding, Health Departments, Multiple School Collaboration, Other Health Professionals, IPP, Harm Reduction
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI The URI College of Pharmacy clinical practice-based faculty developed the Opioid Misuse Prevention Program. The 3-h curriculum provides 3–4 interactive educational sessions, including a focus on medication safety, signs and symptoms and risk factors for opioid misuse and withdrawal, opioid overdose identification and response, and local treatment and recovery resources for adolescents and their families and friends. The program uses roleplay, case scenarios, and the Frayer Model to help guide student learning and knowledge application to real-world examples. In the Spring of 2016, a 3 hour version of this program was conducted in 8th and 9th grade classes. Analyzing of the results from this secondary school program began in 2017. – The University of Rhode Island matson@uri.edu Education, Research, Service Secondary School Students, Didactic, Non-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Funding, Public Outreach
The University of Rhode Island Public Traditional RI In the Summer of 2017, a faculty member from the URI College of Pharmacy proposed changing opioid prescribing regulations to require naloxone co-prescribing. These regulations were approved June 2018. This led to massive increases in the number of naloxone dispensing as well as the number of naloxone prescribers. Additionally, this faculty member drafted and edited web-based content to facilitate implementation of these guidelines. – The University of Rhode Island jefbratberg@uri.edu Service, Advocacy Naloxone, Health Departments, Legislation, Opioid Prescribing, Guidelines, Harm Reduction
Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science Private Traditional IL During the 2017-2018 academic year, the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science chapter of APhA-ASHP Generation Rx partnered with Liv4Lali, an opioid awareness organization, to conduct campus wide naloxone training. Approximately 75 student pharmacists and faculty members were trained during this session. – Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science khyati.kotak@rosalindfranklin.edu Education Generation RX, Naloxone, Non-profit Partner(s), Student Pharmacists, University Wide Community, Associations/Societies, Internal Funding,
Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science Private Traditional IL For the past 3 years, the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science chapter of APhA-ASP Generation Rx has collaborated with the Lake County Health Department and the Lake County Sheriff's office, to host DEA's national drug take-back days (NDTBD). The student pharmacists have used these days to provide education regarding proper drugs and needle disposal while conducting some blood pressure screenings. – Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science khyati.kotak@rosalindfranklin.edu Service Law Enforcement, Generation RX, Health Departments, Drug-Take Back, Student Pharmacists
Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science Private Traditional IL A collaborative research project is being conducted by a faculty advisor of APhA-ASP along with some additional pharmacy faculty, the Lake County Health Department, the Lake County Sheriff's office, and the Solid Waste Agency of Lake County (SWALCO) to analyze the amount and type of opioids collected at various drug take back locations within the county. The purpose of this project is to assess the effectiveness of this drug take-back program that runs throughout the year. It also gives insight on where the habit forming drugs are prescribed, where they are dispensed, where they are returned, and what is the overall naloxone use pattern within the county. – Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science khyati.kotak@rosalindfranklin.edu Research Law Enforcement, Health Departments, Associations/Societies, Drug-Take Back, Naloxone, Drug Disposal, Opioid Prescribing, Opioid Trends
MCPHS University–Boston Private Traditional MA In 2016, MCPHS University - Boston implemented a new curriculum called Advanced Practice Management (APM). It is a comprehensive, three-component capstone course incorporating contemporary pharmacy practice in the Community, Institutional and Management/Entrepreneurship settings. This third professional year course utilizes didactic, laboratory and group project assignments to instill Entrustable Professional Activities (EPA) in student pharmacists. A key partner for this program that has been essential to the delivery of this program is End Mass Overdose, Inc., a Boston-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that targets the opioid epidemic and implements pharmacy-based strategies, solutions, and crisis interventions to improve public health outcomes. This program has evolved over the years and now includes student pharmacists educating and teaching Tufts dental students on how to deliver naloxone via multiple delivery devices, along with opioid and pain management education. – MCPHS University–Boston joseph.ferullo@mcphs.edu Education Non-profit Partner(s), Student Pharmacists, IPE, Naloxone, Other Health Profession Students, Health Departments, Didactic, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
MCPHS University–Boston Private Traditional MA MCPHS University provides free training to students, faculty, and staff on “how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose." The training sessions, which began in 2016, occur once per week during the fall and spring semesters during the student activity period. This training teaches those attending how to recognize when someone may be having an opioid overdose, how to administer naloxone, how to use rescue breathing, and what to say when calling 911. This training has been attended by over 2,500 students, faculty, and staff at MCPHS University. – MCPHS University–Boston francis.melaragni@mcphs.edu; mariakostka-rokosz@mcphs.edu Education Pharmacists, University Wide Community, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, Harm Reduction
MCPHS University–Boston Private Traditional MA MCPHS University developed and validated a 23-question survey to assess the readiness of Massachusetts pharmacists to counsel patients on how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose. The goal of the study was to determine how ready Massachusetts pharmacists were to counsel patients on how to recognize and opioid overdose and make effective use of naloxone and rescue breathing to help reverse the overdose. Eighty Massachusetts pharmacies that had a standing order to dispense naloxone were visited. The main conclusion of the research was that the study findings should bring awareness to the shortfalls of pharmacists’ knowledge of naloxone and opioid overdose to Massachusetts pharmacy schools, pharmacists, and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Recommendations were to increase and implement naloxone and opioid overdose training to student pharmacists so that as practicing pharmacists they can help to reduce opioid overdose deaths in the community. In addition, hands-on training or additional interactive training modules would be beneficial to ensure that practicing pharmacists are adequately prepared to play the essential role they have on this critical matter. – MCPHS University–Boston francis.melaragni@mcphs.edu; mariakostka-rokosz@mcphs.edu Research Survey Research, Pharmacists, Naloxone, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Internal Funding
MCPHS University–Boston Private Traditional MA In the Spring of 2018, MCPHS University worked with a local pharmacy and distributed naloxone to 75 student pharmacists in Boston and Worcester. These student pharmacists attended training on how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose and agreed to carry naloxone with them. – MCPHS University–Boston francis.melaragni@mcphs.edu; mariakostka-rokosz@mcphs.edu Education, Service Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, For-profit Funding, For-profit Partner(s), Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Community Practice, Harm Reduction
MCPHS University–Boston Private Traditional MA In the Spring of 2018, MCPHS University distributed “on-site” drug disposal pouches to students, faculty, and seniors in Winchester, Massachusetts, and allowed all recipients to respond anonymously about the drug name and quantity disposed. After the project was conducted, MCPHS came to the conclusion that a new and more focused approach is needed in dispensing on-site pouches as most of the drugs disposed were not opioids. A new, more focused campaign has been developed as a result of this project. – MCPHS University–Boston francis.melaragni@mcphs.edu; mariakostka-rokosz@mcphs.edu Service Drug Disposal, For-profit Funding, University Wide Community
MCPHS University–Boston Private Traditional MA MCPHS University holds an Annual Opioid Symposium to educate the university community. The symposium began in 2015 and each event includes external guest panelists who describe their work in the opioid epidemic and student poster and podium presentations. Attendees have also been trained on rescue breathing and naloxone administration during one of the symposia and drug disposal pouches were distributed at another symposia. – MCPHS University–Boston francis.melaragni@mcphs.edu; mariakostka-rokosz@mcphs.edu Education Drug Disposal, Naloxone, University Wide Community, Public Outreach, Harm Reduction
MCPHS University–Boston Private Traditional MA MCPHS University offers an annual elective course regarding pain and addition. The "Common Threads: Pain and Addiction" course is taught by a Pharmacist Specialist in Pain Management and is offered to third-professional year student pharmacists. The three objectives of this course are to discuss principles related to chronic pain management and appropriate use of opioid therapy, discuss assessment and management of opioid use disorders and overdose and to provide hands-on training for various naloxone formulations. – MCPHS University–Boston francis.melaragni@mcphs.edu; mariakostka-rokosz@mcphs.edu Education Didactic, Pain/Pain Management, Naloxone, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Substance Use Disorder, Pharmacists, Student Pharmacists
Texas A&M University Public Traditional TX In the Spring of 2018, a Texas A&M student pharmacist-led program formed Operation Naloxone. Student pharmacists receive training on naloxone and then go out into their communities, both on campus and off campus, to train others how to recognize opioid overdose and use naloxone to reverse it. Over 400 people have been trained with Operation Naloxone. – Texas A&M University jalonzo@pharmacy.tamhsc.edu Education, Service Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Non-profit Partner(s), Public Outreach, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Internal Funding, Harm Reduction
Texas A&M University Public Traditional TX In the Fall of 2017, Texas A&M College of Pharmacy successfully facilitated an Interprofessional Education (IPE) Day where students from the college of pharmacy, along with other health professional students, met with clinical students from San Jose Clinic in Houston to discuss the national opioid crisis. The discussion objectives were to learn from, with, and about other health care students and identify effective ways to communicate with an interprofessional education (IPE) team about opioid patients. Participants included 109 student pharmacists, 7 pharmacy interns from three different colleges of pharmacy, 1 pharmacy resident, 1 medical student, 4 nursing students and 3 public health students with 3 faculty members from pharmacy and 2 faculty members from nursing. Faculty facilitated discussions with various case scenarios and the students from pharmacy, nursing and medicine shared and taught one another their best practices, method of care and clinical insights. – Texas A&M University pho@pharmacy.tamhsc.edu Education IPE, Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students
Texas A&M University Public Traditional TX Texas A&M University provides support for student pharmacists to attend the annual American Pharmacists Association (APhA) Institute on Alcoholism and Drug Dependencies. The institute provides emotional support and encouragement for student pharmacists who are struggling with or who have family members who are actively engaged in substance use and abuse. – Texas A&M University divy@tamhsc.edu Education Associations/Societies, Substance Use Disorder, Student Pharmacists
Texas A&M University Public Traditional TX Texas A&M University offers an Integrated Pharmacotherapy (IPT) course in opioid management in the second-professional year of the curriculum." – Texas A&M University Hutchison@tamhsc.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management
South Dakota State University Public Traditional SD In 2018, South Dakota State University implemented a three-part research and education project on opioid misuse prevention in North Dakota and South Dakota. One part of the project is Youth Programming. The project will conduct Botvin Life Skills Training in middle schools. To complement this, "This Is Not About Drugs", a media-based approach to opioid use prevention, will be utilized. Additionally, 4-H county agents will receive training on these programs and will deliver local programming. – South Dakota State University Chamika.HawkinsTaylor@sdstate.edu Education Secondary School Students, Substance Use Disorder, Public Outreach, Government Funding
South Dakota State University Public Traditional SD In 2018, South Dakota State University implemented a three-part research and education project on opioid misuse prevention North Dakota and South Dakota. One part of this project is Public Health Campaigns. These educational campaigns on opioid awareness will be targeted to farm and ranch families using newsletters, radio, television, and webinars. – South Dakota State University Not provided Education Public Outreach, Substance Use Disorder, Government Funding
South Dakota State University Public Traditional SD In 2018, South Dakota State University implemented a three-part research and education project on opioid misuse prevention in North Dakota and South Dakota. One part of this project is the Opioid Use in Rural Dakotas Conference. These conferences raise awareness of opioid misuse vulnerability in farm and ranch families and will be hosted in North Dakota and South Dakota. The plan for these conferences is to bring in a national speaker and have breakout sessions for health professionals to discuss response to the opioid epidemic. – South Dakota State University Not provided Education, Service Substance Use Disorder, Other Health Professionals, Pharmacists, Government Funding
South Dakota State University Public Traditional SD A South Dakota State University clinical pharmacy faculty member was part of an interdisciplinary group at a clinic that revised the controlled substance agreements. This included the addition of access to the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP), urine drug screens, use of an opioid risk assessment tool and the patient Electronic Medical Record (EMR). The pharmacist is also actively reviewing patients who are receiving opioid medications. – South Dakota State University Deidra.VanGilder@sdstate.edu Practice PDMP, IPP, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Ambulatory Care Practice
South Dakota State University Public Traditional SD Starting work in 2014, a South Dakota State University clinical faculty member has written an article with a resident on the opioid addiction trends in the state and nation for a special edition of South Dakota Medicine. – South Dakota State University Jeremy.Daniel@avera.org Research, Service Opioid Trends, Pharmacy Residents, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), IPE, Opioid Prescribing
South Dakota State University Public Traditional SD South Dakota State University has implemented a variety of curriculum initiatives to educate student pharmacists on opioids, pain management and opioid alternatives, and opioid overdose management. These efforts include pharmaceutical sciences, pharmacy practice, and social/administrative pharmacy sciences content. Instruction starts with understanding the chemistry and mechanism of action of opioids and opioid antagonists. Content later in the curriculum focuses on overdose management and opioid addiction treatment. Some specific examples of curricular activities include approximately two hours of class/laboratory time discussing opioid addiction, intoxication and withdrawal and a patient case with an opioid prescription, calculation of morphine equivalent dose, screening for naloxone, and patient counseling points (in the course “Public Health and Wellness”); discussion of the use of opioids and opioid alternatives in patient management (in the Pharmacotherapeutics course sequence); discussion of the signs, symptoms and treatment of opioid overdoses and an opioid overdose simulation using a human patient simulator (in the Toxicology course); discussion of drug diversion and a presentation from the Health Professions Assistance Program (in the Pharmacy Practice course sequence); and aspects of controlled substances law and the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (in the Pharmacy Law and the Pharmacy Practice course series). An elective course "Drugs of Abuse and Addiction," which discusses aspects of opioid addiction and addiction treatment, is also offered in the Pharm.D. program. – South Dakota State University Teresa.Seefeldt@sdstate.edu Education Didactic, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Pain/Pain Management, PDMP, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists
South Dakota State University Public Traditional SD The APhA-ASP chapter at South Dakota State University participates in the Generation Rx program. Through this program, the chapter has held several events to educate students and the public about prescription drug abuse, including opioids. The most recent activity, beginning in August 2018, involved the distribution of the medication disposal product Dispose Rx to patients attending health fairs. The goal of this project is to help patients properly dispose of prescription opioids and decrease the potential for drug diversion. Other activities conducted by the APhA-ASP chapter include presentations to students and faculty by the South Dakota Attorney General, a drug diversion officer from the Department of Criminal Investigation, and a representative from the South Dakota Health Professions Assistance Program. The chapter sends a student to the APhA Institute on Alcoholism and Drug Dependencies annually and the student attendee shares what they have learned with the chapter members. The school has invited presenters from the APhA Institute on Alcoholism and Drug Dependencies to speak to the student chapter for the past three years. – South Dakota State University Teresa.Seefeldt@sdstate.edu Education, Service Generation RX, Substance Use Disorder, Drug Disposal, Associations/Societies, For-profit Partner(s), Student Pharmacists, Public Outreach
South Dakota State University Public Traditional SD A member of the South Dakota State University Ambulatory Care faculty and student pharmacists on the Ambulatory Care APPE work with an interdisciplinary pain team to recommend non-opioid medications (where appropriate), design opioid tapers, and recommend naloxone for patients. The pharmacist and student pharmacist also ensure that urine drug screens are performed, that a recent search of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program database is on file, that an opioid treatment agreement is on file, and that the patient is not on concomitant benzodiazepines. They also review the patient's history for a history of illicit substance use or other factors that may increase the risk of overdose. To date, they have met with 36 unique patients over the past year in a multidisciplinary setting for an intensive, 2-hour appointment. Pain sources vary but commonly include cervical and lumbar spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, and various radiculopathies/neuropathies. This team has helped over 35 patients. – South Dakota State University Joseph.Berendse@va.gov Education, Practice Ambulatory Care Practice, PDMP, Federal Government, Experiential, Naloxone, Opioid Prescribing, Pain/Pain Management, Experiential, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Opioid Stewardship, Harm Reduction
University of the Pacific Private Accelerated CA The University of the Pacific collaborated with the San Joaquin Department of Public Health in Fall 2018 to distribute Narcan to Medicare beneficiaries during community outreach events. Patients will be screened by pharmacy interns under the supervision of a faculty pharmacist preceptor for their risk of an opioid overdose and those at risk will be given a two-dose box of Narcan after being trained on its use. – University of the Pacific rpatel@pacific.edu; mwalberg@pacific.edu Service Naloxone, Public Outreach, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Health Departments, Non-profit Partner(s), Harm Reduction, Student Pharmacists
Duquesne University Private Traditional PA Duquesne University School of Pharmacy sponsors a Substance Use Disorder Awareness Program in January of each year that is required for all of its first-professional year students. The purpose of this eight-hour program is to ensure that student pharmacists are introduced to the disease model of addiction and the neuroscience behind it, are able to recognize signs and symptoms of the disorder, gain awareness of peer recovery networks and the referral process, and become familiar with the types of treatment programs that are available and how they support recovery. This is accomplished through a variety of invited speakers who are experts in the field and represent local, state, and national organizations. These include representatives from the Board of Pharmacy, Department of State, peer recovery networks, substance use disorder treatment and recovery programs, and pharmacists in recovery. A special session that is dedicated to School of Pharmacy faculty is offered every 3 to 5 years. All School of Pharmacy faculty and staff are required to attend this professional development session as well as well as approximately 200 student pharmacists. – Duquesne University astle@duq.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Student Pharmacists, Associations/Societies, State Government, IPP, State Board of Pharmacy, For-profit Partner(s), Didactic, Impaired Health Professionals, Other Faculty
Duquesne University Private Traditional PA Since 2016, approximately 50 third-professional year student pharmacists, who are enrolled in the School of Pharmacy Community Engaged Learning course, participate in the City of Pittsburgh Recovery Walk held each September. The purpose of the Recovery Walk is to celebrate the many paths to recovery and to eliminate the stigma associated with individuals suffering from substance use disorders. In 2018, the Walk attracted over one thousand participants. Representatives from over 25 non-profit and for-profit organizations dedicated to recovery efforts were present. The School of Pharmacy partnered with the Allegheny County Health Department to provide information on naloxone rescue and to distribute Narcan Nasal Spray kits to attendees upon request. The School of Pharmacy sponsored a second booth to provide attendees with information on Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) including naltrexone, suboxone, methadone, disulfiram, and acamprosate. Student pharmacists held posters (or story boards) along the walking route that provided walkers with information regarding the nature of substance use disorders and the hope that there is for recovery. – Duquesne University astle@duq.edu Service Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Health Departments, Public Outreach, MAT, Non-profit Partner(s), For-profit Partner(s), State Government, Associations/Societies, Naloxone, Harm Reduction
Duquesne University Private Traditional PA Through a community-engagement learning course that overlaps in part with introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs), Duquesne University School of Pharmacy third-professional year student pharmacists gain familiarity with harm reduction strategies and naloxone rescue devices. Representatives from the local DEA field office and the Allegheny County Health Department provide student pharmacists with insight and information regarding the extent and impact of the opioid crisis, particularly in the local area. Student pharmacists also gain familiarity with the State of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Health Department naloxone standing orders and are provided hands-on training with naloxone rescue devices and patient education counseling information. In the first several offerings of this outreach, student pharmacists enrolled in this course were required to visit a minimum of two community pharmacies to ensure that pharmacists were familiar with the naloxone standing order, how to administer naloxone, and how to counsel patients and caregivers/family members. Given that the majority of community pharmacies in the area are now well-versed with naloxone and its distribution, student pharmacists in subsequent offerings of this course are now required to counsel a minimum of two patients or their caregivers/family members as to its use. As part of the assessments for this course, students submit journals that are comprised of personal reflections regarding their experiences. It is estimated that over 300 pharmacies in the area were provided outreach regarding the naloxone standing order. It is also estimated that over 650 patients or their family/friends were provided information on naloxone rescue and its administration. – Duquesne University astle@duq.edu Education Law Enforcement, Health Departments, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Community-Based Research, Harm Reduction
Duquesne University Private Traditional PA Duquesne University second-professional year student pharmacists of the weekday pathway program and third-professional year student pharmacists of the weekend pathway program participate in a class advocacy and professional development trip to Washington, D.C. in the fall semester. Student pharmacists visit legislators on Capitol Hill to advocate on behalf of the profession and their patients regarding a number of health policy issues. The current opioid crisis has prompted students over the past two years to focus on the roles that pharmacists can play in mitigating the current crisis. In 2016, 147 student pharmacists, 9 pharmacy faculty and staff, and 13 law school students conducted 39 House and Senate office visits. In 2017, 176 student pharmacists, 9 pharmacy faculty and staff, and 16 law school students conducted 50 House and Senate office visits. – Duquesne University astle@duq.edu Education, Advocacy Associations/Societies, Student Pharmacists, For-profit Funding, IPE, Non-profit Partner(s), Didactic
Duquesne University Private Traditional PA Duquesne University third-professional year student pharmacists enrolled in a Community Engaged Learning course are required to participate in educational outreach endeavors. One such option is participation in educational outreach to local area middle and high schools to deliver programming surrounding substance use disorders. The primary intent of this program, entitled the Effects of Drug of Abuse on the Brain, is preventive in nature. It provides middle school and high school-aged students with factual information regarding how drugs of abuse hijack the brain. It is based in neuroscience with up-to-date information gleaned from NIDA and SAMHSA. In 2017, a total of 61 student pharmacists participated in 24 middle and high school visits. Over 1,300 students were impacted. – Duquesne University astle@duq.edu Education Secondary School Students, Public Outreach, Non-profit Partner(s), Didactic, Substance Use Disorder, Internal Funding, Student Pharmacists
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK In August of 2018, the University of Oklahoma formed a "Pediatric Opioid Working Group." This committee is composed of faculty from the Departments of Pediatrics and Family Medicine (OU College of Medicine) and OU College of Pharmacy. It focuses on efforts to decrease opioids in children and adolescents. – The University of Oklahoma peter-johnson@ouhsc.edu Service IPP, Opioid Stewardship
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK The Advocacy Committee of the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) has developed a position statement focused on safe and practical use of opioids in children. Several sections of this position statement will focus on strategies to reduce opioids in children. The statement will be published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics, which is the journal of PPAG. – The University of Oklahoma matson@uri.edu Advocacy Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK The University of Oklahoma formed a multi-disciplinary initiative consisting of faculty from the OU College of Medicine (Dept. of Urology and Anesthesiology), members of The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center’s (CHO) Pain Management Team, and the OU College of Pharmacy. The purpose is to reduce the opioid exposure in children following urologic procedures at CHO and increase patient safety. – The University of Oklahoma Cassandra-duncan@ouhsc.edu Practice Other Health Professionals, Pain/Pain Management, Other Faculty, IPP, Pharmacists, Opioid Prescribing, Health-Systems
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK A University of Oklahoma Faculty member presented at the 2018 ACCP Global Conference on Clinical Pharmacy. The presentation was “It All Adds up: Adjuvants and Multimodal Pain Management Strategies for Acute Pain in Pediatric Patients.” The focus of the presentation was on the utilization of adjunct medication for acute pain to reduce opioid exposure in children. – The University of Oklahoma Peter-johnson@ouhsc.edu Education Pain/Pain Management, Pharmacists, Continuing Education
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK University of Oklahoma Faculty members from the OU College of Medicine and the OU College of Pharmacy are working together on a research project that focuses on the use of a local anesthetic (ropivacaine) via OnQ pumps to decrease opioid exposure in children status-post cardiac surgery. – The University of Oklahoma Courtney-ranallo@ouhsc.edu Research Other Faculty, Pain/Pain Management, Practice-Based Research
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK The University of Oklahoma's clinical pharmacy in Tulsa combats the opioid crisis by only filling narcotic prescriptions for physicians in the clinic or ones previously in the clinic that are now in the pain management clinic. They do not accept any narcotic prescriptions from outside of the clinic or the pain management clinic. – The University of Oklahoma jillshadid@ouhsc.edu Practice Opioid Stewardship, Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK The University of Oklahoma's Pharmacists Care Center registered its pharmacy with the DEA as an official “take back” facility in May 2018. A consumer take-back box was placed in the lobby of the pharmacy for patients to return unused medication. Additionally, a fourth-professional year student pharmacist developed handout brochures on opioid safety and naloxone usage, which are currently handed out to patients receiving opioid medications. – The University of Oklahoma bryan-ticer@ouhsc.edu Education, Service Drug-Take Back, Naloxone, Health Departments, Law Enforcement, Student Pharmacists, Public Outreach, Harm Reduction
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK A University of Oklahoma faculty member conducts pharmacology lectures for both the college of pharmacy and the college of dentistry. These lectures discuss how the latest opioid epidemic arose from health care professionals prescribing more opioids than necessary or prescribing opioids when non-opioid analgesic options were safer and equally efficacious. The goal is for the dental students to think carefully about when they prescribe opioids for their patients and for the student pharmacists to proactively advise clinicians and patients when opioid prescriptions are appropriate and when equi-analgesic options exist. – The University of Oklahoma kelly-standifer@ouhsc.edu Education Didactic, Opioid Prescribing, Student Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management, Opioid Stewardship, Other Health Profession Students
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK A University of Oklahoma faculty member conducts lectures on addiction for third-professional year student pharmacists. The lectures discuss the pharmacology of medications used to treat various addictions as well as the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) or the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSA) regarding opioids and other drugs of abuse nationally and in the state of Oklahoma, including overdose deaths and use among different age groups. The lectures emphasize the importance and success of drug treatment programs that include both behavioral and pharmacological therapies. – The University of Oklahoma Not provided Education Substance Use Disorder, Student Pharmacists, Opioid Trends, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK Pharmacy Management Consultants (PMC) is a department of the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy which assists the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) manage the Medicaid pharmacy benefit for the state. PMC has worked with OHCA for over 20 years. During that time it has performed many functions related to opioids. PMC has designed and implemented changes to the pharmacy benefit structure aimed at reducing misuse and abuse of opioids, managed the pharmacy lock-in program (a program which restricts patients with potential misuse to certain prescribers and pharmacies for their controlled substance access), and performed scholarly research. – The University of Oklahoma shellie-keast@ouhsc.edu Research, Service Government Funding, For-profit Partner(s), Multiple School Collaboration, For-profit Funding, Health Departments, Opioid Stewardship, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK In the Fall of 2017, a University of Oklahoma faculty member became involved in a research study called Reduce Opioid Prescribing through Education and Support (ROPES). The first phase of the study, ROPES-1, involved structured interviews with primary care physicians associated with the Oklahoma Physicians Resource/Research Network, a primary care practice-based research network, to identify the challenges experienced in striving to reduce opioid prescribing and, in particular, the difficulties that may arise in consultations with patients who make inappropriate requests for opioid medications and current strategies used by physicians to deal with such requests. That same faculty member is also involved in ROPES-3, a third phase of the study, to (a) finalize a toolkit for physicians and patients regarding safer and better opioid therapy, (b) implement the toolkit in a pilot study, and (c) measure change in opioid prescribing, practice-level care processes, and physician and patient experiences with the toolkit. – The University of Oklahoma lourdes-planas@ouhsc.edu Research Government Funding, Other Faculty, Opioid Prescribing, Practice-Based Research, IPP, Other Health Professionals
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK The University of Oklahoma has received funding from April 2018 to March 2021 for a research project to study the epidemiology and safety of long-term opioid use among elderly individuals. Both student pharmacists and graduate students at the University of Mississippi are involved in the project. – The University of Oklahoma yiyang@olemiss.edu Research Government Funding, Multiple School Collaboration
The University of Oklahoma Public Traditional OK In 2017, a University of Oklahoma faculty member added a project to an existing elective course to help address the national opioid epidemic. Each student group was required to develop a community service project plan to address the opioid epidemic in the nation; each community project plan had to include: 1) a brief description of the opioid epidemic as a public health concern in the United States; 2) a description of the problem at the local level; and 3) a plan as to how pharmacists can work together with others in the health care team and community to address the opioid crisis. – The University of Oklahoma yiyang@olemiss.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO The St. Louis College of Pharmacy offers multiple courses in Pharmacology and Drug Action. In the principles of drug action course offered to first-professional year student pharmacists, a faculty member conducts a lecture titled "Drugs of Abuse." Opioids are included in the drugs discussed, including their mechanism of action, potential for addiction, the current problems their use is posing and the consequences. In the principles of toxicology elective course offered to first-professional, second-professional, and third-professional year student pharmacists, the same faculty member further discusses this topic, having students present cases that they have found in the literature and having pharmacists from a health-system discuss overdose cases from their medical emergency room. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy jasmina.profirovic@stlcop.edu Education Didactic, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Pharmacists, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO Starting September 2018, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health will have access to providing naloxone to any person who needs it (i.e., patient, family member, friend) at no cost. While this medication is directly dispensed by a nurse, education about how to use the product will be provided by a pharmacist. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy Scott.Coon@stlcop.edu Education, Practice Health Departments, Naloxone, Public Outreach, Other Health Professionals, Pharmacists, IPP, Harm Reduction
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO As part of the required public health class in the first-professional year at the St. Louis College of Pharmacy, student pharmacists and faculty discuss the opioid epidemic in multiple lectures (pharmacovigilance, Healthy People 2020, health disparities). There is regular discussion on new research and scholarship found in many articles regarding opioids. Additionally, there are semester-long projects where student pharmacist create research proposals. Previous project topics have included opioid epidemic related topics. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy stephanie.lukas@stlcop.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO Expecting to begin in early 2019, the St. Louis College of Pharmacy has been working with the St. Louis County Department of Public Health on a proposal to evaluate the impact of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) prescriber reports on Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) prescribing for Substance Use Disorder in Missouri. The overarching goal is to increase the number of buprenorphine-waivered providers practicing in primary care within the state of Missouri. The first aim of this project is to design and disseminate a report for prescribers within the St. Louis County PDMP that shows quarterly prescribing patterns of controlled substances and educates providers on best practices for the evaluation and management of Substance Use Disorder. The second aim of this project is to evaluate the overall impact on buprenorphine prescribing rates and the number of buprenorphine-waivered providers in the counties who receive the intervention (targeted education on MAT for Opioid Use Disorder [OUD]) compared to those who did not receive the intervention. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy Scott.Coon@stlcop.edu Research Health Departments, Associations/Societies, MAT, Buprenorphine, Substance Use Disorder, PDMP, Other Health Professionals, Practice-Based Research, Opioid Prescribing
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO The St. Louis College of Pharmacy has a 5-week Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) elective rotation research project. This is a cross-sectional study on opioid-related admissions to hospitals within the BJC HealthCare System. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy taewhan.park@stlcop.edu Research Experiential, Opioid Trends, Student Pharmacists, Health-Systems
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO A St. Louis College of Pharmacy faculty member has included treatment of Substance Use Disorder in a pregnancy lecture. This faculty member started a pilot service in the summer 2014 and this has expanded to a full-time independent center as of September 2016. This member helped to develop this center with another physician due to the need in the community and number of patients referred for high-risk obstetrics service. This prompted the faculty member to include this topic in the lecture since 2015. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy aforinash@stlcop.edu Education Experiential, Substance Use Disorder, Student Pharmacists, IPP, Non-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Funding, Other Health Professionals, Health-Systems, MAT, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Buprenorphine
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO A St. Louis College of Pharmacy faculty member is part of the Women and Infants Substance Help (WISH) Center which primary provides obstetric and substance abuse care for pregnant women. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) student pharmacists participate in this clinic as a part of the rotation and are there 2 half-days per week – St. Louis College of Pharmacy Not provided Practice Substance Use Disorder, Didactic, Student Pharmacists,
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO The St. Louis College of Pharmacy requires student pharmacists to take the Pain Management Lecture which provides a basic overview of opioids and reversal agents. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy Golden.Peters@stlcop.edu Education Pain/Pain Management, Didactic, Student Pharmacists
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO Added in 2018, the St. Louis College of Pharmacy offers a lecture and discussion section to the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) Community Care orientation that is completed on the first day of the rotation. The purpose of the lecture and discussion is to review the naloxone standing order and encourage student pharmacists to discuss site policies and procedures with their preceptors. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy ngattas@stlcop.edu Education Experiential, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Didactic
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO Beginning in April 2017, the St. Louis College of Pharmacy helps with the "Community Pharmacy Naloxone Expansion" portion of the Missouri Opioid State Targeted Response Grant. It helps educate pharmacists and pharmacy technicians about the standing order for naloxone in Missouri as well as how to educate patients on how to start the conversation about and the proper use of naloxone. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy amy.tiemeier@stlcop.edu Education Pharmacists, Naloxone, Government Funding, Non-profit Partner(s), Multiple School Collaboration, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
St. Louis College of Pharmacy Private Traditional MO The St. Louis College of Pharmacy maintains a website with information on the permanent medication disposal drop boxes in the area. A faculty member is the current president of the Missouri Prescription Pill and Drug Disposal non-profit group which supports medication disposal in police stations. The college started partnering with the city in 2011 to do annual door-to-door drug take-backs in senior living facilities for individuals who could not access national drug takeback days. – St. Louis College of Pharmacy amy.tiemeier@stlcop.edu Service Drug-Take Back, Drug Disposal, Non-profit Partner(s), Law Enforcement, Government Funding, State Government
MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester Private Accelerated MA MCPHS University - Worcester/Manchester hosts an annual interprofessional education (IPE) day, which started in 2013. In 2017 and 2018, the focus of this day has been on the topic of the opioid crisis with naloxone administration device training. Students worked together to discuss the opioid crisis and faculty facilitators led large group discussions about factors that have contributed to the crisis and what all professions can do to mitigate the crisis. An overview of the Prescription Monitoring Drug Program in the states of New Hampshire and Massachusetts was also presented. Students practiced assembling the two-step naloxone pre-filled syringe nasal atomizer and using the one-step nasal atomizer. Participants included faculty and 787 students from the acupuncture, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, and physician assistant programs. – MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester Karyn.sullivan@mcphs.edu Education IPE, Other Health Profession Students, Student Pharmacists, PDMP, Naloxone, Internal Funding, Other Faculty, University Wide Community
Notre Dame of Maryland University Private Traditional MD In February 2017, the Notre Dame of Maryland University School of Pharmacy became an authorized educational entity for the Maryland Overdose Response Program. This program conducts workshops to train and educate pharmacists and university students on recognizing when naloxone is needed and how it is to be administered. As of the Summer of 2018, 618 people have completed the workshops. – Notre Dame of Maryland University amoody@ndm.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Pharmacists, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Public Outreach, Other Faculty, University Wide Community
Auburn University Public Traditional AL Being in the geographical center of the country’s prescription and illicit drug problem, Harrison School of Pharmacy faculty received a grant from the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) and the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) in 2016 to examine this issue and how to combat the problem. A team was assembled to conduct an interprofessional conference that has been held throughout the state of Alabama since 2016. The reception has been overwhelming with more than 1,500 attendees in six different cities over eight dates. Conferences have been held in Montgomery, Huntsville, Florence, Dothan, Mobile, and Birmingham. The conferences have included representatives from more than 20 disciplines, including law enforcement, physicians, pharmacists, government officials, social workers, nurses, and others. Presentations were made by representatives from state health agencies and law enforcement, among other professionals. – Auburn University foxbren@auburn.edu Education Government Funding, Other Health Professionals, Health Departments, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, IPE, Pharmacists, Law Enforcement
Auburn University Public Traditional AL Led by the assistant dean in the school’s Department of Pharmacy Health Services, a team is rolling out the Auburn University Naloxone Rapid Response Program. The program centers on training and education in the use of naloxone, as well as general awareness of the perils of opioid use. The Naloxone Rapid Response Program began in 2017 with representatives from the Harrison School of Pharmacy collaborating with City of Auburn’s Department of Public Safety, including police and firefighters, to equip the first responders with naloxone. The Auburn University Rapid Response Program instructors, which includes pharmacists and pharmacy residents, provided training seminars for all first responders. All were equipped with naloxone and trained by the end of 2017. The Alabama Department of Public Health assisted in providing a limited supply of naloxone for the initial training of the first responders. Since being equipped, first responders have used naloxone at least 12 times. While having naloxone available is an important component to saving the life of someone experiencing an overdose, the program also focuses on training and education. To grow and expand the program, the program leader is using the annual Auburn University’s Tiger Giving Day in February to raise money for more training and education opportunities. – Auburn University lloydkb@auburn.edu Education, Service University Wide Community, Student Pharmacists, Public Outreach, Naloxone, Pharmacists, Pharmacy Residents, Internal Funding, First Responders, Health Departments, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Law Enforcement, Harm Reduction
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH In 2007, the Ohio State University established Generation Rx to educate people of all ages about safe medication-taking practices and the dangers of prescription drug misuse (including opioids). Since 2009, Generation Rx has partnered with public and private organizations to develop and disseminate educational resources and support tools across the country. These free, turn-key materials have been used by tens of thousands of student pharmacists, health care professionals, community educators, teachers and others to reach millions in audience. Additionally, the Generation Rx team has provided a frequent expert voice in many hundreds of local, state, and national events about the opioid epidemic. Importantly, the work of Generation Rx is collaborative in every facet. With the connections and funding support of the Cardinal Health Foundation, Generation Rx leverages the content expertise of College of Pharmacy faculty, staff, and student pharmacists (at Ohio State as well as almost 120 other institutions around the country) to effectively educate a whole spectrum of audiences. It incorporates student pharmacists in all stages of its work, not only to harness their energy and creativity but also to instill the importance of community engagement in their professional development. The partnerships that have been established and continue to grow will be relevant and established when the next medication-related issue develops. – The Ohio State University kwiek.1@osu.edu Education, Service Generation RX, For-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Partner(s), Associations/Societies, Student Pharmacists, Public Outreach, For-profit Funding, Internal Funding, Elementary School Students, Secondary School Students, Other Health Professionals
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH The Generation Rx Laboratory is an Ohio State College of Pharmacy drug education research lab housed within the Center of Science of Industry (COSI), one of the premier science museums in the country. This space showcases best-practices pharmacology education while also promoting the safe use of medications (including opioids). It offers hands-on, inquiry-based pharmacology experiments to the general public. The Generation Rx Laboratory opened in 2012 with the joint support of the OSU Office of Research and Cardinal Health Foundation funding. Since the lab’s opening, over 20,000 museum visitors, as young as age 3 and as old as age 80, have conducted pharmacology experiments in direct lab programming or through interactive video conferencing. Their experiments, designed and delivered by the Ohio State’s College of Pharmacy student pharmacists and faculty, showcase basic science principles and reinforce safe medication-taking practices. Visitors are also able to see medicines in an action with our high-fidelity medical simulator, Bob the Abra Cadaver. Research has indicated that this type of experience increases the general public’s understanding of both science and medication safety principles as well as builds interest in science and health-related careers. In addition to its educational value to the community, this laboratory experience also benefits the dozens of undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and professional Pharm.D rotation students who deliver the content. Assessment data suggests that the impact of the Generation Rx Laboratory on student pharmacists improves their science communication skills and positively impacts their interest in teaching and education. – The Ohio State University kwiek.1@osu.edu Education Generation RX, Student Pharmacists, Public Outreach, Experiential, Non-profit Funding, Internal Funding
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH On July 25, 2018, The College of Education and Human Ecology, in partnership with the Colleges of Pharmacy, Social Work, and Public Health, offered a conference for Ohio educators concerning the opioid crisis. The purpose of the conference was to help teachers, principals, superintendents, administrators, school nurses, guidance counselors, coaches, and school social workers know more about the opioid crisis and what they can do to support children, families, and communities. Hundreds of educators attended the conference in person, streamed the conference live, and/or watched the taped conference at a later date. At the end of the conference, participants were able to recognize how the opioid crisis is affecting schools; understand the science of substance misuse disorder and how addiction forms and is treated; identify children who suffer from addiction, or whose caregivers suffer from opioid addiction; connect affected children and caregivers to appropriate social service providers; engage in effective conversations regarding addiction; identify the strategies for effective prevention programs and drug misuse education; participate in the reduction of stigma associated with substance misuse disorder; and recognize and respond appropriately to an overdose. The College of Pharmacy provided plenary and breakout presentations about opioid science and naloxone training. Additionally, representatives from the Generation Rx team shared classroom and school-targeted resources. – The Ohio State University kwiek.1@osu.edu Education, Service Public Outreach, IPE, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, For-profit Partner(s), For-profit Funding, Generation RX, Other Health Professionals, Naloxone, Associations/Societies, Elementary School Students, Secondary School Students, Harm Reduction
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH Beginning in 2016, a naloxone protocol was created at the Student Health Center Pharmacy on the campus of The Ohio State University. This was in order to expand the access of naloxone to Ohio State University faculty, staff, and students. – The Ohio State University schmuhl.5@osu.edu Practice Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Harm Reduction
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH To expand access to naloxone across the state, pharmacists, faculty and student pharmacists provided proponent testimony for House Bill 4. This bill allows pharmacists and pharmacy interns to dispense naloxone without a prescription under a physician protocol. The bill became effective in July of 2015 and now over 1,600 pharmacies across the state of Ohio dispense naloxone without a prescription via protocol. – The Ohio State University schmuhl.5@osu.edu Advocacy Naloxone, Pharmacists, Student Pharmacists, Legislation, Associations/Societies
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH The Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Drug Misuse Prevention and Recovery (HECAOD) is the premier alcohol and drug misuse prevention and recovery resource for colleges and universities across the nation. In 1995, the U.S. Department of Education funded The Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention (HEC). Due to federal budget cuts, the center was closed in 2012. In 2014, HECAOD was re-established as a joint collaboration between The Ohio State University’s College of Social Work, College of Pharmacy, and the Office of Student Life. The mission of HECAOD is to promote student success nationally by providing data-driven solutions to alcohol and drug misuse, as well as lead the dialogue on collegiate alcohol and drug misuse and recovery in the national agenda. The College of Pharmacy continues to partner and support HECAOD’s efforts toward fulfilling this mission as it relates to prescription drug misuse prevention and recovery efforts. Specifically, Generation Rx, powered through a partnership between the College of Pharmacy and the Cardinal Health Foundation, works closely with HECAOD to provide tools, training, and resources to campus professionals working to prevent medication misuse by college students, help cultivate a campus environment for the safe use of medications, as well as support students in recovery. The misuse of prescription opioid pain relievers remains a focus area as it relates to these efforts. – The Ohio State University downing.211@osu.edu Education, Service Generation RX, Non-profit Partner(s), SBIRT, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Internal Funding
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH During the 2017-2018 academic year, The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy hosted three interprofessional event sessions where student pharmacists worked in teams with other health professions students on opioid-related issues. The interprofessional event course sequence is designed to teach second and third-year professional student pharmacists how to advance collaboration and quality of patient care by providing opportunities to learn about, from, and with other members of the healthcare team. Each semester, the half-credit course has three interactive collaborations with at least one other healthcare discipline. Through the activities in this course sequence, students will be able to identify and describe the abilities, competencies, and scope of practice of other healthcare team members. By repeated interactions and knowledge sharing, students will demonstrate effective communication skills with other healthcare team members. Student pharmacists worked with second-year medical students focusing on scope of practice using team-based learning, worked with second-year medical students on a medication adherence exercise and prescription writing, and worked with 720 students from other health professions focusing on developing action plans to address the opioid crisis. Approximately 1,000 students from all health science colleges worked together to create action plans to address the opioid crisis. – The Ohio State University mcauley.5@osu.edu Education IPE, Other Health Profession Students, Student Pharmacists
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH The purpose of OPEP is to educate patients with new opioid pain medication therapies about the safe use, storage and proper disposal of these medications. The OPEP was developed through a partnership between Kroger and the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy. The OPEP was identified as a key area where pharmacists could impact patients and prevent misuse of prescription pain medications that could otherwise be misused. OPEP includes reviews of Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS) reports for patients presenting opioid pain medication prescriptions and special counseling for those starting new opioid therapies, using a checklist of educational points to be covered by the pharmacist and written materials to be provided to patients. OPEP pharmacists also had the option of engaging chronic opioid patients in the program as well. Fourteen days subsequent to dispensing, pharmacists made telephonic follow-ups with patients to see how the therapy was going, reiterate the key OPEP messages, answer patient questions, and stress the importance of proper disposal if the medication is no longer needed. The purpose of the research project was to evaluate and revise OPEP before disseminating it for use by additional community pharmacies. The research project was conducted between March and September 2017, in eight Kroger Pharmacies located in Chillicothe, Lancaster, Portsmouth, Waverly, and Wheelersburg, Ohio. Evaluation of the project ended in December 2017. The project was evaluated through surveys and focus group discussions with the pharmacists working at the eight pharmacies in Southeast Ohio. Results should be published in 2019. – The Ohio State University pekny.2@osu.edu Education, Research For-profit Partner(s), Pharmacists, Practice-Based Research, For-profit Funding, Drug Diversion, Drug Disposal, PDMP, Pain/Pain Management, Survey Research, Opioid Stewardship
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH The Generation Rx Collaborative is the registered student organization that promotes and utilizes the Generation Rx Program and ideals of safe medication practices for life. It was established in 2014 by several student pharmacists at The Ohio State University in conjunction with the Generation Rx Program. The Generation Rx Collaborative estimates that 91,573 people had in some way, shape or form been exposed to their promotional materials from January 2016 through April 2017 through presentations, utilization of toolkits from the generationrx.org website, and other events (e.g., local health fairs) – The Ohio State University Kwiek.1@osu.edu Education, Service Generation RX, Public Outreach, Internal Funding, Student Pharmacists, University Wide Community
The Ohio State University Public Traditional OH Established in 2015, the annual Pharmathon 5k walk/run was created to show support to the Generation Rx Program and promote safe medication practices for life. Since then, over 100 people annually gather at Ohio State to run the 3.1 miles through the streets of campus of The Ohio State University. Normal participation averages around 150 people each year who participate. The percent of revenue generation from the registration fee changes per year, but profits are donated back to Generation Rx initiatives. The Pharmathon was first established by students on campus that were part of the newly formed Generation Rx Collaborative student group. The event has grown in scope and has partnered with the Pharmacy Alumni Association to become a family-friendly event open to the entire public. – The Ohio State University Grovemiller.1@osu.edu Service Generation RX, Student Pharmacists, Internal Funding, Public Outreach
The University of New Mexico Public Traditional NM In 2016, a survey of students at the University of New Mexico was conducted to determine student pharmacists perceptions regarding naloxone prescribing and naloxone therapy in patients. The results were recently published. – The University of New Mexico Not provided Research Survey Research, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Internal Funding
The University of New Mexico Public Traditional NM The University of New Mexico Health Science center has four collaborative naloxone research projects: (1) Naloxone study at UNM Pain Center conducted in July 2014 (data published in 2016); (2) Naloxone study at UNM Addiction and Substance Abuse Program, follow-up analysis (characteristics of patients who used naloxone for others) conducted in September 2017; (3) Naloxone study at UNM Addiction and Substance Abuse Program, follow-up interview conducted in October 2018; and (4) Naloxone throughout NM, which has not yet started, working on IRB submission. The goals of these projects were to increase availability of naloxone for patients treated with opioids, to decrease overdose deaths in New Mexico, and to identify characteristics of the study participants who used naloxone to save lives of people who had opioid overdose. At the college level, a survey was conducted to understand first-year professional and third-year professional student pharmacists’ attitude of naloxone use. Naloxone training has been added to the UM curriculum so that their student pharmacists are ready to assess risks of opioid overdose when they are at the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) sites and discuss with their preceptors the need of naloxone for patients and their caregivers. – The University of New Mexico myamada@salud.unm.edu Education, Research Health Departments, For-profit Funding, Survey Research, Naloxone, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Experiential, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
The University of New Mexico Public Traditional NM Since 2009, the University of New Mexico Health Science Center College of Pharmacy has offered a Substance Abuse elective for student pharmacists. The course meets two hours a week for 13 weeks. Ten of the thirteen speakers address the opioid epidemic in their presentations. The goal of this elective is to educate student pharmacists (future Pharm.D.s) concerning the broad range of substance abuse problems in our society. Approximately 85% of the student pharmacists take this elective course each year resulting in over 600 of graduating Pharm.D. students receiving this education. – The University of New Mexico jmasserano@salud.unm.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Law Enforcement, Other Faculty
The University of New Mexico Public Traditional NM A University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy faculty member lead the POINt-Rx Program (Prevention of Opioid Overdose by New Mexico Pharmacists) initiated in 2015. The goals of this program are to utilize an established collaborative partnership to investigate barriers and facilitators to successful pharmacy-based opioid overdose prevention in both rural and urban areas, to identify and implement the most effective strategies for increasing access to intra-nasal naloxone, and to reduce health disparities through pharmacy-based prescribing. POINT-Rx is a collaborative effort between the UNM College of Pharmacy, New Mexico Pharmacists Association, and New Mexico Poison Control and Prevention Center. The Program combines scholarship, service, and innovative pharmacy practice goals. – The University of New Mexico LBakhireva@salud.unm.edu Research, Practice Naloxone, Pharmacists, State Government, Associations/Societies, CPA, Practice-Based Research, Harm Reduction
The University of New Mexico Public Traditional NM A University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy faculty member leads a large multi-site project entitled “A Multi-state Collaboration to enhance Naloxone Dispensing in Rural and Underserved Areas (CONsiDER).” CONsiDER is a multi-Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) collaboration between the Project Director and collaborators at Tufts and University of Minnesota, with the goal to develop a sustainable model to increase the dispensing of naloxone by community pharmacists to patients at risk of opioid overdose and to their caregivers. This multi-state collaborative approach among three Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative (CTSC) hubs leverages resources of the CTSA Program to address a pressing public health crisis. – The University of New Mexico LBakhireva@salud.unm.edu Research, Service Government Funding, Multiple School Collaboration, Naloxone, Pharmacists, Practice-Based Research, Harm Reduction
The University of New Mexico Public Traditional NM A University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy faculty member leads an R01-funded prospective cohort study ENRICH to study neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes associated with prenatal opioid exposure and neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS) (1 R01 AA021771). This UNM College of Pharmacy faculty member leads an innovative project to identify epigenetic factors which affect severity of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS) in infants exposed to medication assisted therapy with methadone or buprenorphine prenatally (R21 HD090733). – The University of New Mexico LBakhireva@salud.unm.edu Research Government Funding, MAT
Ohio Northern University Private Traditional OH Ohio Northern University recently established an Opioid Task Force on campus. The purpose of the Opioid Task Force is to bring together faculty, administrators, staff and students with interests in and expertise related to the opioid epidemic, and to address the epidemic in the surrounding communities, and beyond. ONU designates a special topic for study and service for the academic year. The opioid epidemic is the selected topic for the 2018-2019 academic year. A campus lecture series, open to the broader community, will focus on the opioid epidemic and relevant courses are incorporating readings and assignments related to the theme. The Opioid Task Force will also implement several programs to support the victims of and responders to this challenge. Additionally, ONU chose “Dream Land” by Sam Quinones as the University’s selected reading for the year. – Ohio Northern University r-kauffman.2@onu.edu Education University Wide Community, Public Outreach,
Ohio Northern University Private Traditional OH The Raabe College of Pharmacy at Ohio Northern University directs a mobile clinic, which provides an entry point into the healthcare system for people who are at risk for substance abuse, as well as those with behavioral health concerns among the medically underserved of our service area, which includes Hardin County , and portions of Allen and Hancock Counties in Ohio. These are rural communities with significant poverty and barriers to healthcare access. The proven innovative model to employ an existing mobile clinic using a multidisciplinary team of student healthcare providers under the supervision of a licensed professional to address the problems of substance abuse, its leading cause, and behavioral health concerns assists with addressing the opioid epidemic. This project will provide initial assessment, intervention, referral, and follow-up care for these issues. Regarding the opioid epidemic, the mobile clinic program goals are to (1) Provide an entry into the healthcare system for the underserved people in the service area that have or are at risk for substance abuse and behavioral health concerns; (2) Connect individuals with substance abuse and behavioral health concerns to specialized treatment services; (3) Provide case management following initial substance abuse and behavioral health treatment to improve adherence to treatment and reduce disease reoccurrence; and (4) Provide preventative health education on substance abuse to junior and senior high school students as well as the general public in the service area. – Ohio Northern University s-martin.11@onu.edu Education, Service, Practice For-profit Funding, For-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Partner(s), Secondary School Students, Government Funding, Health Departments, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Elementary School Students, Public Outreach, Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, IPP, Health-Systems, SBIRT
Ohio Northern University Private Traditional OH The Pharmacy Services Center in the Raabe College of Pharmacy at Ohio Northern University is engaged in chronic care management of patients with substance abuse disorder. The center, which opened August 2018, provides important patient care experiences integral to the curriculum for student pharmacists. For patient calls, clinicians will provide medication management, medication adherence education, reconcile medication, manage opiate use, and provide pain management, and serve as care coordinators. For physician calls, clinicians will identify gaps in care for patients, identify and offer solutions to drug therapy problems, and help physicians meet quality metrics. – Ohio Northern University s-martin.11@onu.edu Education, Service, Practice Student Pharmacists, Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management, Experiential, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Substance Use Disorder, Opioid Stewardship
Ohio Northern University Private Traditional OH The Ohio Northern University College of Pharmacy, through its many student organizations, provides substance abuse education in area schools. The program, which began in 2017 through a partnership with CVS Health, offers educational programming provided by pharmacist and pharmacy interns to 50 area high schools. The program has expanded to include education in the elementary and junior high schools throughout Hardin County, Ohio, where ONU is located. The programming follows the Generation Rx curriculum, and is provided in partnership with the Partnership for Violence Free Families in the county. – Ohio Northern University m-musser@onu.edu; l-peters@onu.edu Education Generation RX, Pharmacists, Elementary School Students, Secondary School Students, Health Departments, Public Outreach, For-profit Partner(s), Substance Use Disorder, Student Pharmacists
West Coast University Private Traditional CA The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Substance Abuse Prevention and Control program has developed a five-year strategic plan that will be carried out through the broad, cross-sector Safe Med LA coalition. The coalition is taking a coordinated approach to comprehensively address prescription drug abuse and ensure the health, welfare, and safety of communities. West Coast University joined the Safe Med LA coalition one year ago and has been an active participant in the outreach events and conferences and execution of the strategic plan. – West Coast University mdykhne@westcoastuniversity.edu Education, Service Health Departments, Public Outreach, Non-profit Partner(s)
West Coast University Private Traditional CA In 2017, West Coast University partnered with National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence of the San Fernando Valley (NCADD). As part of this partnership, WCU conducts naloxone training and education to the providers and the community to raise awareness of pharmacists furnishing naloxone. – West Coast University mdykhne@westcoastuniversity.edu Education Naloxone, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Non-profit Partner(s), Public Outreach, Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals
West Coast University Private Traditional CA As part of didactic curriculum, West Coast University has a lecture as part of the third year pharmacy school curriculum focusing on the law and regulation of pharmacist furnished naloxone. – West Coast University mPondrom@westcoastuniversity.edu Education Didactic, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists
Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Public Traditional NY Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences has piloted an interprofessional healthcare ethics activity that challenges pharmacy, medical, and nursing students to consider ethical dilemmas impacting the opioid crisis. Topics covered include needle exchange, expanded access to naloxone, substance use disorder in the healthcare profession, and stigma. Students are challenged to assess biases within their own professions and gain the perspectives of students from different professions. The first event is scheduled for Spring 2019. – Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences gratting@binghamton.edu Education IPE, Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Substance Use Disorder, Other Health Profession Students, Harm Reduction
Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Public Traditional NY Established by Binghamton University in the Spring 2018, the Opioid Research Center for Central New York is an interdisciplinary team working to develop innovative ideas and strategies for treating and preventing the harms of opioid use disorder. It has brought together health care professionals, scientists, and community leaders working to solve the opioid epidemic. The team is working collaboratively to foster innovation through synergy in order to better understand key facets of the epidemic, develop “out of the box” innovations, and leverage existing resources to make them more cost effective and impactful. The research will advance new approaches for the treatment of opioid use disorder, implement programs to prevent opioid related harms, promote best practices for treating chronic pain, and inform policies for reducing the impact of opioids on our communities. – Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences wegglest@binghamton.edu Research, Service Naloxone, Pain/Pain Management, Opioid Stewardship, Harm Reduction, Community-Based Research, MAT, Internal Funding
Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Public Traditional NY Initiated by a Binghamton University faculty member, the University developed a co-curricular activity that allows student pharmacists to work with faculty members performing community naloxone training. Student pharmacists have the opportunity to train healthcare professionals, community groups, and individual community members on how to use the life-saving antidote. – Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences wegglest@binghamton.edu Education Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals
Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Public Traditional NY Faculty at Binghamton University began working with a community partner in the Summer of 2017 to develop an out-of-the-box teaching program geared toward reducing the stigma associated with opioid use disorder in the community. Numerous teaching events have already been conducted. – Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences ariley@binghamton.edu Education Non-profit Partner(s), Substance Use Disorder
Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Public Traditional NY Binghamton University developed the “See Me Hear Me Treat Me” educational program for clinical personnel commonly involved in the treatment of people affected by addiction. This program will infuse real life incidences and events from previous users and impacted families to evoke an empathetic response to treatment by prescribers, nurses, social workers and pharmacists. The belief is that this atypical educational approach will move the health care practitioner from their normal level of comfortability and place them face-to-face with a user and their experiences to address barriers and biases that guide their decision-making processes. The goals of this project are to empower the user, the community, and providers to create a cohesive unit to eliminate or reduce the harm caused by addiction. Ultimately, the goal will be to see less discrimination against those with addiction/substance use disorder. – Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences ariley@binghamton.edu Education, Research Harm Reduction, Non-profit Partner(s), IPE, Other Health Professionals, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Internal Funding
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy developed an 8-week, 15 credit hour elective, "Prevention, Treatment, and Recovery of Substance Use Disorders," which is offered to third-year professional student pharmacists. This elective, developed in 2017, offers student pharmacists an introduction to substance use disorders, with a particular emphasis on opioid use disorder. Classes focus on understanding stigma associated with this disease state as well as pathophysiology, Medication Assisted Treatment, harm reduction and prevention, special populations, management of acute overdose, and recovery. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Education Substance Use Disorder, Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Harm Reduction, MAT, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Pharmacy is in the process of building a database within the Electronic Health Record (EHR) in family medicine clinics to identify patients with acute and chronic opioid prescriptions, including morphine equivalents daily. A population health approach is used to manage these patients to ensure use of opioids is concordant with institution policy and state law. This registry also helps ensure a comprehensive approach to pain. Pharmacy residents are building this registry and student pharmacists maintain it monthly. This database is the latest iteration of opioid stewardship initiatives that began at this practice in 2012. The development of the database began in July 2018 with the Information Technology department. In August 2018, the morphine equivalents was built into the database. In September 2018, the database was converted to a "workable" format to disseminate with providers. Monthly reports will be sent to providers beginning in October 2018. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Practice Opioid Stewardship, Pharmacy Residents, Non-profit Partner(s), Pain/Pain Management
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC In 2015, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Pharmacy faculty member created an Office Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) service within the family medicine residency due to a patient need that was not being met in the community. This faculty member wrote all the policies, procedures and protocols, trained staff and medical providers, and facilitated group medical visits. In 2017, this faculty member was able to hire a Licensed Clinical Social Worker/Licensed Clinical Addiction Specialist. A second LCAS was hired in 2018. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Service, Practice OBOT, Other Health Professionals, IPP, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Non-profit Partner(s), Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Buprenorphine, MAT
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC In July 2018, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Pharmacy was asked by the State of North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services to provide education, support, and resources so that all 17 North Carolina family medicine residencies can begin prescribing buprenorphine. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Education, Practice OBOT, Buprenorphine, Health Departments, State Government, MAT, Substance Use Disorder, Other Health Professionals
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Pharmacy faculty member is the program chair and presenter for a continuing education focused session on opioid stewardship at the 2018 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Midyear Clinical Meeting. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Education Continuing Education, Associations/Societies, Opioid Stewardship
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy was program chair and presenter for the Ambulatory Care Conference track session, "Opioid Use Disorder: Grappling with the Epidemic and Strategies for Solution," at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Summer Meeting 2018. The same faculty member also presented on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of buprenorphine as part of the Ambulatory Care Conference track of the meeting. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Education Associations/Societies, buprenorphine, Substance Use Disorder
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC Faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy are participating in the North Carolina Association of Pharmacists Opioid Practice Transformation Project. This is a three-phased initiative to increase awareness and education regarding the opioid epidemic for pharmacists in North Carolina. The initiative began in autumn 2017 with a series of continuing education videos recorded in partnership with the North Carolina Governor's Institute. For phase 2, a series of statewide workshops addressing the epidemic were held, beginning in September 2018. Planning and development of a certificate program, the third phase of the initiative, will begin in 2019. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Education Continuing Education, Associations/Societies, Government Funding, Health Departments, State Board of Pharmacy, Pain/Pain Management, Harm Reduction, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, MAT, Guidelines
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC Student pharmacists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy, who work at the Mountain Area Health Education Center, have been working since 2016 on a naloxone co-prescribing project intended to increase the number of patients with naloxone prescriptions. Following the release of CDC guidelines outlining those who should receive naloxone, student pharmacists identified patients who met predefined criteria for a naloxone prescription and training and flagged their charts to alert providers to the need to educate the patients during regular office visits. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Research, Practice Naloxone, Guidelines, Student Pharmacists, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Harm Reduction, Practice-Based Research
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A research project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy focused on patient experience with opioid use disorder treatment at a family medicine residency. Beginning in spring 2017, qualitative interviews were conducted with patients to assess their experience receiving office-based opioid treatment (OBOT) within primary care at the Mountain Area Health Education Center. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Research OBOT, Practice-Based Research, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Non-profit Partner(s)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC Faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy contributed to the Family Physicians Inquiry Network by providing evidence-based answers to questions pertaining to pain management and opioid use disorder. Two responses are currently in press - one addressing the most effective use of a non-opioid agent for osteoarthritis pain and the second addressing the relative efficacy of buprenorphine and naltrexone for treatment of opioid use disorder. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill courtenay.wilson@mahec.net Research, Service Pain/Pain Management, Substance Use Disorder, Buprenorphine, MAT, Non-profit Partner(s)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A CDC-funded research study at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy will screen older adult patients using the Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths and Injuries (STEADI) toolkit and identify patients at risk for falling within outpatient primary care clinics within the UNC Health Care System. Patients who are 65 years of age or older and taking either one opioid or benzodiazepine (BZD) will be identified using an electronic health record (EHR) from UNC Health Care and included in the study. Patients identified as at-risk will be educated on the risk of falls and injury posed by their opioid or BZD medication(s), and a de-prescribing medication protocol will be implemented with a multidisciplinary team. Prior research indicates that opioid and benzodiazepine medications are among the most difficult to manage. The new approach in this study will focus on educating health care professionals on how to employ a deprescribing protocol for these medications in older adults at risk for falls, incorporating alternate (and multidisciplinary) treatment modalities and/or medications where warranted. The intent is to create protocols specific to falls education, including information about de-prescribing specific to BZDs and opioids and alternate strategies for managing pain, insomnia, and/or anxiety. This study will identify factors affecting the effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance of a de-prescribing program focused on BZDs and opioids with the intent of reducing falls. This will enable creation of guidelines for developing and implementing similar programs for other health systems across the United States. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill stefanie_ferreri@unc.edu Research, Service Government Funding, Practice-Based Research, Other Health Professionals, Government Funding, Opioid Stewardship, Opioid Prescribing, Pharmacists, Health-Systems
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC Faculty members at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy are developing naloxone training modules for use by community pharmacists. The project includes surveying pharmacy staff in North Carolina to determine naloxone communications practices and training needs and performing a content review of current naloxone training programs. This work is an outgrowth of similar work done with nurses. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill dmcarpenter@unc.edu Education, Research Naloxone, Multiple School Collaboration, Pharmacists, Survey Research, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Continuing Education
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC Faculty members at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy are setting up pharmacogenetics studies of pain and opiates that will also look at drug/gene combinations implicated in neuropathic pain. The study will begin with patients in the UNC hospital who have cancer-related pain, although there are also geriatricians within the hospital that have expressed interest in pharmacogenetics studies of pain and opiates and there are plans for studies in sickle cell anemia patients. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill crona@email.unc.edu Research Pain/Pain Management, Other Health Professionals
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy is performing research on the design and evaluation of inhibitors of the kappa opioid receptor, specifically those that are expected to have diminished side effects because they are "biased" toward activating the G-protein pathway over the beta-arrestin pathway. These studies began as a screening project in the Molecular Libraries Initiative at the University of Kansas – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill jaube@email.unc.edu Research Multiple School Collaboration, Internal Funding, Government Funding, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC In autumn 2016, a student pharmacist in the Research and Scholarship in Pharmacy program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy started a project to develop rules underlying a virtual patient case involving opioid usage. The student presented a poster on this project at the 2018 American Pharmacists Association meeting. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill hubal@email.unc.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Associations/Societies
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy serves on the Board of Health & Human Services as the Pharmacist representative for Buncombe County. The opioid epidemic and substance abuse overall are major focus areas for the county's community health needs assessment. Through their Board participation, the faculty member has helped facilitate connection with community pharmacists to the pain killer task force, as well as convene a small group of community pharmacists to discuss the challenges they are experiencing. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill skiser92@email.unc.edu Service Health Departments
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy worked as part of a research team to examine the impact of pre-appointment chart review by a pharmacist on reducing the number of opioid prescriptions for patients in chronic pain while still managing the patients' pain. For this pilot project, a pharmacist reviewed the chart of all chronic pain patients with prescriptions for more than 50 morphine milligram equivalents/day and provided recommendations to the provider prior to an appointment. After four months, the mean morphine milligram equivalents/day prescribed was reduced by 14%, without an increase in reported pain. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill caseytak@email.unc.edu Research Government Funding, Internal Funding, Pain/Pain Management, Multiple School Collaboration, Opioid Prescribing, Practice-Based Research, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC Faculty members at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy are working to discover alternatives to opioids for pain relief. Avenues being pursued include structure-based design of novel opioids with biased agonism and the identification of non-opiate based analgesics from natural products such as medicinal teas. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill alex_tropsha@unc.edu Research Pain/Pain Management
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research has funded an STTR (Small Business Technology Transfer Research) proposal from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy entitled "Non-Opiate Topical Formulations for Treating Pain Associated with Molar Extractions." The goal of the project is to develop a local treatment for pain following the extraction of teeth, such as third molars ("wisdom teeth.") This involves placement of a material in the empty tooth socket that slowly releases an anesthetic drug over a one week period. Successful development of this product and its implementation in dentistry/oral surgery practice addresses the current opioid crisis in the US by leading to a significant reduction in the number of opioid (narcotic) prescriptions written for patients suffering from dry sockets or other pain resulting from dental procedures, thus diminishing the potential for addiction. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill mjay@email.unc.edu Research Government Funding, For-profit Partner(s), Pain/Pain Management, Abuse Deterrent Opioid Formulation
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A physician and pharmacist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are collaborating on the INSPIRE Trial, "INtegrated Services for Pain: Interventions to Reduce Pain Effectively." Supported by the Patient-Centered Outcome Research Institute (PCORI), this study will assess whether chronic pain patients who receive cognitive behavioral therapy have a greater opioid dose reduction (i.e., via opioid deprescribing), improved physical functioning, and lower pain interference relative to patients who receive involvement in shared decision making. This study grows out of a long-standing pain management and opioid-prescribing protocol within UNC Health Care that applies an evidence-based systematic approach to managing chronic pain with limited use of opiates. UNC researchers will be collaborating with researchers from Duke University, Vanderbilt University and the Research Triangle Institute on the PCORI study. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill timothy_ives@med.unc.edu Research Pain/Pain Management, Opioid Prescribing, Non-profit Funding, Multiple School Collaboration
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A pharmacy researcher at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy is collaborating with the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and the Gillings School of Public Health to study naloxone utilization in community pharmacies across North Carolina. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Research Naloxone, Pharmacists, Community-Based Research
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC Courses in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy curriculum include case studies on chronic pain, opioid use disorder and opiate deprescribing. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Opioid Prescribing, Pain/Pain Management
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy is a member of the Advisory Board for the North Carolina Controlled Substances Reporting System. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Service PDMP, State Government
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy is a member of the North Carolina DHHS Opioid and Prescription Drug Abuse Advisory Committee (OPDAAC.) – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Service PDMP, State Government
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy directs the Chronic Pain Program in the Department of Medicine at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Service PDMP, State Government
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy is a member of the UNC-CH High-Risk Alcohol and Substance Abuse Working Group. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Service PDMP, State Government
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy has given more than 15 presentations on opioid prescribing for continuing education credit to prescribers, primarily dentists, to meet their annual opioid Continuing Education requirement. These presentations began when the Area Health Education Center and the School of Dentistry asked for opioid prescribing content to address the need for continuing education for community providers. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill kasand@email.unc.edu Education Continuing Education, Other Health Professionals, Associations/Societies, IPE, Opioid Prescribing
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy is serving as a member of the North Carolina DHHS - Oral Health Section state level working group in coordination with NC DHHS OPDAAC (Opioid and Prescription Drug Abuse Advisory Committee.) The working group is trying to identify state initiatives for addressing dental/oral health prescribing issues. Through their work with the Dental Opioid Workgroup, the UNC and East Carolina University schools of dentistry received renewal of a Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Oral Health Workforce grant and will be involved in surveying practicing dental prescribers in both schools around narcotic prescribing. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Service Other Health Professionals, Government Funding, State Government, Opioid Prescribing, Opioid Stewardship
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy is a co-principal investigator of an AHEC Innovations Grant, "Enhancing Interdisciplinary Opioid Stewardship: Education and Training to Mitigate Postoperative Risk," intended to create online modules for use in both health discipline schools (Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry) and as continuing education (CE) content with practical implementation tools for health care professionals to change practice around opioid prescribing. The modules will be used/sustained to supplement in-class teaching or interprofessional education (IPE) seminars. Collaborators from the UNC Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, Nursing, Social Work, Dentistry and UNC Health Care are working together on this grant. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Education IPE, Continuing Education, Opioid Stewardship, Non-profit Funding, Other Health Professionals, Health-Systems
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy worked with oral surgeons and dental faculty to record two roundtable discussions on the opioid epidemic and prescribing. The content is being used in the dental curriculum, dental residency training, and as continuing education for providers on North Carolina's Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Education Other Health Professionals, Opioid Prescribing, Continuing Education, Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, PDMP
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Public Traditional NC Faculty members at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy are collaborating with faculty in the UNC School of Medicine in geriatrics and opioids research to evaluate medication management of opioids and benzodiazepines to reduce older adult fall risk, with support from the Health Resources and Services Administration. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Not provided Research Government Funding
Northeastern University Private Traditional MA Pain management content in the Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences School of Pharmacy pharmacotherapeutics course includes CDC and Massachusetts state data on the impact of the opioid epidemic. CDC recommendations for short and long term use of opioids are detailed in the context of curbing the opioid epidemic and implementing appropriate pain management. Massachusetts state legislative action related to the opioid epidemic is also outlined. Student pharmacists are encouraged to engage in discussion of Narcan dispensing and use during the pain management lecture. – Northeastern University m.jacobs@northeastern.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Guidelines, Pain/Pain Management, Substance Use Disorder, Naloxone, Opioid Stewardship
Northeastern University Private Traditional MA Student pharmacists at the Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences School of Pharmacy receive hands-on naloxone training in their Skills Lab course. Approximately 130 students are trained annually to improve their ability to teach patients how to use intranasal naloxone. – Northeastern University t.brown@northeastern.edu Education Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Didactic
Northeastern University Private Traditional MA Student pharmacists in the Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences School of Pharmacy course "Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practice in Urban Health" are given a lecture about being a clinical addiction pharmacist during the opioid epidemic, including potential career paths. The goal is to expose student pharmacists to the field of addiction pharmacy. – Northeastern University a.peckham@northeastern.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
Northeastern University Private Traditional MA Since 2016, a faculty member at the Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences School of Pharmacy has worked as a Clinical Addiction Pharmacist in the Bridge Clinic at Massachusetts General Hospital. The Bridge Clinic is a low threshold clinic for medically complex patients with substance use disorder which seeks to improve access to care for patients with substance use disorder, in particular opioid use disorder. – Northeastern University a.peckham@northeastern.edu Practice Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Non-profit Funding, IPP, Health-Systems
Northeastern University Private Traditional MA A faculty member at the Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences School of Pharmacy is engaged in a research program to investigate the emerging public health concern of gabapentin abuse that potentiates opioid high and may lower the threshold for opioid-overdose related mortality via respiratory depression. With the ultimate goal of reducing opioid-related overdose mortality, their research program also encompasses study of healthcare student knowledge related to the opioid epidemic and opioid overdose, to assess preparedness to combat the epidemic. – Northeastern University a.peckham@northeastern.edu Research Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Opioid Trends, Other Health Professionals, Internal Funding, Student Pharmacists, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Non-profit Funding, Multiple School Collaboration,
Northeastern University Private Traditional MA A faculty member at the Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences School of Pharmacy is actively involved in addiction recovery support in the town of Lowell, MA through the Meganhouse Foundation, including fundraising activities and an annual gala. The foundation has a residential recovery program for women with addiction to provide a safe environment for long term recovery and has also built extended living to further promote the women's recovery. – Northeastern University j.skrivin@northeastern.edu Service Non-profit Partner(s), Substance Use Disorder Treatment
Northeastern University Private Traditional MA Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences School of Pharmacy students engaged in research projects with a health sciences co-op student and a PhD student from the school of pharmacy to use a database to compare use of medical history to toxicological screening for opioid use disorder patients. This research has resulted in submitted publications and formal presentations at scientific meetings. – Northeastern University j.devlin@northeastern.edu Research Experiential, Substance Use Disorder, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Other Health Professionals, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment,
Northeastern University Private Traditional MA A faculty member at the Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences School of Pharmacy has received a grant from the Brain Research Foundation to investigate an intranasal gene therapy for opioid relapse reduction. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a beneficial protein normally present in low levels in the adult brain. It is a “neurotrophic factor” that is currently being investigated as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease, but there is also strong evidence that it has clinical potential as a therapy for opioid use disorder and relapse reduction. The problem in using GDNF as a drug is getting it into the brain where its actions occur. Proteins are too large to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), so the only approaches tried so far required surgical injections into the brain. Researchers at Northeastern University have developed a simpler and non-invasive approach that bypasses the BBB to increase brain GDNF, i.e., intranasal administration of gene nanoparticles (NPs) that make GDNF protein within the brain. The supported research will test whether this intranasal GDNF gene therapy can suppress the rewarding effects of opioid drugs and reduce the tendency to reinstate drug-taking after a period of abstinence. If results are positive, researchers will pursue major funding from NIDA and other agencies with the ultimate goal of testing this approach in a clinical trial. Intranasal DNA nanoparticles encoding (GDNF) could be developed as a non-invasive long-term therapeutic strategy for reducing opioid use disorder and relapse. – Northeastern University b.waszczak@northeastern.edu; b.ibelle@northeastern.edu Research Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Non-profit Funding, For-profit Funding
Sullivan University Private Accelerated KY Following promulgation of per-protocol naloxone dispensing in Kentucky in 2015, the Advancing Pharmacy Practice in Kentucky Coalition developed educational programming in support of this regulation. As a member of the Coalition, Sullivan University College of Pharmacy helped to develop the materials and implemented curricular incorporation and community outreach to provide training in per-protocol dispensation of naloxone and education in recognizing and knowing the risk factors for opioid overdose to student pharmacists and community pharmacists in Kentucky. – Sullivan University epalmer@sullivan.edu Education Naloxone, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Pharmacists, Multiple School Collaboration, Non-profit Funding, Associations/Societies, Student Pharmacists, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
Sullivan University Private Accelerated KY Sullivan University College of Pharmacy Residents at St. Matthews Community Pharmacy in Louisville, KY have been providing Vivitrol education and clinic administration of vivitrol since 2017 to patients at The Healing Place, a local recovery center. Their work includes education of pharmacists, residents, and students in ambulatory care clinical practice for patients with substance use disorder, including the long acting naltrexone administration Vivitrol. – Sullivan University acann@sullivan.edu; sslabaugh@sullivan.edu; cllayton@sullivan.edu Education, Practice Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Non-profit Partner(s), Student Pharmacists, Pharmacy Residents, Ambulatory Care Practice, For-profit Partner(s), MAT
Sullivan University Private Accelerated KY A faculty member at the Sullivan University College of Pharmacy was invited by the Kentucky Workman's Compensation Education Association to give a community lecture discussing alternative treatment options for opioid use disorder and the underlying science that helps to understand opioid use disorder and treatment. – Sullivan University eesposito@sullivan.edu Education Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Public Outreach,
Sullivan University Private Accelerated KY Since 2015, the Sullivan University College of Pharmacy has offered a team based learning activity and lecture regarding opioid use disorder as part of a substance use disorder elective. Students are taught about opioid use disorder and medication assisted treatment, including both history and pharmacology to enhance understanding of the disease state and treatment options. – Sullivan University epalmer@sullivan.edu Education Didactic, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, MAT, Student Pharmacists, Associations/Societies
Sullivan University Private Accelerated KY Sullivan University College of Pharmacy faculty are assisting in the review and enhancement of medication assisted treatment (MAT) availability for patients at a local hospital, including proposals for DATA (Drug Addiction Treatment Act) certification and buprenorphine/naloxone access expansion within the hospital. – Sullivan University efrederick@sullivan.edu Service MAT, Other Faculty, Health-Systems, Naloxone, Buprenorphine, Harm Reduction
Sullivan University Private Accelerated KY Sullivan University College of Pharmacy faculty and students presented an educational session to high students about the opioid epidemic. – Sullivan University eesposito@sullivan.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Secondary School Students, Public Outreach
Sullivan University Private Accelerated KY Student volunteers from Sullivan University College of Pharmacy have been assisting with naloxone distribution and counseling in rural regions via a mobile pharmacy since 2017, when the college was approached to help with the mobile pharmacy. Following naloxone certification training, student pharmacists are able to travel to rural areas and help distribute naloxone. – Sullivan University epalmer@sullivan.edu Service, Practice Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, State Board of Pharmacy, Public Outreach, Multiple School Collaboration, Government Funding, State Government, Associations/Societies, Harm Reduction
Sullivan University Private Accelerated KY The Sullivan University College of Pharmacy received a grant in 2016 to fund a large meeting regarding opioid use concerns. The meeting is being planned as a summit meeting of pharmacists as health care providers. – Sullivan University epalmer@sullivan.edu Education State Board of Pharmacy, Multiple School Collaboration, Associations/Societies, Pharmacists, Government Funding, State Government, Non-profit Partner(s)
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV Faculty at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy received support from Teva Pharmaceuticals and Regeneron to study opioid use among individuals with osteoarthritis. – West Virginia University nidwibedi@hsc.wvu.edu Research For-profit Funding, Opioid Trends
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV Faculty at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy are developing a model to predict transition to incident chronic opioid therapy, using a claims dataset of adults enrolled in commercial health insurance plans. Transition to incident chronic opioid therapy was defined as having at least a 90-day supply of opioids within 120 days of initiation of opioid therapy. – West Virginia University nidwibedi@hsc.wvu.edu Research Opioid Trends, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV Faculty at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy are being supported by the Veterans Administration to study opioid use among U.S. veterans. – West Virginia University nidwibedi@hsc.wvu.edu Research Opioid Trends, Government Funding
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV With the support of the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, dedicated to helping the people of West Virginia and Southwestern Pennsylvania, faculty at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy have studied the attitude and readiness of pharmacists in West Virginia with respect to dispensing naloxone. – West Virginia University nidwibedi@hsc.wvu.edu Research Naloxone, Pharmacists, Non-profit Partner(s), Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Pharmacists
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV With the support of the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, dedicated to helping the people of West Virginia and Southwestern Pennsylvania, faculty at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy are studying the knowledge of and attitude towards naloxone use in emergency situations among law enforcement officers. – West Virginia University nidwibedi@hsc.wvu.edu Research Naloxone, Law Enforcement, Non-profit Funding,
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV Faculty at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy are studying the utilization and expenditures related to chronic opioid use among working age adults. – West Virginia University nidwibedi@hsc.wvu.edu Research Opioid Trends, Substance Use Disorder, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV Faculty at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy are studying the impact of opioid use on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), a measure of an individual's perceived physical and mental health over time. – West Virginia University nidwibedi@hsc.wvu.edu Research Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Opioid Overdose/risk Assessment
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV The Safe and Effective Management of Pain Program (SEMPP), a division within the Rational Drug Therapy Program and part of the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy’s Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy, provides clinical opioid and pain management therapy review through prior authorization (PA) of chronic high dose therapy. SEMP utilizes the CDC’s Opioid Guideline of greater than 50 morphine milligram equivalents (MME) per day as the definition of high dose therapy. The program serves WV Medicaid and state government insurance enrollees (about 777,000) and reviews patients receiving an average of more than 50 MME’s per day over a 90 day period. Each PA request is reviewed by a clinical pharmacist to evaluate prescription, non-prescription, illicit, and non-pharmacological treatments and adherence to the program-specific SEMP guidelines. SEMP’s effort has been to communicate and educate prescribers state-wide by providing feedback on each authorization with an assessment of their compliance to the guidelines and a plan of possible alternatives according to the medically- accepted SEMP treatment algorithms. SEMPP’s other main focus is to ensure that prescribers are completing risk reduction strategies for each patient being prescribed a high dose opioid regimen. For each PA request, the prescriber must report if they have verified the patient’s profile in the WV Board of Pharmacy Controlled Substance Monitoring Program, initiated and completed a patient opioid risk assessment, completed a patient provider agreement, have educated the patient on being a candidate for carrying naloxone, and lastly if the patient is being prescribed naloxone. – West Virginia University Alesha.heil@hsc.wvu.edu Education, Service Pain/Pain Management, Guidelines, Opioid Prescribing, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, PDMP, Government Funding, Pharmacists, State Government, Other Health Professionals, Opioid Stewardship
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV The West Virginia (WV) Expert Pain Management Panel was formed in 2015 as a geographically and professionally diverse group, including the professions of medicine, osteopathy, nursing, pharmacy, psychology, dentistry, and public health in addition to representatives from insurers and the state prescription drug monitoring program, with intentions of developing pain management guidelines. These PAIN management guidelines intend to build upon the 2016 Chronic Pain OPIOID guidelines of the CDC by providing a risk reduction strategy and clinical pain treatment algorithms. The WV Safe & Effective Management of Pain (SEMP) Guidelines have been endorsed by multiple healthcare professional organizations within our state, including the WV State Medical Association, WV Osteopathic Medical Association, WV Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, WV Pharmacists Association and the WV Nurses Association, and have been featured in multiple statewide and national publications. – West Virginia University mkgarofoli@hsc.wvu.edu Service Pain/Pain Management, Guidelines, Government Funding, PDMP, IPP, Other Health Professionals, Pharmacists, Associations/Societies
West Virginia University Public Traditional WV The West Virginia University Health Sciences Center (WVU HSC) Substance Abuse Task Force is a collaboration of all of the healthcare professional schools within the WVU HSC to address the opioid crisis at ground zero. In the Winter of 2015, the task force began meeting, and with the interprofessional expertise of all the HSC professional schools, has continued to collaborate with community partners throughout the state and within WVU to improve the lives of West Virginia residents. – West Virginia University mkgarofoli@hsc.wvu.edu Service Substance Use Disorder, Other Faculty, Public Outreach
The University of Tennessee Public Traditional TN Students pharmacists in the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy currently complete a certificate program for Tennessee's statewide Naloxone Collaborative Pharmacy Practice, sponsored by the Tennessee Pharmacy Association, to dispense an opioid antagonist. This certificate program is independent of class time. Student Pharmacists then come into class and work on cases related to using the prescription drug monitoring program and receive training and hands on time with opioid antagonists. Previously available to students in their third-professional year, under Tennessee's new curriculum this material will be included in the first-professional year Spring Semester. – The University of Tennessee nhart9@uthsc.edu; crenfro@uthsc.edu Education PDMP, Student Pharmacists, State Government, Associations/Societies, Naloxone, Didactic, CPA, Health Departments
Purdue University Public Traditional IN Peer educators from the Purdue University College of Pharmacy are active on campus to raise awareness about prescription drug abuse. The student pharmacist peer educators give talks to student groups and hold tabling events during campus activities. These peer educators have been active since 2014, when the activity was started with a student organization on campus called Purdue Student Health Advocates. In 2017-2018, the peer educators were four student pharmacists and one nursing student. They presented to 13 student groups (500 students) and sorority house directors on campus. Pre and post knowledge assessments completed by attendees indicate a significant increase in eight of the 10 assessed items. – Purdue University jkrause@purdue.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Generation RX, Non-profit Funding, Public Outreach, IPE, Other Health Profession Students, Substance Use Disorder
Purdue University Public Traditional IN Purdue University holds a Lunch and Learn series for faculty and staff. Each year, 6-8 lunch and learns are scheduled. The purpose is to raise awareness about substance abuse and mental health related issues. Attendees learn about the Purdue campus environment and ways to incorporate available information into their teaching and interactions with students. The sessions are sponsored by the Campus Improvement Team, and pharmacy faculty and wellness staff collaborate with the team to plan the sessions each year. Many sessions address prescription drug misuse. – Purdue University jkrause@purdue.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Non-profit Funding, Other Faculty
Purdue University Public Traditional IN For over 20 years, the Purdue University College of Pharmacy has offered a one credit service learning elective course, "Drug Abuse/Addiction Education," each spring semester to first year Pharm.D students. At the end of the semester, the student pharmacists teach sixth graders a five hour program that covers substance misuse terms, substance use disorder, depressants, stimulants, and mind-altering drugs. The sixth graders complete a pre and post knowledge assessment, and a significant increase in their knowledge is observed. – Purdue University jkrause@purdue.edu; rvanrijn@purdue.edu Education Didactic, Substance Use Disorder, Secondary School Students, Internal Funding
Purdue University Public Traditional IN Continuing education articles written by Purdue University College of Pharmacy faculty and students have been published by the Indiana Pharmacist Alliance. One article was on the prescription drug abuse and misuse epidemic and one article was on heroin. – Purdue University jkrause@purdue.edu Education, Service Public Outreach, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Pharmacists, Associations/Societies, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
Purdue University Public Traditional IN Purdue University College of Pharmacy established the BoilerWoRx initiative as a response to Indiana's public health crisis stemming from the opioid epidemic. BoilerWoRx uses best available evidence-based data to guide multidisciplinary health care students and professionals as they work to make an impact in the areas hardest hit by this crisis. The College has developed mobile outreach capability and collaborates with multiple student groups across other colleges in the University. The College is also collaborating with the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering and has active engagements in the legislative arena, with county and state health departments, in research and service learning. The BoilerWoRx initiative began in early spring 2018 with funding from the Chaney Family Foundation (Purdue College of Pharmacy alumnus). – Purdue University catherine-scott@purdue.edu; boilerworx@purdue.edu Education, Research, Service, Practice, Advocacy Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Other Health Professionals, Non-profit Funding, Substance Use Disorder, Health Departments, Law Enforcement, Internal Funding, Naloxone, Legislation, State Government, Associations/Societies, Drug Disposal, Drug-Take Back, Non-profit Partner(s), Harm Reduction, Other Faculty, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Experiential
University of Florida Public Traditional FL The University of Florida provided interprofessional training on the importance of the prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) in combatting the opioid epidemic to third-professional year student pharmacists (229) and fourth-year dental students (61). The learning objectives were: 1) Explain the role of a pharmacist/dentist in appropriate use of opioids in patients with acute pain; 2) Communicate a patient issue to another healthcare professional; 3) Utilize a PDMP to make clinical decisions about prescribing/dispensing opioids. Students completed pre-reading on the PDMP as a helpful tool to combat the opioid crisis. Instructors facilitated a discussion on the PDMP in Florida, and the new opioid prescribing laws that took effect in July 1, 2018. Student teams then collaborated on a case of a patient seeking opioid medication. The student pharmacists utilized the PDMP to discover opioid overuse, and then had to verbally communicate their findings to the dental student and recommend alternatives to manage the pain. The dental students were encouraged to make a decision on an alternative medication and practice writing the prescription. The facilitators then played short videos which modeled appropriate interprofessional communication for the given scenario and also demonstrated some examples of inappropriate communication techniques. Invited practitioners from pharmacy and dentistry also shared stories about challenges with opioid-seeking patients, and tips on handling and referring these patients. Lastly, the students brainstormed ideas about how each profession (pharmacy and dentistry) can contribute to combatting the opioid crisis. – University of Florida whalen@cop.ufl.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, PDMP, IPE, Opioid Prescribing, Pain/Pain Management, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
University of Florida Public Traditional FL The University of Florida College of Pharmacy faculty team is taking bold, interdisciplinary and cross-college action to catalyze discoveries that will lead to more effective pain and addiction management strategies. A large grant on medications discovery and development was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) in December 2018. This is a natural products and drug discovery development chemistry, analytical, and pre-clinical pharmacology UG3 grant with a budget of $1.6M per year for 3-5 years. The grant will 1) assist NIDA in shaping its funding priorities for gathering much-needed data into the pharmacology of kratom, otherwise known as Mitragyna speciosa, and 2) develop mitragynine analogs as patentable, commercially viable opioid dependence treatments. – University of Florida lance.mcmahon@cop.ufl.ed; cmccrudy@cop.ufl.edu Research Substance Use Disorder, Government Funding, Other Health Professionals
University of Florida Public Traditional FL Researchers at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy have been funded by the UF Clinical and Translational Science Institute under the Learning Health System funding mechanism to test genotype-guided management of post-surgical pain. Hydrocodone, tramadol, and codeine are among the most commonly prescribed opioids, and the cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP2D6, is central to generation of highly potent metabolites for these opioids. CYP2D6 genotype leads to absent, reduced, or increased function, conferring poor (PM), intermediate (IM), and ultrarapid (UM) metabolism phenotypes, respectively. Data suggest avoiding hydrocodone, tramadol, and codeine in PMs, IMs and UMs because of increased risk for poor response (IM and PM) or toxicity (UM). Leveraging our experience from a recent study, we are testing the hypothesis that CYP2D6 genotype-guided management of post-surgical pain 1) is feasible, with reduced use of codeine, tramadol, and hydrocodone in PMs/IMs/UMs and 2) will improve post-operative pain control in PMs/IMs and reduce DEA Schedule II (C-II) opioids in NMs. We propose a pilot pragmatic clinical trial of 130 patients undergoing arthroplasty surgery, randomized 2:1 to a genotype-guided versus usual care approach. For patients with CYP2D6 PM, IM or UM phenotype based on genotype or drug interactions, a recommendation to avoid hydrocodone, tramadol and codeine will be made. In others, tramadol will be recommended, given its lower addiction risk than C-II opioids. Data will inform broader implementation in our health system and a larger trial of patient reported outcomes and healthcare utilization with genotype-guided pain management. – University of Florida lcavallari@cop.ufl.edu Research Pain/Pain Management, Internal Funding, Other Health Professionals, Opioid Prescribing, Other Faculty, Health-Systems
University of Florida Public Traditional FL Opioid-related research in the University of Florida College of Pharmacy includes four federally funded projects to develop new opioid medications as safer painkillers and treatments for opioid addiction and relapse. The work demonstrates kappa opioid receptor antagonists prevent relapse to drug-seeking behavior in abstinent subjects. This work also examines novel mixed-activity opioid agonist/antagonists as therapeutics to prevent both relapse and rewarding effects of abused drugs. Finally, researchers on these projects are developing novel opioids that treat pain without liabilities such as respiratory depression, constipation or addiction. This research has been supported by the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Department of Defense. – University of Florida jaldrich@cop.ufl.edu; jpmclaughlin@cop.ufl.edu Research Substance Use Disorder Treatment, MAT, Government Funding, Other Health Professionals, Pain/Pain Management, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed),
University of Florida Public Traditional FL Faculty at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy are involved in several areas of population-based research to address both issues of pain management and opioid misuse and its adverse sequelae. Related to pain management, there is ongoing pharmacoepidemiologic work evaluating discrepancies between practices and pain guidelines in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia (ADRD) and evaluation of uncontrolled post-surgical pain. To address the transition to opioid misuse and addiction, researchers at the college have received federal funding to develop prediction tools to identify problematic prescription opioid use and overdose and develop performance measures that assess screening practices. Finally, the college has an active policy-centered research program that evaluates federal, state, and local programs and policies intended to reduce harm from opioid sequelae. This research has been supported by the National Institute of Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Richard King Mellon Foundation and involves collaborations both internal and external to the University of Florida, including partners at the Universities of Pittsburgh, Arizona and Kentucky. – University of Florida almut@ufl.edu Research Pain/Pain Management, Harm Reduction, Other Health Professionals, Government Funding, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Substance Use Disorder, Naloxone, Harm Reduction, PDMP, Buprenorphine, MAT, Opioid Trends, Opioid Prescribing
University of Florida Public Traditional FL The University of Florida Colleges of Pharmacy, Dentistry, Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, and Veterinarian Medicine collaborated on an interprofessional opioid misuse training in October 2018. The purpose of this activity was for students to learn as members of interprofessional health care teams how to identify and make referrals for individuals with substance/opioid use disorder or at risk for development of a disorder. At the end of this learning activity, students should be able to: 1) Assess the severity of substance use/abuse and identify individuals who need referral; 2) Practice motivational interviewing techniques to encourage behavioral change; 3) Identify appropriate resources for referral and treatment for individuals suspected to need referral; 4) Collaborate with other professionals to identify, assess, motivate and refer individuals for treatment. The instructional format was: • Training on Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT): Experts trained to use the SBIRT approach provided a 90 minute training session to students. SBIRT is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA). • Interactive case discussions and role play: In interprofessional teams of 4 -6, students discussed cases and practice application of assessment and referral skills through role play and observation. A non-profit community organization, Drug Free Duval, provided the SBIRT training portion while faculty from each college put together the scenarios and training videos and facilitated the activities live. – University of Florida Motycka@cop.ufl.edu Education SBIRT, Student Pharmacists, IPE, Other Health Profession Students, Non-profit Partner(s), Didactic, Other Faculty, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
University of Florida Public Traditional FL The University of Florida College of Pharmacy provides a Substance Use Disorder Module and Naloxone Training Skills Lab Module in its integrated curriculum. 1) Third-professional year students complete a patient care course focused on the Brain and Behaviors. The last module in this 6 credit course focuses on Substance Use Disorders and Clinical Toxicology. Within the module, student pharmacists are taught via didactic lectures the etiology and epidemiology of substance use disorders, pharmacology of addiction, medicinal chemistry of addiction, management of substance use disorders including opioids, drug testing, and finally the legal and ethical issues surrounding substance use disorders. Student pharmacists then bring this knowledge to a four hour active learning session which works through a longitudinal patient case involving a suspected misuse problem that culminates with an overdose and the need to dispense naloxone to the patient and provide counseling at the end of the session. The student pharmacists interview the patient through each “scene” and develop a plan at each step in her progression. Also included in the active learning session are mini-cases surrounding colleague misuse. Medicinal chemistry and pharmacology are introduced where appropriate by the basic scientists who teach those sections, making the module a truly interdisciplinary approach to teaching substance use disorders. 2) The skills lab module for Naloxone training coincides with this module. Student pharmacists learn when to recommend naloxone be dispensed to patients, how to counsel the patients on appropriate use, become familiar with the trainers, and learn the legal aspects of dispensing naloxone. – University of Florida Motycka@cop.ufl.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Didactic, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Impaired Health Professionals
University of Florida Public Traditional FL Student pharmacists at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy, who were interested in teaching our community about opioid misuse, were encouraged to volunteer their time to become community trainers in three topics: Safe storage and disposal of medications, signs of opioid misuse, and naloxone use. Student pharmacists who completed three hours of training could then sign up as volunteers and potentially be contacted by a local non-profit organization to provide the training in turn. To provide the training, student pharmacists are teamed up with pharmacists or other health care providers. Training sessions can be as short as 30 minutes or as long as two hours. Local groups who have been provided the training thus far have included homeless shelters, foster parents of teenagers, schools, parent groups and churches. This activity has been facilitated by a faculty member who is very involved in community outreach and education through a local organization. Student pharmacists now comprise nearly half of the program's community trainers, and more than 1,026 individuals in the community have been trained since August 2017. – University of Florida Motycka@cop.ufl.edu Education, Service Naloxone, Other Health Professionals, Student Pharmacists, Drug Disposal, Public Outreach, Pharmacists, Non-profit Partner(s), Substance Use Disorder, Harm Reduction
Samford University Private Traditional AL The McWhorter School of Pharmacy at Samford University will provide naloxone training for third-professional year student pharmacists in early 2019. The key learning objectives of the training will be to identify patients who are candidates to receive a naloxone kit, develop a process to address/approach patients who are candidates, identify overdose signs/symptoms, learn naloxone administration techniques, and become familiar with laws addressing this topic. An important goal of this training is harm reduction. Faculty from other health professions schools on the Samford campus, e.g., Social Work, Public Health and Nursing, members of the State Board of Pharmacy and local harm reduction advocates will be invited to participate in the training program. – Samford University mgkendra@samford.edu Education Naloxone, Other Health Professionals, Student Pharmacists, Harm Reduction, Other Faculty, Didactic, For-profit Partner(s), State Board of Pharmacy, Didactic, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, IPE
University of Southern California Private Traditional CA The University of Southern California School of Pharmacy convened the daylong 18th Annual Moving Targets Conference on August 17, 2018 in Los Angeles, CA. The conference focused on pain management with an emphasis on combating the opioid crisis from an interdisciplinary perspective covering policy, clinical care, and breakthroughs in drug discovery. Speakers included Dr. Kim Janda, who spoke about an anti-heroin vaccine; Dr. Brian Schoichet, who spoke about developing an opioid product with reduced addictive potential; Dr. Scott Mosley of the USC School of Pharmacy, whose research focuses on optimizing drug selection through the use of genetic information; and Dr. Melissa Durham of the USC School of Pharmacy, who spoke from the perspective of a pharmacist in a clinical setting. Dr. Rosalie Pacula, whose research focuses on the effectiveness of policy interventions aimed at combating illicit drug behaviors, was the keynote speaker. This annual symposium was organized by the USC student chapter of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS). – University of Southern California alachkar@usc.edu Education Pain/Pain Management, Associations/Societies
University of Southern California Private Traditional CA The University of Southern California (USC) College of Pharmacy is offering numerous Continuing Education Programs related to the opioid crisis. On Sunday, August 19, 2018 the USC School of Pharmacy convened the inaugural California Pharmacy Law and Ethics Summit, bringing together notable experts on law, ethics, and the opioid epidemic to assist pharmacists in complying with the law and making ethical decisions to positively impact patient care. Practicing pharmacists and pharmacy business owners received practical recommendations for improving drug safety, storage, record-keeping and implementing new regulations. Additional future programming will be provided by faculty and residents at the USC School of Pharmacy, with topics including “Managing Pain During the Opioid Crisis” and “Harm Reduction Through Naloxone Rescue: The Pharmacist’s Role.” – University of Southern California mdurham@usc.edu Education Continuing Education, Pharmacists, Naloxone, Pain/Pain Management, Pharmacists
University of Southern California Private Traditional CA The University of Southern California (USC) School of Pharmacy was awarded grant funding from the Cardinal Health Foundation's Generation Rx Best Practices in Pain Management program. The USC School of Pharmacy is one of 10 healthcare organizations that received a one-year grant to create measurable action plans designed to modify opioid prescribing, increase patient engagement and improve outcomes for patients suffering from chronic, non-cancer pain. The grants are designed to help healthcare organizations better engage healthcare providers, patients and caregivers to reduce the number of opioids prescribed for pain. In USC's pilot program, patients are referred to the service from providers in the Keck Medicine of USC Health System to a community pharmacy-based consult service. Therapeutic recommendations are provided to prescribers as well as recommendations for risk reduction and harm reduction strategies for patients on opioid therapy. – University of Southern California mdurham@usc.edu Practice Health-Systems, Non-profit Funding, Pain/Pain Management, Generation RX, Opioid Prescribing, Community Practice
University of Southern California Private Traditional CA Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) has formed the USC Task Force on Opioid Prescribing Guidelines in order to create guidelines for USC health system prescribers. A community-based pharmacy practice resident in pain management and opioid medication safety and an assistant professor of clinical pharmacy at the USC School of Pharmacy are both members of the task force. – University of Southern California mdurham@usc.edu Service Opioid Prescribing, Pain/Pain Management, Pharmacy Residents, Other Health Professionals, Other Faculty, Guidelines
University of Southern California Private Traditional CA The University of Southern California (USC) School of Pharmacy will host a university-wide USC Visions & Voices author talk on Jan. 28, 2019 about the opioid crisis. The talk will feature Los Angeles Times journalist and bestselling author Sam Quinones, author of “Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic.” The event will be moderated by Dr. Melissa Durham of the USC School of Pharmacy. – University of Southern California mdurham@usc.edu Education Public Outreach, Internal Funding, University Wide Community, Opioid Trends
University of Southern California Private Traditional CA New in the 2018-19 academic year, the University of Southern California (USC) launched a micro seminar for incoming first-year undergraduate students called “Buzzed: Modern Pharmageddon, Abuse or Addiction,” led by faulty from the School of Pharmacy. USC also launched a new, similarly titled undergraduate course for non-majors: “Buzzed: Modern Substances of Abuse and Addiction.” – University of Southern California ddavies@usc.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, University Wide Community
Oregon State University Public Traditional OR Faculty in the Oregon State University College of Pharmacy maintain active research portfolios related to the opioid crisis. One faculty member has been working in the area for more than five years and has received over $3 million in externally funded grants from federal agencies to conduct policy research. One of the most tangible products from this work has been the development of a pharmacy opioid safety toolkit. The development and testing of this educational resource was funded by AHRQ (R18HS024227A; PI Hartung). Oregon State faculty are currently collaborating with investigators at Boston Medical Center to enhance this toolkit to improve how community pharmacists engage with patients about naloxone use (REPSOND to PREVENT; R01 DA045745; PI: Green). A new study will combat the opioid epidemic by testing the effectiveness of a novel program that targets community pharmacists. The new program is innovative for its combing two educational interventions, both of which have shown promise in reducing opioid-related harms. The first program, called RESPOND (or Resources Encouraging Safe Prescription Opioid and Naloxone Dispensing), educates pharmacists on tools they can use to more effectively screen for opioid medication risks and engage in difficult conversations with patients around opioid safety. The second program, MOON (or Maximizing Opioid Safety with Naloxone), provides resources to enhance patient education, improve access and increase dispensing rates for Naloxone, a non-addictive medication that can reverse opioid overdose. The new, combined program will be called RESPOND TO PREVENT. In addition to this, the faculty member has been PI on two CDC funded studies to investigate state policies that limit prescription opioids (1U01CE002500) and implications of those policies on unintended heroin initiation (1U01CE002786) and is a co-investigator on other CDC and NIDA funded projects. – Oregon State University hartungd@ohsu.edu Research Government Funding, Non-profit Partner(s), Naloxone, PDMP, Pharmacists, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Multiple School Collaboration, Federal Government, Pharmacists, Community Practice, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
University of Maryland Eastern Shore Public Accelerated MD The University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) School of Pharmacy and Health Professions established and maintains an educational and community based program to prevent unintentional opioid overdose deaths through building increased public awareness and preparing individuals with the necessary knowledge and skills to render emergency treatment of opioid overdose. Established February 2016, UMES was the first and for more than a year the only health professional school authorized by the Maryland Department of Health as part of the state opioid Overdose Response Program (ORP) network. The UMES ORP utilizes a grassroots approach of training each successive class of student pharmacists to administer naloxone. The UMES ORP also seeks to train and engage students in disseminating information to further prepare them to be effective ORP advocates for and educators of pharmacists and pharmacies. – University of Maryland Eastern Shore jlbresette@umes.edu Education Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Health Departments, For-profit Funding, Public Outreach
University of Maryland Eastern Shore Public Accelerated MD In response to the growing opioid crisis, student pharmacists trained by the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) Overdose Response Program (ORP) in conjunction with the School of Pharmacy and Health Professions administration created the Substance and Opioid Abuse Awareness Response (SOAAR) project as a means to convene stakeholders and educate community members to engage locally to help reduce opioid-related mortality and overdoses. Held on the UMES campus on 29 April 2017 in conjunction with the National Drug Take Back Day, Project SOAAR achieved four goals: 1) increase awareness of substance abuse and opioid overdose, 2) explain issues associated with addiction and substance use disorder, 3) promote substance abuse community resources and treatment organizations, and 4) train laypeople to recognize opioid overdose and safely administer nasal Narcan™. SOAAR attendees were able to choose three of six repeating concurrent 45-minute morning workshops covering access to treatment, resources for family, community and school populations, responsible prescribing and use of opioid medication, peer-to-peer counseling and recognizing the signs and symptoms of opioid overdose and effectively administering Narcan. Attendees completing the latter workshop received free Narcan medication to take home. A luncheon panel discussion featured physicians practicing in addictionology and emergency room care, a mother who lost a child to opioid overdose, a State’s Attorney’s Office prosecutor, and a church pastor (former businessman and heroin user). Also present were 25 exhibitors representing local contacts for substance abuse prevention, treatment and mitigation. – University of Maryland Eastern Shore jlbresette@umes.edu Education, Service Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Naloxone, Law Enforcement, Internal Funding, Student Pharmacists, IPE, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Health Departments, Non-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Funding, For-profit Funding, Harm Reduction
University of Maryland Eastern Shore Public Accelerated MD In Spring Semester 2016, the University of Maryland Eastern Shore School of Pharmacy and Health Professions added opioid abuse, overdose morbidity and mortality and naloxone rescue to the existing required Public Health course. Students are trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of opioid overdose and safely perform naloxone rescue. Students are also trained to be advocates for naloxone education and dispensing. The course also tasks students working in groups to develop 3-5 questions and appropriately referenced answers that could come from patients and pharmacists. Over successive course offerings, these accumulating FAQs and referenced responses become part of a resource tool kit to allow provide students their own basis for advocacy and community education. – University of Maryland Eastern Shore radebenedetto@umes.edu Education Didactic, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
University of Maryland Eastern Shore Public Accelerated MD The Maryland Department of Health provides annual grant funds to each of its counties to promote multi-agency, community groups and faith-based involvement and local interventions. The Somerset County Health Department convenes the Somerset County Opioid United Team (SCOUT) to develop, plan and carry out local education, prevention and intervention events. The University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) Overdose Response Program (ORP) actively participates with SCOUT efforts. The UMES ORP in partnership with the Somerset County Health Department will conduct naloxone rescue trainings during September 2018 “Somerset Rains Purple” SCOUT organized event in the county seat of Princess Anne. – University of Maryland Eastern Shore jlbresette@umes.edu Education Health Departments, Non-profit Partner(s), Student Pharmacists, Government Funding, State Government, Naloxone, Public Outreach
University of Colorado Public Traditional CO A faculty member in the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science Department of Clinical Pharmacy has, since 2013, chaired the Colorado Consortium for Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention, Colorado's statewide Task Force addressing the opioid crisis, using a cooperative, collaborative, interagency and interprofessional approach. The Consortium was appointed by Governor John Hickenlooper in 2013, and since that time the faculty member has led the statewide work, housed administratively at the Skaggs School. All state agencies in Colorado, health professional societies, treatment providers, health care organizations, payers/insurers, medical malpractice companies, workers compensation division and insurers, patient advocacy organizations, AHEC centers, Colorado Association of Local Public Health Organizations, local substance abuse prevention coalitions, law enforcement departments and other are open to belong (and most do belong) to the Consortium. – University of Colorado robert.valuck@ucdenver.edu Education, Research, Service Associations/Societies, IPE, MAT, PDMP, Drug Disposal, Drug-Take Back, Other Faculty, Health Departments, Law Enforcement, Naloxone, Non-profit Funding, Non-profit Partner(s), Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Opioid Trends, Other Health Professionals, Pain/Pain Management, Public Outreach, State Government, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Government Funding, Harm Reduction
University of Kentucky Public Traditional KY Faculty and students in the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy are addressing the opioid epidemic within Kentucky, one of the areas of the country hardest hit by the epidemic. Didactic content related to the epidemic is included in the second year policy, outcomes and public health course. Faculty and student pharmacists participate in a mobile clinic that brings naloxone education to underserved communities, and the Rho Chi Honor Society has made naloxone education for under-served minorities a priority area. Faculty research encompasses substance use disorder treatment, policy and legislation. – University of Kentucky trish.freeman@uky.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Pharmacists, Non-profit Funding, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Non-profit Partner(s), Naloxone, Public Outreach, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
Western New England University Private Traditional MA Western New England University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences faculty are investigating student pharmacists' attitudes towards substance use and substance users. The research study, "Predictors of substance use attitudes among pharmacy students," aims to determine what factors predict drug use attitudes among student pharmacists for each class of drugs (alcohol, marijuana, heroin and prescription opioids) and which demographic differences among students modulate the magnitude of these effects and whether student's self-esteem is a mediator of their permissiveness attitudes towards alcohol, marijuana or opioid use. Data are collected via a survey that is administered to first-professional, second-professional, and third-profession year students, two times during the academic year (beginning and end of fall semester) – Western New England University jilla.sabeti@wne.edu Research Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Survey Research, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
Western New England University Private Traditional MA The Western New England University School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences issued a Dean’s Call to Action Initiative in September 2016. In response to the opioid crisis, and given the vital role that the College of Pharmacy could play in curbing the tide, Dean Robinson issued a challenge “to every learner organization to engage in one project large or small” to address the crisis in a meaningful way. A document outlining an “Action Plan to Address the Opioid Epidemic” was disseminated with the Call. The document included the following: A) ‘what and where is the opioid and substance abuse problem,’ highlighting charts and statistics of how the crisis impacts every community in Massachusetts; B) What is being done to address the issue, highlighting the Governor’s action plan and number of local initiatives launched within the greater community; and C) a listing of suggested initiatives that the college could undertake that fit within four general areas of prevention, intervention, treatment, and/or recovery support. Specific lines of action were suggested, including education directed toward various populations on the stigma of addiction, education about naloxone and medication assisted treatments and patient/student/pharmacist education on opioid safety. Additionally, the College was charged to look at co-curricular efforts for opportunities to address this issue in conjunction with our healthcare partners. Learners/Learner Organizations were instructed to submit proposed events/activities to address the Call-to Action. – Western New England University jilla.sabeti@wne.edu Education University Wide Community, IPE
Western New England University Private Traditional MA Western New England University's School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences hosted the HealthyU Public Lecture Series, “Let’s Talk About It: Opioid Addiction and Overdose Prevention Basics." The purpose of the HeathyU public lecture series is to promote health, wellness, and education in the community. Speakers drawn from the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences share their expertise with the greater community and offer valuable knowledge about the intersection of health and chemicals we encounter in our daily lives. These events are free and open to the public. One lecture focused on opioid overdose prevention and naloxone education and explored several key questions: What are opioids and how do they work? How can I recognize the signs of opioid abuse or overdose? And what can I do to support those who struggle with addiction to be healthy? Posters/flyers were created for the event and distributed throughout campus as well as local public libraries. As well, ads were run in the local newspapers inviting the general public. – Western New England University ronny.priefer@wne.edu; jilla.sabeti@wne.edu Education Public Outreach, Naloxone, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Internal Funding, University Wide Community, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Secondary School Students
Western New England University Private Traditional MA The Western New England University School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences pain therapeutics lessons for third-professional year students have expanded their discussion of chronic pain, opioids and naloxone since 2015. The lessons include review of the CDC guidelines for opioid prescribing in chronic non-cancer pain, discussion of more recent literature taking a closer look at alternatives to opioids for treating pain and how to treat pain in the emergency department and post surgery. The lessons now also include the use of naloxone for reversing overdoses for both illicit and prescription medications. – Western New England University mark.klee@wne.edu Education Didactic, Guidelines, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management
Western New England University Private Traditional MA The Western New England University School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences had 94 learners involved in a study Beta testing a phone application designed to connect potential overdose victims with naloxone carriers and emergency medical services. – Western New England University Not provided Education, Research Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, First Responders, Drug-Take Back
Western New England University Private Traditional MA A faculty member in the Western New England University School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is actively involved with the Quabog Hill Substance Use Alliance, which has monthly meetings and focuses on prevention, treat and recovery of substance use disorder in Central MA. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) students also attend the monthly meetings and have written op-ed pieces for local paper about proper medication disposal/drug take back day. – Western New England University Not provided Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Experiential, Substance Use Disorder, Non-profit Partner(s), Drug Disposal, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
Medical University of South Carolina Public Traditional SC A faculty member at the Medical University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy is investigating beta-arrestins and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs.) Beta-arrestins detect and bind activated GPCRs on the plasma membrane, enabling them to control GPCR desensitization, internalization and intracellular trafficking. Beta-arrestins serve as ligand-regulated scaffolds for GPCR-mediated signaling and also influence the tonic level of pathway activity in cells. While biased GPCR agonists have shown the ability to preferentially regulate G-protein versus arrestin pathways, an alternative and highly novel approach would be to use full agonists in combination with a beta-arrestin inhibitor. Growing evidence supports the physiological and pathophysiological roles of beta-arrestins, and underscores their potential as therapeutic targets. Circumventing beta-arrestin-dependent GPCR desensitization may alleviate the problem of tachyphylaxis for patients taking opioids that target GPCRs, and find application in the management of chronic pain. From a historical perspective, the ability to inhibit beta-arrestins will lead to a new generation of pharmacology. As opposed to creating biased agonists, beta-arrestin inhibitors provide a direct, dynamic and titratable way to regulate beta-arrestin and therefore opioid function. The approach is innovative in that the researchers aim to modulate the signaling of existing GPCR ligands by inhibiting beta-arrestin function. The reserchers goals are to establish chemical probes and lead molecules that target beta-arrestin and prevent its interaction with GPCRs, and to define its signaling and toxicity properties in vitro to maximize efficacy and safety of GPCR agonists. – Medical University of South Carolina petersy@musc.edu Research Pain/Pain Management, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed),
Medical University of South Carolina Public Traditional SC The Medical University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy requires all first, second and third professional year students to participate in the service-learning program Generation Rx. Generation Rx is a state-wide educational outreach program addressing prescription drug misuse and abuse. The purpose of the program is to enhance medication safety and combat the increasing misuse and abuse of prescription drugs through educational prevention. Programming is targeted to all age groups (elementary – college), and student pharmacists work in teams to offer these educational programs, either in smalls groups or larger assemblies – Medical University of South Carolina brittain@musc.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Elementary School Students, Secondary School Students, Public Outreach, Generation RX, Associations/Societies
Drake University Private Traditional IA The Drake University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences hosted Identify, Prevent, Recover: Combatting Opioids in Iowa. This conference on the opioid epidemic pulled together healthcare professionals and policy makers from across Iowa. Following a welcome from Dean Renae Chesnut and two panels featuring health care provider strategies and Iowa’s response, Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds laid out a four-point plan to combat opioid addiction. – Drake University renae.chestnut@drake.edu Education, Advocacy Other Health Professionals, Non-profit Partner(s), State Government, Health Departments, Substance Use Disorder, Public Outreach
Drake University Private Traditional IA Drake University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (CPHS) faculty have given presentation on the Drake campus, at area partners and at conferences on the opioid epidemic. Examples include the presentations “Opioids – Mechanisms of Analgesia and Addiction” at the Opioid Summit, Drake University, August 2, 2016, organized by CPHS, Governor’s Office of Drug Control Policy, and the US Attorney’s Office Northern District of Iowa; “Opioids – Mechanisms of Analgesia and Addiction” at the 8th Annual Heartland Global Health Consortium Conference, Drake University, October 5, 2016; “Opioids – Mechanisms of Analgesia and Addiction” at the Student Opioid Summit, Drake University, October 7, 2016; “Opioids – Mechanisms of Analgesia and Addiction” at the Iowa Primary Care Association Annual Conference, West Des Moines, IA October 19, 2016; “Opioids: The Scope of the Problem and Mechanisms of Action” at the Mercy College of Health Sciences 12th Annual Research Symposium, Clinical Approaches to the Problem of Opioid Addiction, April 3, 2017; “The Opioid Epidemic and What’s Being Done to End It,” during Let’s DU Lunch, November 1, 2017; and “The Opioid Epidemic and What’s Being Done to End It” at the Central Branch of the National Association of Social Workers, December 6, 2017. – Drake University craige.wrenn@drake.edu Education University Wide Community, Internal Funding, Associations/Societies, Public Outreach, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
University of the Sciences Private Traditional PA The Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences includes the interprofessional 3 credit elective course "Detecting and Treating SUD Utilizing SBIRT" in its catalog each semester, and has done so since 2012. The course is offered to Pharmacy, Physician Assistant, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Kinesiology and Psychology students, and the SBIRT component of the course is supported by a grant from SAMHSA, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. – University of the Sciences g.downs@iusciences.edu Education SBIRT, Other Health Profession Students, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Government Funding, Federal Government, IPE, Didactic
University of the Sciences Private Traditional PA Since 1988, students, faculty, and staff from all disciplines of University of the Sciences have attended the APhA Institute on Alcohol and Drug Dependencies. – University of the Sciences g.downs@iusciences.edu Education Associations/Societies, Internal Funding, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Continuing Education, Impaired Health Professionals
University of the Sciences Private Traditional PA Several faculty members at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences are participants in the Philadelphia Mayors Task Force on Opioid Overdose Prevention. This participation has facilitated multiple interactions with clinical and public health professions in the region. – University of the Sciences g.downs@iusciences.edu Education, Research, Service, Advocacy Health Departments, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Other Health Professionals, Law Enforcement, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
University of the Sciences Private Traditional PA In 2017-18 students, faculty and public health professionals from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences participated in visiting 86 pharmacies in the areas of Philadelphia hardest hit by the opioid epidemic. The goal was to inform the pharmacists of the standing order in Pennsylvania to provide naloxone and encourage pharmacists to dispense naloxone. – University of the Sciences d.ventricelli@usciences.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Health Departments, Pharmacists, Legislation, Community Practice
University of the Sciences Private Traditional PA A pilot public health detailing intervention was conducted in April and May of 2017 in which students and faculty from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences visited 85 pharmacies with the goal of increasing pharmacists’ knowledge of naloxone and the standing order. The Philadelphia Regional Initiative for Education on Naloxone Dispensing (PHRIEND) aims to provide education to all community pharmacies across Philadelphia. Public health or academic detailing is a process in which experienced professionals visit health care providers to convey important public health messages or new recommendations by emphasizing in-person visits and providing useful educational materials and advising on concrete actions the providers can take. This approach has been shown to be effective in changing provider behavior. Philadelphia’s department of public health (PDPH), Community Behavioral Health(CBH) and the department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disability Services (DBHIDS) in partnership with Prevention Point Philadelphia and 3 colleges of Pharmacy - University of the Sciences, Thomas Jefferson University and Temple University, have collaborated to conduct a public health detailing effort designed to reach every pharmacy in Philadelphia. A direct messaging strategy to the leadership of large retail pharmacy chains in the Philadelphia area will occur simultaneously. This strategy will involve presenting data and tools to pharmacy managers and other decision makers that align with the educational information being provided to front line community pharmacists; with the goal of maximizing buy-in from pharmacy leadership that will ensure that naloxone is stocked, and accessible without barriers, in pharmacies across Philadelphia. – University of the Sciences d.ventricelli@usciences.edu Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Pharmacists, Community Practice, Health Departments, Naloxone, Legislation, Multiple School Collaboration, Public Outreach, Non-profit Partner(s)
University of the Sciences Private Traditional PA The Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences offers a substance use disorder elective course that provides an in-depth exploration of different substance use disorders and includes SBIRT training. – University of the Sciences g.downs@iusciences.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Student Pharmacists, IPE, Didactic, SBIRT, Other Health Profession Students
University of the Sciences Private Traditional PA Student research at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences addresses substance use disorders. These research activities were developed primarily through a research design elective course at University of the Sciences. Students are assigned faculty mentors to design and ultimately execute their research projects. Student research areas include substance use disorder, communication behavior between pharmacists and MAT providers, surveys of methadone treatment programs and naloxone training. – University of the Sciences d.ventricelli@usciences.edu Research Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Naloxone, MAT, Survey Research
University of the Sciences Private Traditional PA The Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences incorporates a one hour guest speaker pharmacist in recovery into a third-professional year student pharmacist course. The class of student pharmacists essentially interviews the speaker using the DAST-10 screening tool. The speaker then responds to each question as they are presented by the student pharmacists and elaborates on the response. The screening tool drives the discussion and provides the speaker with a unique way of telling their story of substance use and recovery. At the completion of the 1 hour course the student pharmacists have utilized a screening tool and the speaker's story has been extremely moving to the student pharmacists. – University of the Sciences d.ventricelli@usciences.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Pharmacists, Didactic, Impaired Health Professionals, Substance Use Disorder, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
Larkin University Private Accelerated FL The Larkin University College of Pharmacy includes lectures on pain management and substance abuse related to opioids in its curriculum. – Larkin University kjackson@ularkin.org Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management
University of Washington Public Traditional WA The University of Washington School of Pharmacy has a required core course for all second-professional year student pharmacists on chemical dependency, as well as elective courses. The required course has been included in the curriculum since 1997, and the elective course since 1990. The courses include naloxone training, needle/syringe exchange and medication assisted treatment options for opioid use disorder. – University of Washington kedzm@uw.edu Education Didactic, Harm Reduction, Naloxone, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pain/Pain Management, MAT, Student Pharmacists
University of Washington Public Traditional WA The University of Washington School of Pharmacy has a Curricular Enhancement in Chemical Dependency (13 quarter credits) which also includes an Advacned Pharmacy PRactice Experience (APPE) with exposure to medication assisted treatment (MAT), drug courts, abstinence-based treatment options and needle exchange. This Curricular Enhancement also covers pain management in this series as well as in pharmacotherapeutics courses. – University of Washington Not provided Education Didactic, Harm Reduction, Naloxone, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pain/Pain Management, MAT, Experiential, Student Pharmacists
University of Washington Public Traditional WA In May 2018 the University of Washington School of Pharmacy held an interprofessional health fair on campus and collaborated with the county to distribute naloxone kits and provide overdose prevention education. – University of Washington Not provided Research University Wide Community, Public Outreach, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone
Midwestern University/Downers Grove Private Traditional IL Midwestern University/Downers Grove Chicago College of Pharmacy offers Interdisciplinary and Pharmacy Curriculum Enhancements to incorporate substance use disorder. In devising a way to incorporate screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) as a tool for pharmacist to identify people at high risk of substance use disorder, the college identified many areas within the curriculum that could be enhanced to address substance use disorder. With the support of the Dean, Chair, and faculty the college was able to establish a comprehensive longitudinal format for substance use disorder exposure to prepare student pharmacists to provide patient-centered care when in practice. – Midwestern University/Downers Grove ttran@midwestern.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, SBIRT, Non-Profit Funding, Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Other Health Profession Students, Associations/Societies, IPE
Midwestern University/Downers Grove Private Traditional IL The Midwestern University/Downers Grove Chicago College of Pharmacy Nalox-Now Program trains campus personnel and community members on naloxone use and was initiated by the college's APhA GenRx Student Chapter. The Nalox-Now program trains participants to recognize signs of an opioid overdose, to administer naloxone to individuals in need and to properly store the naloxone. – Midwestern University/Downers Grove scorne@midwestern.edu; ttran@midwestern.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Non-profit Funding, Generation RX, Public Outreach, University Wide Community, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Associations/Societies
Midwestern University/Downers Grove Private Traditional IL Midwestern University was approved by the Illinois Department of Public Health to be a Drug Overdose Prevention Program (DOPP). Illinois law permits trained personnel to obtain, possess, and administer naloxone to any person who appears to be suffering an opioid-related overdose, and all Midwestern University student pharmacists will graduate as certified naloxone trainers by the year 2020. – Midwestern University/Downers Grove scorne@midwestern.edu; ttran@midwestern.edu Education Naloxone, Health Departments, Student Pharmacists, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
Midwestern University/Downers Grove Private Traditional IL A faculty member at Midwestern University/Downers Grove Chicago College of Pharmacy serves as the Substance Use Intervention Team Clinical Pharmacist at Rush University Medical Center. Rush University Medical Center received a State Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis grant, authorized by the 21st Century Cures Act, to start an addiction medicine consult service and clinic. – Midwestern University/Downers Grove ttran@midwestern.edu Practice Pharmacists, SBIRT, MAT, Naloxone, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Federal Government, Government Funding, Health-Systems
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV The West Virginia Attorney General’s office called the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy and asked Dean Easton to recommend a practicing pharmacist with at least 15 years of experience that could help serve as an “expert witness” to help with a case involving a pharmacy that was being sued by the state. The pharmacy is accused of filling prescriptions that lacked a legitimate medical purpose and were likely being diverted for illegal use. A faculty member visited the AG’s office and discussed the case with them and provided a detailed review of dispensing records for the past seven years. Based on the review, the faculty member agreed that the pharmacy failed to uphold the expected principles of medical professionals (and pharmacists specifically), as well violating its duty to use due care to protect the citizens of West Virginia. As such, the faculty member agreed to complete a “screening certificate of merit” which was required by state law to pursue charges against the pharmacy. This partnership began in August 2018 and continues forward. – University of Charleston gannettmonk@ucwv.edu Education Law Enforcement, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Opioid Prescribing, Community Practice
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV Naloxone trainings are held weekly at the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department by a University of Charleston School of Pharmacy faculty member. The purpose of these trainings is to educate the public regarding the indication, proper use, administration, and adverse effects of naloxone when used to reverse an opioid overdose. Within this training, attendees are taught how to recognize an opioid overdose, which individuals are at the highest risk of an opioid overdose and the importance of calling 911 as well as performing rescue breathing. At the completion of training, attendees are often provided with a kit to keep with them in the event that they witness an opioid overdose. To date, 315 known lives have been saved from this initiative. In addition to weekly trainings, several have been held at external locations such as church groups, community events, and recovery centers.In December of 2015, the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department began a Harm Reduction Program in which syringes, clean equipment, testing, access to recovery, and education were provided to participants of the program. The program was in need of volunteers from the healthcare field. At this time, a faculty member added the Harm Reduction Clinic as a clinic site for educating the public, assisting with interviewing participants, offering services (recovery, testing, etc.), and involving student pharmacists in the process. In May of 2016, the program had grown and naloxone kits were donated to KCHD to be distributed to the public. At that time, only the physician (Health Officer) was able to dispense. The pharmacist provided the naloxone class and the physician dispensed. In July of 2016, legislation was passed allowing pharmacists to dispense without a prescription. At this time, the pharmacist/faculty member continued to offer the class along weekly. Other faculty members became involved in the clinic through the life of the program. In March of 2018, the program was suspended, however, weekly naloxone classes have continued. – University of Charleston lindsayacree@ucwv.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Harm Reduction, Naloxone, Health Departments, For-profit Funding, Non-profit Funding, Multiple School Collaboration, Harm Reduction, For-profit Funding, For-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Partner(s), Other Health Professionals, Public Outreach
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV Since December of 2017, Cardinal Health donated naloxone nasal kits to the school of pharmacy, through the Great Rivers Harm Reduction Coalition. The program offers naloxone to first responders including law enforcement, security officers, criminal investigators, parole officers, day reports, health departments, department of corrections, and others that may be considered first responders. On occasion, a pharmacy faculty member provides trainings to first responders, prior to distribution. All first responders receiving these kits must be trained prior to distribution (either by an in house trainer or one provided by the school of pharmacy). – University of Charleston lindsayacree@ucwv.edu Service Harm Reduction, For-profit Funding, Naloxone, For-profit Partner(s), First Responders, Law Enforcement, Health Departments, Non-profit Partner(s)
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV Naloxone bracelets were created by a pharmacy faculty member to serve as aless expensive alternative to a medical alert bracelet. The bracelet is silver to represent overdose awareness and reads, “I HAVE NALOXONE – IF NOT BREATHING CALL 911 & ADMINISTER IF ABLE”. The purpose of this initiative is to provide these bracelets to anyone receiving naloxone or anyone that has received naloxone in the past. – University of Charleston lindsayacree@ucwv.edu Service Naloxone, Health Departments, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Substance Use Disorder, Internal Funding, Harm Reduction
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV The school of pharmacy partnered with the Charleston Police Department to conduct naloxone training for Junior Cadets attending a summer camp hosted by CPD. In addition, student pharmacists are trained several times throughout pharmacy school. Naloxone and overdose education is incorporated in a first-professional year pharmacy course, during a lab simulation, in a third-professional year pharmacotherapy course, and heavily covered in an elective course focused upon substance use disorders. Furthermore, several first responders have been trained through a Train-the-Trainer program to allow them to train other first responders in their division. Also, beginning in April 2018, pharmacy faculty will begin teaching naloxone training to University of Charleston Physician Assistant students. – University of Charleston lindsayacree@ucwv.edu Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Health Departments, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Law Enforcement, Substance Use Disorder, For-profit Funding, First Responders, Didactic, Other Health Profession Students, Public Outreach, Harm Reduction
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV A three hour elective course offered to second-professional year student pharmacists. The purpose of this course is to discuss substance use disorders and to go into more detail regarding drugs of abuse, both prescription and illicit drugs. Guest speakers from the DEA, former Charleston Police Officers, and others are included in the course to provide other perspectives to the epidemic. – University of Charleston lindsayacree@ucwv.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Law Enforcement, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Didactic, Opioid Trends, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV The school of pharmacy partnered with the DEA, Charleston Police Department, and campus security to offer a drop-off site for unused or unwanted medications. The purpose of this event is to provide the public with a safe and responsible method for disposing of unwanted or unused medication and providing education regarding safe medication use, disposal, and abuse. – University of Charleston lindsayacree@ucwv.edu Service Drug-Take Back, Law Enforcement, Drug Disposal, Federal Government, Public Outreach, Student Pharmacists
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV In 2016, the school of pharmacy piloted Generation Rx outreach in six elementary schools throughout Kanawha County in 12 classrooms reaching 219 students in 5th grade. A medication disposal system was ent home with each student along with educational materials to share with their parents. Pre- and post-assessments were administered to every student to assess the level of knowledge gained from the program. Data indicated that fifth grade may be too late to address the issues related to prescription misuse and medication safety. Therefore, the program was redesigned by the Kanawha County Schools and Kanawha Communities That Care for delivery in 3rd grade classrooms. – University of Charleston susangardner@ucwv.edu Education, Service Generation RX, Elementary School Students, Drug Disposal, For-profit Funding, For-profit Partner(s), Health Departments, Student Pharmacists
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV The school of pharmacy partnered with Murphy Media, Kanawha County Schools, and Kanawha Communities That Care to deliver a medication safety pilot program to ten pre-kindergarten classes throughout Kanawha County. The program aims to teach pre-k students about medication safety including how to properly store medication and dispose of prescriptions (with the help of a trusted adult). – University of Charleston susangardner@ucwv.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Elementary School Students, Law Enforcement, Federal Government, Non-profit Partner(s), For-profit Funding, Public Outreach, Multiple School Collaboration
University of Charleston Private Traditional WV Fellows (student pharmacists) of the school of pharmacy are working with the West Virginia Department of Corrections and the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR) to plan and execute a program designed to educate female inmates about the many problems that can occur in a newborn baby exposed to addictive illegal or prescription drugs while in the mother’s womb. Student pharmacists are trained to educate the women about the availability of long-acting reversible contraceptives (VLARC) for preventing pregnancy that may potentially result in a Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) baby. – University of Charleston susangardner@ucwv.edu Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Law Enforcement, Health Departments, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN Launched in 2015 at the College of Pharmacy and School of Medicine in Duluth, pharmacy and medical students participate in a opioids case based activity to review cases of opioid-dependent de-identified patients. This activity allows for a rich discussion of the social determinants of health and has improved interprofessional dialogue. – University of Minnesota khager@umn.edu Education Other Health Profession Students, Student Pharmacists, Other Faculty, Ipe, Didactic, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN Student pharmacist advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) at a drug court, which began in 2014 when a faculty member began working as a Clinical Consultant on the Carlton County Drug Court Team. – University of Minnesota lpalombi@d.umn.edu Education Experiential, Student Pharmacists, Law Enforcement, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Multiple School Collaboration, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN Unsure – University of Minnesota lpalombi@d.umn.edu Education Harm Reduction, Student Pharmacists, Naloxone
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN First-professional year student pharmacists are introduced to the critical role of the pharmacist in the opioid crisis in their first weeks of class in "Becoming a Pharmacist" - an introductory course they take before they begin the Pharm.D curriculum. – University of Minnesota lpalombi@d.umn.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Didactic
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN As part of the University of Minnesota's "1Health" curriculum, that brings together students from pharmacy, dentistry, medicine, veterinary school, social work, and nursing, first-professional year student pharmacists are assigned an addiction related case that is discussed with other health professional students. – University of Minnesota drbsick@umn.edu Education Student Pharmacists, IPE, Other Health Profession Students, Didactic, Other Health Professionals
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN Beginning in 2014, lecture on naloxone in Biopharmaceutics Course, in which different forms of naloxone are reviewed in a biopharmaceutics context. Student pharmacists are given the opportunity to handle each dosage form to become intimately familiar with specific dosing considerations. Also discussed are the pros/cons of the different dosage forms and important counseling points for each dosage form. – University of Minnesota lpalombi@d.umn.edu; hblue@d.umn.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Naloxone
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN Launched in the Fall of 2017, a Statewide Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis Grant with St. Louis County Work plan that focuses on increasing naloxone distribution in the community, institutions of higher education, and in health care. – University of Minnesota lpalombi@d.umn.edu Service Non-profit Partner(s), Health Departments, Other Health Professionals, Naloxone, Non-profit Partner(s), Government Funding, Harm Reduction
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN Partnership between the college of pharmacy and the University of Minnesota Extension on USDA/NIFA Rural Health and Safety Grant to address the opioid crisis. This project seeks to assess and develop recovery capital, and will include community forums, focus groups, and the training of a local group of leaders in a leadership cohort. – University of Minnesota lpalombi@d.umn.edu Education Government Funding, Health Departments, Federal Government, Public Outreach
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN Since 2015, the college of pharmacy has partnered with rural and tribal communities to plan and implement community forums focused on the opioid crisis. Forums have brought together between 40 and 250 people per rural/tribal community. – University of Minnesota lpalombi@d.umn.edu Education Non-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Funding, Public Outreach, Internal Funding, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Substance Use Disorder
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN With the understanding that rural/independent and small chain pharmacies were in need of additional support in establishing naloxone protocols, pharmacy faculty and student pharmacists determined which pharmacies in St. Louis and Carlton counties desired assistance with protocols, and assisted/supported those pharmacies in getting signed protocols and pharmacy procedures in place. – University of Minnesota lpalombi@d.umn.edu Service Student Pharmacists, Health Departments, Pharmacists, Community Practice, Naloxone, Harm Reduction
The University of Louisiana at Monroe Public Traditional LA APhA-ASP Generation Rx provides community education and awareness of the opioid epidemic in local health fairs and through social media campaigns. Furthermore, Generation Rx has spoken to local elementary and middle schools, as well as Greek organizations at our institution. Most activities began as a result of student pharmacist and pharmacy faculty involvement in the APhA Institute. – The University of Louisiana at Monroe shill@ulm.edu Education Generation RX, Public Outreach, Elementary School Students, Secondary School Students, Student Pharmacists, Non-profit Partner(s)
The University of Louisiana at Monroe Public Traditional LA The college of pharmacy and Generation Rx have been directly involved with the planning, promotion, and staffing of local drug take back days. – The University of Louisiana at Monroe Not provided Service Generation RX, Student Pharmacists, Drug-Take Back
The University of Louisiana at Monroe Public Traditional LA The college of pharmacy offers targeted education to those who are directly involved with the opioid crisis. This includes giving presentations to first responders, law enforcement officers, and family medicine residents, as well as continuing education presentations to veterinarians and pharmacists on the opioid epidemic. – The University of Louisiana at Monroe Not provided Education Other Faculty, Law Enforcement, Other Health Professionals, Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Continuing Education, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, First Responders
The University of Louisiana at Monroe Public Traditional LA The college of pharmacy has routinely sent student pharmacists and faculty to the APhA Institute on Alcohol and Drug Dependencies over the last 10 plus years to learn more about the opioid epidemic. – The University of Louisiana at Monroe Not provided Education Associations/Societies, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
University of North Texas Health Science Center Public Traditional TX In June 2018, a college of pharmacy faculty member presented a one hour lecture to preceptors in the Dallas/Forth Worth area discussing combating the opioid epidemic. The purpose of the lecture was to provide our preceptors a current status update of the epidemic, naloxone standing orders in Texas, and how pharmacists can play a role. – University of North Texas Health Science Center jessica.gardea@unthsc.edu Education Pharmacists, Naloxone, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
University of North Texas Health Science Center Public Traditional TX College of pharmacy faculty review pain management and the opioid epidemic for 1 hour, within every block, with 4th year APPE students on their ambulatory care rotation. – University of North Texas Health Science Center Not provided Education Student Pharmacists, Experiential, Pain/Pain Management, Ambulatory Care Practice, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
The University of Georgia Public Traditional GA College of pharmacy offers a three hour online Continuing Professional Education / Continuing Medical Education (CPE/CME) on controlled substance prescribing and dispensing with a focus on opioids for chronic pain. Content is based on the CDC guidelines and incorporates roles of physicians and pharmacists in addressing the opioid epidemic. The program has also been offered as a live event three times. – The University of Georgia tvonwald@uga.edu Education Continuing Education, Other Health Professionals, Pharmacists, Guidelines, Health-Systems, Non-profit Funding, Non-profit Partner(s), Opioid Prescribing, Pain/Pain Management, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
Chapman University Private Accelerated CA Collaboration between the school of pharmacy and Mission Hospital Laguna Beach Pharmacy Department and Chemical Dependency Detoxification and Rehabilitation Programs, that began in 2016 to provide weekly medication education groups. These 50-minute medication education groups are conducted by pharmacy faculty and students. Interactive medication groups were developed to increase patients’ medication knowledge and minimize any misunderstanding about the medications used for chemical detoxification and associated withdrawal symptoms. After each medication education group, students are assigned to get a thorough medication history for individualized education and follow-up with the patients. Students also learned about the impact of the opioid epidemic on people’s lives and the important steps to help each individual succeed in recovery. – Chapman University mgutierr@chapman.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Non-profit Partner(s), Health-Systems, Public Outreach, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
Nova Southeastern University Private Traditional FL Launched in 2010, the college of pharmacy initiated research to combat the opioid crisis. This research was specifically aimed to develop technologies that could be utilized in opioid medications to effectively deter their abuse when manipulated. Over the past 8 years, the College of Pharmacy has developed more than 10 novel technologies that can very effectively deter opioid abuse under a wide range of manipulation conditions for abuse by injection and snorting. This research is now being continued to further develop technologies that can help deterring abuse via oral overdose and overconsumption. – Nova Southeastern University omidian@nova.edu Research Student Pharmacists, , Abuse Deterrent Opioid Formulation, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Non-profit Funding, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
Mercer University Private Traditional GA The college of pharmacy trains student pharmacists on how to use naloxone and where to get naloxone so they are able to go into the community and teach others such as at rehabilitation centers and paramedics. This training occurs in service learning activities as well as in classes and labs. – Mercer University elliott_jb@mercer.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Associations/Societies, Didactic,
Mercer University Private Traditional GA A faculty member at the Mercer University College of Pharmacy is currently evaluating new treatments for opioids in the laboratory based on CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonism and using intranasal delivery and nanotechnology. – Mercer University murnane_ks@mercer.edu Research Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Non-profit Partner(s), Internal Funding
Mercer University Private Traditional GA College of pharmacy faculty conduct yearly activity in Muscoskeletal Disorders and Pain course related to opioid abuse and overdose and teaches opioids yearly in Nervous System Disorders II and Musculoskeletal Disorders and Pain courses. In addition, a faculty member gave a lecture to the Georgia Chapter of the American Chemical Society in September 2018. – Mercer University murnane_ks@mercer.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pain/Pain Management, Didactic, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Student Pharmacists
Mercer University Private Traditional GA Lecture on the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of opioid withdrawal and dependence. This includes acute inpatient care as well as maintenance outpatient care and the counseling of medications including but not limited to: naltrexone, naloxone, methadone and others. The goal is for pharmacy students to effectively make recommendations to what agent is appropriate in treating opioid dependence and accompanying patient counseling on these agents. There is also an elective course over Substance Abuse including opioids and other substances of abuse. This online elective is discussion based where student pharmacists are assigned chat rooms with prompts to discuss controversial topics over substance abuse. This is followed by a self-reflection on assigned topic. Patients in the elective course are required to attend either an AA or NA meeting and write about their experience. The final project of the elective course is to make an educational pamphlet counseling high school students on selected abused substance including opioids – Mercer University mayberry_km@mercer.edu Education Secondary School Students, Naloxone, Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Substance Use Disorder, Public Outreach
Mercer University Private Traditional GA Launched in the Fall of 2016, educational session in Disorders of the Musculoskeletal System and Pain Management course, in which the Director of the Georgia Drugs and Narcotics agency speaks to the class in a question/answer format regarding the opioid crisis in Georgia, medication diversion, the role of the pharmacist, and impaired pharmacists. – Mercer University marshall_l@mercer.edu Education Pain/Pain Management, Drug Diversion, Law Enforcement, Didactic, Pharmacists, Student Pharmacists, Opioid Trends
Mercer University Private Traditional GA College of pharmacy faculty member was part of a NIDA grant to Verde Environmental Technologies for developing a kit to deactivate residual opiate drugs. – Mercer University wfowler@deterrasystem.com Research Government Funding, Federal Government, Drug Disposal, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
Mercer University Private Traditional GA Two class periods in the Practice of Pharmacy course address the problem of drug diversion, the role of the pharmacist in recognizing and responding to possible drug diversion, the issue of the corresponding responsibility of the pharmacist in preventing drug diversion, and the issues around impaired health care professionals. During these classes, the public health issue of drug diversion is discussed, the laws and regulations related to the dispensing of controlled substances are reviewed and discussed, the "Red Flags" video produced by NABP is shown and discussed, and students complete a written activity on these issues to further their appreciation for these issues . A member of the Georgia Board of Pharmacy speaks with the class about the problem of drug diversion; a certified addiction counselor who works with impaired healthcare professionals speaks with the class and one or more recovering professionals share there experience with diversion and addiction with the class. The students complete a written "reflection" on these presentations. – Mercer University miller_sw@mercer.edu Education Drug Diversion, Student Pharmacists, State Board of Pharmacy, Substance Use Disorder, Impaired Health Professionals, Didactic, Associations/Societies, Pharmacists
Mercer University Private Traditional GA Patient care based activity in Practice of Pharmacy course that focuses on roles of the pharmacist in pain management and substance abuse prevention. The objectives for the activity include: Identifying non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic alternatives to opioid therapy for the treatment of pain, listing appropriate counseling points for patients initiating opioid therapy, reviewing important concepts of safe and effective opioid use through patient cases, identifying risk factors and signs and symptoms of opioid overdose and describe strategies to decrease the risk of opioid overdose and death, and discussing naloxone rescue therapy with regard to the specific products available, their appropriate use, and important counseling points. Students are provided with patient cases and asked to answer questions in groups related to the above objectives within a simulated patient encounter and are also encouraged to use the CDC guidelines regarding opioid therapy. There are plans to transition this activity to a team-based learning session and remove activity components related to naloxone therapy, as this is covered in a Muscoskeletal module during the third professional year and Pharmacotherapy Case conference during the fourth professional year. – Mercer University miller_sw@mercer.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Pain/Pain Management, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, Guidelines
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI APhA-ASP Generation Rx committee completes prescription drug abuse education presentations for local schools and participates in official DEA drug take back days as a drop off site. – Concordia University Wisconsin audrey.kostrzewa@cuw.edu Education, Service Generation RX, Health Departments, Elementary School Students, Secondary School Students, Law Enforcement, Drug-Take Back, Student Pharmacists, Associations/Societies, Public Outreach
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI Big Pharma-Sales, Marketing, and Cultural Impact elective has students read Dreamland (investigative journalism book detailing the history of America's opioid epidemic), and students complete an Academic Detailing Project to present to healthcare providers on the opioid crisis. – Concordia University Wisconsin michael.oldani@cuw.edu Education Didactic, Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Student Pharmacists
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) in third-professional year student pharmacists at a Veterans AODA and mental health court where substance use is addressed. Additionally, another IPPE at Ozaukee County Behavioral Health Clinic that manages a Vivitrol Clinic. – Concordia University Wisconsin michael.oldani@cuw.edu Education, Practice Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Health Departments, Student Pharmacists, Experiential, Non-profit Partner(s), Federal Government, MAT
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI A faculty member at Concordian University Wisconsin School of Pharmacy has a research program focused on developing novel tools to treat pain, stress, anxiety, substance use disorder and dependence. This program led to the discovery of benzylideneoxymorphone (BOM) which is a mu partial agonist/delta antagonist that may be used to treat pain with an improved safety profile over mu-selective agonists. Further research has altered BOM to produce less tolerance on chronic administration, developed CB1 receptor allosteric modulators that block diverse substance use disorders without severe psychiatric side effects of CB1 antagonists, and discovered a dopamine D4-selective antagonist that may have utility in treating SUDs. – Concordia University Wisconsin chris.cunningham@cuw.edu Research Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pain/Pain Management, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Abuse Deterrent Opioid Formulation
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI Three hour pain unit in Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry course, guest opioid panel of medical and pharmacy residents who discuss clinical cases related to opioids, 1.5 hour lecture on neural mechanisms and chemistry of substance abuse and dependence, take home case study that reviews chemistry/pharmacology of pain/substance abuse, Medicinal Natural Products elective and discussion on kratom, ziconotide, and potential role in treating opioid use disorder and pain. – Concordia University Wisconsin chris.cunningham@cuw.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Pain/Pain Management, Substance Use Disorder, Pharmacy Residents
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI In the summer of 2017, the school of pharmacy hosted 10 high school students as part of Summer SMART, which was supported by the 500 Stars Initiative (clinical and Translational Sciences Institute. The goal of the program was to get students interested in pursuing STEM careers and studying the opioid crisis. Students in the program were placed into three teams and presented their work regarding discovery of potential small molecule tools that bind opioid receptors. – Concordia University Wisconsin chris.cunningham@cuw.edu Education Secondary School Students, Student Pharmacists, Non-profit Partner(s), Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Non-profit Funding
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI School of pharmacy faculty attended advocacy day in DC advocating for increased funding for the NIH, NIDA and the opioid crisis. – Concordia University Wisconsin chris.cunningham@cuw.edu Advocacy Government Funding
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI In 2018, a Concordia University Wisconsin School of Pharmacy faculty member gave a podcast interview encouraging pharmacist involvement in treating opioid use disorder with medication assisted treatment on iforumRx, an interactive web community dedicated to evidence-based ambulatory pharmacy practice. The podcast Treating Opioid Use Disorder, Review of X:BOT trial material, and accompanying commentary were focused on the 2018 Lancet article, "Comparative effectiveness of extended-release naltrexone versus buprenorphine-naloxone for opioid relapse prevention (X:BOT): a multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled trial." – Concordia University Wisconsin jordan.wulz@cuw.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, MAT, Pharmacists, Ambulatory Care Practice
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI A pharmacy faculty member is undertaking a retrospective analysis of low-dose naltrexone in the treatment of fibromyalgia as an alternative to opioids. Working in a pain management clinic, the faculty member is aware that there are few effective pharmacotherapy options available for chronic pain, and previous studies of low dose naltrexone in the treatment of fibromyalgia have been promising. – Concordia University Wisconsin jordan.wulz@cuw.edu Research Pain/Pain Management
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI Pain management lecture series for third-professional year student pharmacists that includes eight hours of lecture on acute/chronic pain management, pain medications, fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, headaches, opioid conversions, and management of adverse drug reactions related to pain management pharmacotherapy. Most lectures have been converted to team-based learning. Additionally, 2 hours of lecture on substance use disorder, including naloxone formulation training and a drug abuse elective with a four week section on opioid use disorder and emerging opioids of abuse. Lastly, a one hour mental health applied patient care lab focused on substance use in healthcare providers. – Concordia University Wisconsin jordan.wulz@cuw.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pain/Pain Management, Impaired Health Professionals, Naloxone, Didactic, Student Pharmacists
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI Development of an elective Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) rotation in pain management/public health to be offered for the 2019-2020 year. Elective consists of two days in pain management clinic, two days working with a local health department on their opioid crisis efforts, one day shadowing Milwaukee Country Drug Treatment Court or working on projects for Ascension Wisconsin's Pain Council. – Concordia University Wisconsin jordan.wulz@cuw.edu Education Pain/Pain Management, Experiential, Health Departments, Student Pharmacists, Pharmacists, Non-profit Partner(s), Law Enforcement, PDMP
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI Ascension Wisconsin pain council bimonthly pain management newsletter/updates for providers that recently focused on naloxone co-prescribing indications and formulations of naloxone. – Concordia University Wisconsin jordan.wulz@cuw.edu Education Pain/Pain Management, Naloxone, Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Non-profit Partner(s)
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI A pharmacy faculty member planned and implemented a community wellness event with a focus on substance abuse in 2017. A pharmacy faculty member also served as one of our experts on a panel answering questions about the best ways to fight the opioid crisis as a community. – Concordia University Wisconsin jordan.wulz@cuw.edu Service Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Health Departments, Secondary School Students
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI Current events presentations by first-professional year student pharmacists in applied patient care lab with topics that include the opioid crisis and Heroin, Opiate, Prevention, and Education (HOPE) legislation. – Concordia University Wisconsin beth.buckley@cuw.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Legislation
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI De-prescribing initiative of opioids in geriatric clinic with student-run surveillance of BEERs list medications – Concordia University Wisconsin travis.suss@cuw.edu Practice Student Pharmacists, Opioid Prescribing
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI A Concordian University Wisconsin School of Pharmacy resident at Aurora Healthcare created an Emergency Department Opioid Alternative order set, mimicking the program established in New Jersey by the ALTO (Alternatives to Opioids) legislation. The order includes use of non-opioids as preferential for select emergency department indications including renal colic, headache, and back pain and resulted in significant reduction of opioid use after implementation. It is now rolled out across the entire system. – Concordia University Wisconsin emily.bryant@cuw.edu Research, Practice Pharmacy Residents, Pain/Pain Management, Health-Systems, Practice-Based Research
Concordia University Wisconsin Private Traditional WI 2018 elective on medication use for Pharm.D/MPH students has a section on the opioid crisis and how it relates to public health – Concordia University Wisconsin audrey.kostrzewa@cuw.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students
The University of Mississippi Public Traditional MS Collaborative research project to characterize the risk factors associated with overdose or serious opioid-induced respiratory depression among medical users of prescription opioids in a commercially insured population and to compare risk factor profiles between this group and the Veterans Health Administration population. – The University of Mississippi mbarnard@olemiss.edu Research For-profit Funding, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Other Health Professionals
Cedarville University Private Traditional OH The college of pharmacy will be hosting a bi-annual Pharmacy Advocacy Symposium in 2018. The focus of the symposium will be centered around combating the opioid crisis. Legislators and law enforcement representatives will be in attendance along with representatives from state professional organizations and each college of pharmacy in the state of Ohio. The day will include several panel discussions, lectures, and breakout sessions focused on the current and evolving role of the pharmacist in managing this epidemic. – Cedarville University zjenkins@cedarville.edu Education Law Enforcement, Multiple School Collaboration, Non-profit Funding, Public Outreach, Associations/Societies
Cedarville University Private Traditional OH Opioid pilot project from the National Association of County and City Health Officials and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (NACCHO/CDC Opioid Pilot Project), with an aim of changing prescription opioid prescribing patterns. Two student pharmacists were trained to provide academic detailing to physicians regarding evidence-based opioid prescribing practices. Following the training, the student pharmacists participated in piloting academic detailing calls and visits with physicians in Montgomery County, Ohio. – Cedarville University jwcole@cedarville.edu Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Opioid Prescribing, Associations/Societies, Health Departments, Government Funding, Federal Government
Cedarville University Private Traditional OH As part of a pilot research study regarding the use and effectiveness of opioid disposal bags, first year professional students on Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs) incorporate bags at their IPPE sites. The goal of the study is to help patients in the community as well as change perceptions. The project came out of a partnership between The Cedarville University School of Pharmacy, the Wright State Medical School and Generation Rx. – Cedarville University jwcole@cedarville.edu Research Experiential, Student Pharmacists, Drug Disposal, Multiple School Collaboration, Other Health Profession Students, Generation RX
Cedarville University Private Traditional OH The college of pharmacy has a GenerationRx initiative of APhA-ASP, that received grant funding from the Cardinal Health Foundation. The main objective of the 2017-2018 academic school year was to increase the amount of people educated about prescription drug misuse. Over the last year, Generation Rx had different events with Helping Our Young People Connect with God Organization (H.O.P.E.) and presentations at local elementary, middle, and high schools. – Cedarville University bpahl@cedarville.edu Education Generation RX, Elementary School Students, Secondary School Students, Non-profit Funding, Associations/Societies, Student Pharmacists
Cedarville University Private Traditional OH Launched in June 2018, an innovative project to determine the impact of pharmacist-led collaborative care with technology and motivational interviewing to improve patient engagement and chronic pain outcome began and the goal of the project is to morphine equivalents prescribed as well as improve pain management. Providers who participated in the project received an educational intervention, and then a team of pharmacists and student pharmacists engage patients to discuss and motivate them in achieving pain management goals. – Cedarville University amchen@cedarville.edu Education, Research Generation RX, Pain/Pain Management, Student Pharmacists, Pharmacists, Non-profit Funding, Associations/Societies
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX A college of pharmacy faculty member surveyed nearly 3,000 chain pharmacists in Texas to determine the accessibility of naloxone via standing order as phase 1 of a research program on pharmacists and naloxone. Targeted academic detailing and follow-up calls to assess change in a local subset will comprise phase 2 of the program. The results of the phase 1 study were published as a research letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association. – The University of Texas at Austin Evoy@uthscsa.edu Research Naloxone, Community Practice, Pharmacists, Survey Research
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX State level promotion of the Texas prescription drug monitoring program to prescribers and pharmacists in which a college of pharmacy faculty served as a consultant. – The University of Texas at Austin lucas.hill@austin.utexas.edu Service PDMP, Health Departments, Government Funding, Other Health Professionals, Pharmacists, Federal Government
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX Development of online continuing education for healthcare professionals regarding FDA-approved medications for opioid use disorder, in which a college of pharmacy faculty serves as the principal investigator. This activity, which was added in September 2018, supports an existing contract with the Texas Health and Human Services Commission that supports overdose prevention/naloxone continuing education. – The University of Texas at Austin lucas.hill@austin.utexas.edu Education Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, MAT, Naloxone, Health Departments, Government Funding, Continuing Education, Substance Use Disorder
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX Development of brief videos to educate the public regarding opioid overdose risk, ranging from addressing proper medication storage and preparation with naloxone to education regarding use of fentanyl test strips and dispelling myths regarding passive fentanyl exposure. This activity, which was added in September 2018, supports an existing contract with the Texas Health and Human Services Commission that supports overdose prevention/naloxone continuing education. – The University of Texas at Austin lucas.hill@austin.utexas.edu Education Health Departments, Government Funding, Naloxone, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Federal Government
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX Opioid overdose prevention service learning program for health professions students, initiated in the summer of 2016 by a faculty director and two student directors. First year of program focused on educating high-risk student groups (off-campus housing cooperatives) but has expanded to include high-risk community groups in multiple campus regions (Austin, San Antonio, Rio Grande Valley). There are plans to also expand to other college of pharmacy campuses in Texas (Houston, A&M). – The University of Texas at Austin lucas.hill@austin.utexas.edu Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Other Faculty, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, For-profit Partner(s), Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Non-profit Funding, IPE, Didactic, Harm Reduction
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX The college of pharmacy is a primary provider of statewide opioid overdose prevention training and naloxone distribution in Texas, as well as online continuing education program for healthcare professionals. In addition, the college of pharmacy also purchases various formulations of naloxone to prepare overdose prevention kits (also include other key harm reduction materials, including fentanyl test strips) which are distributed to community members, addiction treatment and recovery organizations, and first responders. Trainings were provided by a harm reduction expert. – The University of Texas at Austin lucas.hill@austin.utexas.edu Education, Service Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, Pharmacists, Continuing Education, Other Health Professionals, Government Funding, Health Departments, Federal Government, Associations/Societies, Non-profit Partner(s), Harm Reduction
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX Beginning in the summer of 2016, the University developed and implemented a collaborative model for opioid overdose preparedness on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. This includes the implementation of a standing order in the campus pharmacy, stocking naloxone in every residence hall, supplying it to campus police and training every resident advisor group and police officer to respond effectively to an opioid overdose. – The University of Texas at Austin lucas.hill@austin.utexas.edu Education, Service University Wide Community, Law Enforcement, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Health Departments, For-profit Funding, Naloxone, Continuing Education
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX Two medical students from the University of Texas Health San Antonio School of Medicine led an opioid overdose and naloxone use outreach project in South Texas. This involved obtainment of a grant, planning and presenting eight 1.5 hour long presentations in San Antonio and Corpus Christi, TX (some of which were accredited for nurses, physicians, pharmacists, and social workers). – The University of Texas at Austin evoy@uthscsa.edu Education, Service University Wide Community, Law Enforcement, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Health Departments, For-profit Funding, Naloxone, Continuing Education
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX In 2018, pharmacy faculty moderated a nationally live-streamed SAMHSA National Prevention Week Town Hall on youth opioid harm prevention that included panelists from SAMHSA, DEA, ONDCP, and leading academic institutions. – The University of Texas at Austin lucas.hill@austin.utexas.edu Education Law Enforcement, Federal Government
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX Ongoing research project that was started in 2017 that seeks to survey the availability of opioid-related continuing education programs provided by U.S. schools and colleges of pharmacy. – The University of Texas at Austin lucas.hill@austin.utexas.edu Research Survey Research, Continuing Education, Associations/Societies
The University of Texas at Austin Public Traditional TX Student-led advocacy committee was established in 2017 to advocate on expanding sterile syringe access and legalizing syringe exchange in Texas during the state legislative session. – The University of Texas at Austin lucas.hill@austin.utexas.edu Advocacy Student Pharmacists, Harm Reduction, Student Pharmacists, Legislation
Thomas Jefferson University Private Traditional PA Pharmacy faculty incorporated an introduction, application, and reinforcement of screening, brief intervention and referral for treatment (SBIRT) into the fourth year of the Pharm.D program in 2015. In addition, a full day symposium was created on the opioid epidemic. – Thomas Jefferson University roshni.patel@jefferson.edu Education SBIRT, IPE, Federal Government, Government Funding, For-profit Funding, Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Multiple School Collaboration, Didactic
Harding University Private Traditional AR All first, second, and third professional year student pharmacists provide Narcan counseling to a standardized patient in a patient skills center. In addition, didactic and elective coursework also address the opioid epidemic. Didactic coursework address the opioid epidemic in Law, Nervous System Pharmacotherapy & Med Chem/Pharmacology classes. Elective courses addressing Substance Use Disorder and Advocacy also address the opioid epidemic. The overall goal is to increase student pharmacist's understanding of the opioid epidemic and their role in addressing the problem through their profession. Furthermore, both faculty and staff attend the Arkansas Prescription Drug Abuse Summit. – Harding University jkissack@harding.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Substance Use Disorder, State Board of Pharmacy, Law Enforcement, Associations/Societies, State Government
University of Hawaii at Hilo Public Traditional HI Lecture on opioid use disorder, addiction, and opioid crisis in toxicology class, that was revamped in 2017. – University of Hawaii at Hilo chadkkaw@hawaii.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Didactic, Student Pharmacists
Ferris State University Public Traditional MI The University formed the Opioid Task Force to address the opioid crisis (through three constituencies - students, prescribers, and the broader community, which was initiated a year ago), through a collaborative discussion with the college of pharmacy, the college of health professions, the college of optometry and the college of arts and sciences. Formation of the Task Force was triggered by the alarming regional statistics and the realization that the crisis/epidemic was, without doubt, affecting the campus in various ways. – Ferris State University dursts@ferris.edu Service Student Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Public Outreach, Health-Systems, Health Departments, Other Faculty, Substance Use Disorder
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Public Traditional NY Students and faculty facilitators from medicine, dental medicine, nursing, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, social work, management, and law participated in a forum designed and implemented by interprofessional faculty from nine health professional schools within the University. The goal of forum was to create an experience for students to learn about with and from each other regarding professional roles and responsibilities and concepts of teamwork and team-based practice in the context of a major public health emergency. The objectives for the forum were: upon completion, students could describe the rise of opioid addiction; explain the reason why prevention and treatment of this problem must be addressed with an interprofessional team approach; describe the student’s own unique professional role and responsibilities as well as those of other providers within an interprofessional team; and, create a multifaceted prevention and treatment plan for opioid addiction with their interprofessional team members based on the case reviewed. – University at Buffalo, The State University of New York nmfusco@buffalo.edu Education IPE, Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Health Departments, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
Touro University California Private Traditional CA As part of experiential education rotations beginning in January 2018, student pharmacists provide presentations to middle school and high school students, as well as parent teacher association (PTA) meetings, on how certain prescriptions and non-prescription drugs result in tolerance, addiction and dependence. Material for the presentation were adapted from materials available from the National Institute on Drug Abuse but modernized and inclusive of local/regional examples from the media. This presentation provides a 'basic pharmacology' lesson on how these drugs work in the brain, including highlights as to which brain areas are activated, thus why some drugs cause certain effects, and not others. It is meant to be an alternative to approaches centered on scare tactics and statistics. The presentations also include information about storage and disposal of medication. – Touro University California shane.desselle@tu.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Secondary School Students, Substance Use Disorder, Drug Disposal, Public Outreach
Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Private Traditional NY Beginning in Spring 2016, the college of pharmacy collaborated with the Albany Medical College to train students in screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) with a combination of videos, live lectures, and role playing to stimulate the demonstrated activity. – Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences robert.hamilton@acphs.edu Education Student Pharmacists, SBIRT, Other Health Profession Students, IPE, Didactic
Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Private Traditional NY Student pharmacists are educated in the use of naloxone to reduce opiate overdose within the pharmacy skills lab sequence. – Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences jane.boyd@acphs.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Naloxone, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Private Traditional NY In collaboration with the police department, the college of pharmacy participates in drug take back events. – Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences jane.boyd@acphs.edu Service Drug-Take Back, Law Enforcement
Shenandoah University Private Traditional VA Narcan training and screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) training in a Pharmacist Patient Care Process (PPCP) lab course that was incorporated into the curriculum in Spring 2018. – Shenandoah University nscheinb@su.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Naloxone, SBIRT
Shenandoah University Private Traditional VA Beginning in 2015, pharmacy faculty conducted Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral for Treatment (SBIRT) as a co-curricular, interprofessional activity for third-professional year student pharmacists. Motivational interviewing and SBIRT have been incorporated into a psychiatry therapeutics model and into a patient care laboratory module. Plans are currently in place to incorporate the SBIRT into a skills check list for the APPE year. In addition, there are plans to develop a faculty position in substance use disorders and behavioral health as an outpatient position. – Shenandoah University jfo2@su.edu Education Student Pharmacists, SBIRT, Naloxone, Government Funding, Didactic, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Experiential
Pacific University Oregon Private Accelerated OR Student pharmacists complete a 1.25 credit continuing education course, provided by the Boston University School of Medicine. Successful completion of the course is required to pass the Neuro/Psych II didactic block in the Pharm.D program. – Pacific University Oregon cawleyp@pacificu.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Continuing Education, Health Departments, Naloxone, Didactic, Opioid Prescribing, Pain/Pain Management
Pacific University Oregon Private Accelerated OR In 2016, when the state of Oregon introduced pharmacist naloxone prescribing, a lecture on the opioid crisis, including Oregon law, naloxone prescribing, opioid kinetics review, socioeconomic impact, was introduced into the student pharmacist curriculum. – Pacific University Oregon cawleyp@pacificu.edu Education Naloxone, Didactic, Student Pharmacists
Fairleigh Dickinson University Private Traditional NJ As part of an annual substance abuse research elective at the school of pharmacy, student pharmacists go out to the main campus of the University to hold an education campaign for other students. Materials for the campaign are sourced from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and student pharmacists create their own posters for presentation. – Fairleigh Dickinson University iwuchuof@fdu.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Didactic, Public Outreach, University Wide Community,
Fairleigh Dickinson University Private Traditional NJ In 2017, Fairleigh Dickinson University conducted a public opinion research poll regarding views and opinions on opioid use and misuse. – Fairleigh Dickinson University mavaltro@fdu.edu Research Survey Research, For-profit Funding, Non-profit Partner(s), Substance Use Disorder,
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD A 1.25 hour continuing education course for physicians that addresses medication safety and reduction of risks in the management of controlled substances and responsibilities for physicians, podiatrists, and dentists who are dispensing in Maryland. Course was approved by ACCME and ACPE and was collaborated in collaboration with the Maryland State Medical Society and has had 81 health professionals take the course since its launch. – University of Maryland jmattingly@rx.umaryland.edu Education Continuing Education, Other Health Professionals, Associations/Societies, IPE, Opioid Prescribing
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD A continuing education course developed for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians on treating opioid use disorder with buprenorphine/naloxone and buprenorphine/naloxone non medical use and diversion. Course was offered in both webinar and online formats. – University of Maryland bdipaula@rx.umaryland.edu Education Buprenorphine, Naloxone, For-profit Funding, Continuing Education, Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, MAT, Drug Diversion,
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD Launched in 2017, a continuing education course on dispensing opioids was created to improve medication safety and explain physician dispensing restrictions and requirements set by Maryland state law. In addition, alternative options to opioid therapy, assessing and managing the risk of these therapies, and a discussion of treatment agreements was also covered in the course. – University of Maryland fshaya@rx.umaryland.edu Education PDMP, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Other Health Professionals, Continuing Education, Pain/Pain Management, Associations/Societies, Health Departments
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD Faculty at the school of pharmacy serve on the Statewide Epidemiological Outcomes Workgroup (SEOW), which provides state substance abuse prevention and treatment providers, policy makers, researchers, and citizens with information about the consumption, risk factors, and consequences associated with alcohol, tobacco, and drug use in Maryland. The SEOW utilizes data to: 1. Determine prevention and treatment priorities at the state, county, and local levels; 2. Identify, monitor, and interpret key indicators of use and consequences of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs; 3. Support the state and jurisdictions as they assess need, develop interventions, implement and evaluate prevention and treatment efforts; 4. Conduct and disseminate rigorous research on substance use policy, prevention, and outcomes . – University of Maryland lsimoniw@rx.umaryland.edu Research Government Funding, Opioid Trends, State Government, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD As a result of Maryland legislation, passed in 2018, that requires general hospice care programs to establish a written policy for the collection and disposal of unused prescription medications, pharmacy faculty developed a continuing education course on end of life care and safe disposal expired or unwanted drugs. – University of Maryland mmcphers@rx.umaryland.edu Education, Advocacy Drug Disposal, Legislation, State Government, Pain/Pain Management, Continuing Education, For-profit Funding
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD Researchers at the school of pharmacy created a pain medication that acts on two opioid receptors, without abuse liability. Opioid receptors are G protein-coupled receptors located in the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, and gastrointestinal tract. To date, three opioid receptor subtypes have been identified: mu, delta and kappa. The new pain medication blocks delta, which prevents the receptor from adjusting to high levels of mu activation, leading to tolerance and dependence. – University of Maryland acoop@rx.umaryland.edu Research Pain/Pain Management, Non-profit Partner(s), State Government
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD Formed in 2017 and directed by school of pharmacy faculty members, the Center for Addiction Research, Education, and Services (CARE) addresses the adverse impact of addiction on individuals, families, communities, and society. The center aims to advance addiction-related science and service through prevention, treatment, and initiatives in four core areas: Workforce development and community based training and technical assistance, development of innovative models and systems of care, translational faculty research and improved surveillance and prediction, and policy analysis development and education. – University of Maryland rlove@rx.umaryland.edu Education, Research, Service, Advocacy Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Public Outreach, Internal Funding, IPE, Continuing Education, Practice-Based Research, Opioid Trends, Legislation
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD Utilizing a relieving acute pain (RAP) study, a school of pharmacy faculty member developed phone based applications to relieve traumatic pain and prevent substance use with the goal of comparing standard opioid prescriptions to a novel method of placebo based tapering in short and long term use of opioids, as well as creating a national model to reduce the number of patients who become addicted to narcotics to zero. – University of Maryland rlove@rx.umaryland.edu Research Pain/Pain Management, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Health-Systems, Internal Funding
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD A collection of courses in the graduate school curriculum that include opioid content. – University of Maryland fshaya@rx.umaryland.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Pain/Pain Management, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, PDMP
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD Opioid review for pain management project funded by the Maryland Department of Health Behavioral Health Administration in 2017 to develop criteria that can be used to analyze databases (ex. PDMPs) to identify significant outliers with opioid prescribing or dispensing. – University of Maryland lsimoniw@rx.umaryland.edu Research Opioid Trends, PDMP, Health Departments, Opioid Prescribing, Pain/Pain Management
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD A school of pharmacy faculty member developed a clinic, within the Howard County Health Department, where a pharmacist served as a physician extender to provide buprenorphine maintenance treatment for opioid use disorder patients. – University of Maryland bdipaula@rx.umaryland.edu Practice Health Departments, Buprenorphine, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), CPA, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pharmacists, MAT, Other Health Professionals, Ambulatory Care Practice
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD A opioid overdose response training program, within the Howard County Health Department, taught and supervised by a school of pharmacy faculty, that provides naloxone and rescue breathing certification to bystanders for the community management of opioid overdoses. – University of Maryland bdipaula@rx.umaryland.edu Education Health Departments, Naloxone, Public Outreach, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD A school of pharmacy faculty member serves as a physician extender and provides medication management services including buprenorphine maintenance for opioid use disorder patients. – University of Maryland bdipaula@rx.umaryland.edu Practice Buprenorphine, Non-profit Partner(s), CPA, Other Health Professionals, MAT, Ambulatory Care Practice, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD Launched in 2015, the Maryland Poison Center (MPC) collaborated with the Maryland Department of Health to assist in the development of and implementation of specific reporting for bystander administered naloxone cases. Trained individuals are instructed on how to interact with the individuals in need of naloxone and reporting naloxone use to the MPC. Furthermore, the MPC has developed specific data elements of interest and reports them for each case to state and county health departments on a regular basis. – University of Maryland banderso@rx.umaryland.edu Service Naloxone, Health Departments, Opioid Trends, Harm Reduction
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD A collection of courses, including didactic and laboratories, in the Pharm.D curriculum that include opioid related content. – University of Maryland alardieri@rx.umaryland.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Pain/Pain Management
University of Maryland Public Traditional MD A research elective on prevention programs in the State of Maryland that discuss the prevalence and incidence of prescription drug misuse and consequences. In addition, outreach to public health and other stakeholders, as well as designing and evaluating interventions to address the epidemic were covered in the elective. – University of Maryland fshaya@rx.umaryland.edu Education, Research Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Public Outreach, Substance Use Disorder
University of California, San Francisco Public Traditional CA Opioid stewardship program at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center HIV Clinics. This pharmacist-run program began in 2016 due to the high co-occurrence of substance use, opioid use disorder, and stress levels of the HIV primary care providers around opioid prescriptions. Pharmacists monitor opioid use in the clinic populations, provide guidance around opioid use, and maintain Quality Improvement (QI) data to report to the providers and medical center. The program has become a model for the medical center and the components of the stewardship program are frequently highlighted in medical center-wide opioid meetings. – University of California, San Francisco Jennifer.Cocohoba@ucsf.edu Service, Practice Opioid Stewardship, Ambulatory Care Practice, Pharmacists, Non-profit Partner(s), Substance Use Disorder, Health-Systems, Internal Funding, Other Health Professionals, IPP
Western University of Health Sciences Private Traditional CA Student pharmacist volunteers developed and implemented a program to educate high school students about the dangers of prescription drug abuse. The goal of the program was to increase high schools students' knowledge about prescription drug abuse and its dangers. The programs are delivered by student pharmacists in the classroom during regular class hours. In 2016, over 500 high school students were educated about the dangers of prescription drug abuse, and student pharmacists have continued to educate hundreds of students attending 8 different high schools in our community annually. A survey administered in 2016 indicated that, after the educational program, high school students' knowledge about the dangers of prescription drug abuse improved, students were more likely to identify the correct method for disposing of unused prescription opioids, and students more strongly agreed with statements regarding the seriousness of prescription drug abuse. – Western University of Health Sciences dpon@westernu.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Secondary School Students, Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Public Outreach, Associations/Societies, Non-profit Funding, Non-profit Partner(s),
Western University of Health Sciences Private Traditional CA A one-hour continuing education program was developed for oncology pharmacists on the prescription opioid epidemic. The goal of the program was to increase awareness about prescription opioid epidemic statistics and discuss strategies for the pharmacist to implement as part of good clinical practice. The program was presented in-person and also available via an on-demand webinar. – Western University of Health Sciences dpon@westernu.edu Education Associations/Societies, Continuing Education, Pharmacists, Opioid Trends
Western University of Health Sciences Private Traditional CA A one-hour continuing education program was developed for pharmacists and podiatrists on the prescription opioid epidemic. The goal of the program was to increase awareness about prescription opioid epidemic statistics and discuss strategies for the healthcare provider to implement as part of good clinical practice. – Western University of Health Sciences dpon@westernu.edu Education Continuing Education, Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Opioid Trends
University of Missouri-Kansas City Public Traditional MO The school of pharmacy faculty have been involved in combating the opioid epidemic in their communities through individual efforts and efforts sponsored by student organizations for the prevention of Opioid Use Disorder (OUD). Faculty recognized the growing concern and important role of the pharmacist in these statewide efforts, therefore, the School of Pharmacy formed a committee of faculty known as the Opioid Management Community of Practitioners to discuss the School’s response to the opioid epidemic in Missouri and throughout the nation. The committee involves the School of Pharmacy faculty from all three sites and various clinical practice areas, thereby providing diverse viewpoints to prioritize our response. The committee’s initial work is to address contemporary teaching of our students, educate other health professional students and practicing health care professionals, and contribute to prevention efforts campus-wide, as well as in the community. – University of Missouri-Kansas City lyonsburneyh@umkc.edu Education, Service University Wide Community, Associations/Societies, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pain/Pain Management, Non-profit Partner(s)
Butler University Private Traditional IN In 2016, faculty from three colleges of pharmacy, Butler University, Purdue University, and the California Health Sciences University, completed a national survey exploring drug screening in pharmacy school programs. – Butler University tdevine@butler.edu Research Multiple School Collaboration, Survey Research, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Impaired Health Professionals, Substance Use Disorder
University of Houston Public Traditional TX The college of pharmacy faculty developed and implemented a substance abuse educational event. The program on substance use disorders and their treatment was delivered as a single, four-hour educational event to all the student pharmacists. This unique educational event had information delivered by community members, content area experts, and faculty to give a much-needed set of perspectives to the pharmacy students regarding substance abuse prevention and treatment. The students were divided into groups based on their career pathway of interest. Both groups received the same 90-minute, didactic lecture on the opioid crisis, addiction as a disease, and treatment options for various substance use disorders. – University of Houston jdthornt@central.uh.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Student Pharmacists, Didactic
University of Houston Public Traditional TX The college of pharmacy financially supports a number of student pharmacists to attend the APhA Institute on Alcoholism and Drug Dependencies. Students return to the college of pharmacy to discuss their experiences. – University of Houston ppitman@uh.edu Education Associations/Societies, Student Pharmacists
Howard University Private Traditional DC Based on the goal for the college of pharmacy to be engaged at a higher level with policy solutions in pharmacy and related fields, the college developed an Interdisciplinary Policy Symposium. The symposium, developed in 2016, brings experts from government, the legislature, professional associations, and the community together with students and faculty to create a rich learning experience while contributing to the framework for new policy solutions pertaining to the opioid epidemic. The symposium has reached in excess of 10,000 people because it was live streamed. The model was used to convene stakeholders at other institutions including the Department of Health and trade groups. The NIH who participated in the event has invited key faculty to present at the NIDA conference and have been engaged in activity that is expected to result in grant funding. The expectation is that students will serve as the nation’s best and brightest healthcare professionals and should be duly informed from the field. – Howard University earl.ettienne@howard.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Health Departments, For-profit Funding, Internal Funding, Other Faculty
Howard University Private Traditional DC The college of pharmacy is involved in a collaboration with the college of medicine and the department of computer science to develop a Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) genomic registry. The purpose of the registry is to (1) provide a centralized, web-based database of genomic testing results that can be used by providers who treat substance use disorder (SUD) and aid in optimal, targeted dosing of patients who are receiving MAT, (2) identify possible genetic disorders that may place an individual at risk for opioid use disorder (OUD), (3) offer accurate and validated genomic testing results to patients and providers that provides clinical decision support (CDS) for opioid agonist treatment (OAT), and (4) assist in better health outcomes and quality of life for individuals, families, and communities impacted by OUD. – Howard University earl.ettienne@howard.edu Research Substance Use Disorder, Government Funding, MAT, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Other Faculty, Health Departments, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
Creighton University Private Traditional NE The school of pharmacy delivers opioid education in therapeutics and pharmacy skills lab. This includes the use of naloxone, safe prescribing practices, and pharmacologic alternatives. – Creighton University apick@creighton.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Opioid Prescribing
Creighton University Private Traditional NE The school of pharmacy surveyed school administrators on their perceptions of and need for school-based opioid education. – Creighton University Not provided Research Survey Research, University Wide Community
Manchester University Private Traditional IN The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) for the third-professional year student pharmacists involved the requirement to counsel a patient prescribed opioids for acute pain. The counseling included answering questions that the patient had concerning addiction. – Manchester University tlbrooks@manchester.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management, Didactic, Substance Use Disorder
University of Pittsburgh Public Traditional PA A naloxone administration training program using simulation was developed in 2016. The goals of the program are to educate the public, public health professionals, and community leaders about opioid overdose, how naloxone works, and how to administer intranasal naloxone. – University of Pittsburgh johnsonas@upmc.edu Education Naloxone, Non-profit Partner(s), Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Public Outreach
Roseman University of Health Sciences Private Accelerated NV The student pharmacists established a student organization, the Drug Abuse Awareness Team (DAAT) in 2006. Since that time, they have partnered with the public school district and private schools to provide 30-90 minute interactive presentation within the classroom. The materials presented cover information about the illicit, prescription, and over-the-counter drugs of abuse--with an emphasis on prescription medications. This program was developed due to the concern for the opioid epidemic impacting the community and most specifically a local high school athletic team. Through the years, DAAT has educated thousands of middle and high school students: an estimated 1,000 students have been educated annually since 2006. In 2017, DAAT educated over 1150 students, plus teachers and coaches. The DAAT students are motivated by the goal of providing primary prevention to students in order to help reduce the epidemic facing our communities. An additional goal is that this information will impact secondary prevention efforts to motivate teenagers to choose a healthy lifestyle. – Roseman University of Health Sciences kriccio@roseman.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Secondary School Students, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Law Enforcement, Internal Funding, Non-profit Partner(s)
Roseman University of Health Sciences Private Accelerated NV Student pharmacists, and most recently dental school students, participate in community events that have several goals which include educating the public regarding safe disposal of medications, collecting and safely disposing of unused/expired medications from community members, and distributing safe disposal bags for controlled substances. Student pharmacists, as part of the Drug Abuse Awareness Team (DAAT), volunteer approximately each month to attend health fairs where they educate the public regarding safe drug disposal and distribute safe disposal bags for the destruction of controlled substances. Since 2010, annual to quarterly "drug take back" events have been held in the state where tens of thousands of pounds of medication have been removed from communities. In 2017-2018, nearly 2,000 drug disposal bags were distributed within the local area. – Roseman University of Health Sciences kriccio@roseman.edu Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Drug Disposal, Drug-Take Back, Law Enforcement, For-profit Funding, Public Outreach, Non-profit Partner(s)
Roseman University of Health Sciences Private Accelerated NV The University hosts monthly community health lectures, Neighborhood Health Series, during the academic year. Faculty from the University are invited to provide an hour of education to an audience of community participants. During the 2016-2017 academic year, three of these evening educational sessions were on the topic of substance misuse, understanding addiction, and depression. Roseman University's Neighborhood Health Series is open to the public and has included health care providers, county/state representatives, coalition/organization members, university staff and students. – Roseman University of Health Sciences vmaniago@roseman.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Non-profit Funding, University Wide Community
Roseman University of Health Sciences Private Accelerated NV The university's Research Center on Substance Abuse and Depression is actively working to combat substance misuse and addiction. Current drug discovery efforts are focused on a promising treatment antagonist for psychostimulants. In order to drive drug prevention efforts for individual schools and communities, researchers have been working on establishing a comprehensive mobile/electronic adolescent substance use survey across schools in the state. Researchers worked with the state legislators to draft and present a bill that would have established a mechanism for surveying public school students in the state concerning their substance use. – Roseman University of Health Sciences jtalbot@roseman.edu Research, Advocacy Substance Use Disorder, Secondary School Students, Survey Research, Multiple School Collaboration, Legislation, Non-profit Partner(s), Internal Funding
Virginia Commonwealth University Public Traditional VA The curriculum has a 1-hour lecture on opiates in pharmacology, a 2-hour lecture on opioid abuse, naloxone, and management of opioid use of the disorder, and a laboratory activity on naloxone which includes the REVIVE! program for training lay individuals on the use of naloxone. For the 2017-2018 academic year, the REVIVE! program trained 535 people and 511 naloxone units were distributed. – Virginia Commonwealth University emsisson@vcu.edu; elcrouse@vcu.edu;lamorgan@vcu.edu; kldonohoe@vcu.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Naloxone,
Virginia Commonwealth University Public Traditional VA The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) student chapter participation in a "Train-the-Trainer" program for naloxone conducted by the state department of behavioral health and disabilities services. The student pharmacists who complete the program are able to train lay persons to administer the currently available types of naloxone in an opioid overdose emergency. Over 30 student pharmacists were trained during the 2017-2018 academic year. – Virginia Commonwealth University Not provided Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Health Departments, Associations/Societies, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, State Government, Harm Reduction
Virginia Commonwealth University Public Traditional VA The student pharmacists participated in the Remote Area Medical (RAM) events in rural areas of the state to educate lay persons about opioids and distribute naloxone. – Virginia Commonwealth University emsisson@vcu.edu Service Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Health Departments, Multiple School Collaboration, Public Outreach, Pharmacy Residents, Non-profit Partner(s), Harm Reduction
Virginia Commonwealth University Public Traditional VA A pharmacy faculty member led a discussion on the movie "Oxyana" for a group of interprofessional students on campus. Many student pharmacists also read the book "Dreamland" by Sam Quinones (it was the common reading book for freshman last year) and a pharmacy faculty member led a book discussion for student pharmacists. – Virginia Commonwealth University Not provided Education IPE, University Wide Community, Student Pharmacists
Virginia Commonwealth University Public Traditional VA Curriculum includes an active learning lab that includes examining a patient profile on the prescription drug management program (PDMP), reviewing opioid conversion cases and training on the use of naloxone. – Virginia Commonwealth University KLDonohoe@vcu.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, PDMP, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Health Departments, Naloxone, For-profit Partner(s), Health Departments, State Government, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
Marshall University Public Traditional WV A partnership of all of the health disciplines at the university was formed in 2016 in order to include training on Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) in each of their curricula. – Marshall University warrick2@marshall.edu Education Student Pharmacists, IPE, SBIRT, Government Funding, Didactic, Other Health Profession Students, Federal Government
Marshall University Public Traditional WV Pharmacy faculty based in a health-system provide education on opioids to post-surgery patients being discharged from the health-system. – Marshall University warrick2@marshall.edu Education, Practice Multiple School Collaboration, Non-profit Funding
Keck Graduate Institute Private Traditional CA Pharmacy Academic Detailing on Naloxone for Opioid Safety: California Prescription Drug Overdose Prevention Initiative is a 2-year project that began in September 2016. The faculty have developed a comprehensive academic detailing program to engage and prepare community pharmacists to take a more active role in opioid safety. The goal of this initiative is to increase community pharmacy-based distribution of lifesaving naloxone. Trained detailers assist community pharmacists in understanding the current state of the opioid epidemic, recognizing opioid misuse, identifying those individuals at risk for overdose, educating about medication-assisted treatment (MAT), engaging in opioid overdose education, and expanding access to naloxone. The researchers are collecting data on attitudes and behaviors around opioid stewardship, including naloxone furnishing and will compare data before academic detailing training and after academic detailing training. – Keck Graduate Institute Talia_Puzantian@kgi.edu Education, Research, Service Pharmacists, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, MAT, Health Departments, Government Funding, Community Practice, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Federal Government, State Government, Non-profit Funding, Non-profit Partner(s)
Keck Graduate Institute Private Traditional CA California Pharmacists and the Provision of Naloxone Without a Prescription 2 Years After Legislation Implementation is a research project conducted in January and February 2018. A survey of 20% of California's 6,000 community pharmacies was conducted to estimate the availability of pharmacist-prescribed naloxone two years after state legislation and Board of Pharmacy protocol implementation. The results found that 23.5% of a representative sample of California retail pharmacies were furnishing naloxone to patients without a physician prescription and 50.6% of pharmacies were stocking naloxone. The researchers identified education gaps that can be addressed to increase and improve pharmacy-based naloxone distribution. – Keck Graduate Institute Talia_Puzantian@kgi.edu Research Survey Research, Community Practice, Naloxone, State Government, Pharmacists
Keck Graduate Institute Private Traditional CA Faculty developed a continuing education training program which meets the state Board of Pharmacy requirements for pharmacists to furnish naloxone under protocol. The program is a free webinar which is posted on the board of pharmacy's website. – Keck Graduate Institute Talia_Puzantian@kgi.edu Education Continuing Education, Pharmacists, Naloxone, State Board of Pharmacy, Government Funding, State Government, Health Departments
Keck Graduate Institute Private Traditional CA Curricular implementation of pain management, opioid use disorder treatment, and overdose prevention and treatment modules in the doctor of pharmacy curriculum. In 2016, the curriculum expanded therapeutics modules covering pain management, opioid use disorder, and opioid overdose/naloxone training. All graduates will be trained to meet the state board of pharmacy's requirements to furnish naloxone. – Keck Graduate Institute Talia_Puzantian@kgi.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Naloxone, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
Keck Graduate Institute Private Traditional CA Student pharmacists are surveying all pharmacy schools in the United States regarding naloxone education and training. The purpose of this study is to identify which institutions have incorporated this training into their curriculum and the extent and depth of that training. These student pharmacists will be competing in the annual California Pharmacy Student Leadership (CAPSLEAD) Conference in spring 2019. They will prepare a poster presentation on their survey findings. – Keck Graduate Institute karl_hess@kgi.edu Research Student Pharmacists, Survey Research, Naloxone
The University of Texas at El Paso Public Traditional TX The curriculum contains lectures, course activities and discussion addressing the opioid epidemic in the Principles of Drug Action course, which is taken by student pharmacists during their first professional year. Additional efforts are being made to continue to address this issue at the school of pharmacy, including adding discussion of the opioid epidemic to other related courses and a collaborative workshop on the topic with other academic institution. – The University of Texas at El Paso iamendez2@utep.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
Southwestern Oklahoma State University Public Traditional OK The college of pharmacy is a consortium member with the Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality, Inc. for the HRSA Rural Communities Opioid Response Program - Planning. The College of Pharmacy faculty will be available to provide education on substance abuse disorders, prevention, and treatment. The plan and funding must exclusively benefit targeted rural service areas. Planning for this program will begin fall 2018. – Southwestern Oklahoma State University randy.curry@swosu.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Government Funding, Non-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Funding
University of Cincinnati Public Traditional OH The University of Cincinnati/UC Health Opioid Task Force was formed in 2017 and is co-chaired by Neil MacKinnon, the Dean of the University of Cincinnati Winkle College of Pharmacy. The mission of the task force is to demonstrate its commitment to this significant public health issue by bringing together researchers, educators, clinicians and leaders/advocates who are dedicated to having a positive impact on opioid addiction locally, regionally and nationally. The activities of the task force including aligning expertise and resources to be competitive for research opportunities to continue as a national leader in opioid-related research, formalizing pathways to care across healthcare systems, clinics, programs and agencies, advocating for best practices in evidence-based treatments and prevention, enhancing interprofessional training of healthcare providers and students about innovative approaches to the identification and treatment of chronic pain and opioid addiction, and improving the health of the community through partnerships and engagement. There are four working groups of the task force: Interprofessional Research, Interprofessional Education, Interprofessional Practice, and Community Outreach and Engagement. This task force was commissioned by the leadership of the university and their sister health system (UC Health) in spring 2017. – University of Cincinnati RxDeanMac@uc.edu Service Other Health Professionals, IPE, IPP, Public Outreach, University Wide Community, Pharmacists, Other Faculty, Health-Systems
Wilkes University Private Traditional PA The faculty developed a pain management elective course detailing alternative and ancillary approaches to pain control beyond medication use. The course started in 2014 when several instructors decided that student pharmacists needed exposure to the other factors that go into the understanding and management of chronic pain. The course focuses on communication, physical and emotional therapy, addiction and hospice/palliative care. – Wilkes University Thomas.franko@wilkes.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management
Wilkes University Private Traditional PA The faculty developed an innovative approach to naloxone training where student pharmacists are trained on each device, state law, and how to manage stress during an overdose situation. Student pharmacists then have to complete a live overdose reversal simulation with a real patient and panicked bystander. Our goal is to ensure students were comfortable with each device and could explain to a patient the process for use under stress. This training was compared to the training recommended by the state. Results from two years of data indicate that the school of pharmacy's training results in more accurate and faster completion of the simulation. The average grade for the student pharmacists completing the school's training students was 89% and the average for the state training was 64%. The school of pharmacy group completed the training on average 10 seconds faster than the state training group. This program began in 2016 during the third professional year care laboratory. – Wilkes University Thomas.franko@wilkes.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Internal Funding, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Associations/Societies
Wilkes University Private Traditional PA Wilkes partnered with local agencies to put on the first Pennsylvania Pain and Addiction Summit. This interprofessional, daylong conference brought together various professions that deal with pain and addiction including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, therapists, counselors, lawyers, and first responders in order for each to learn with and from the other on how a team-based approach to care benefits the patient. The event was highlighted by former Mets pitcher Dwight Gooden as the keynote speaker. Nearly 200 people of all professions attended the event. – Wilkes University Thomas.franko@wilkes.edu; Margaret.petty@wilkes.edu Education Associations/Societies, First Responders, Other Health Professionals, Law Enforcement, IPE, Pain/Pain Management, Internal Funding, Substance Use Disorder
Wilkes University Private Traditional PA In 2017, student pharmacists involved in GenerationRx started an Opioid Awareness Walk in downtown Wilkes-Barre. The event was done to raise awareness of addiction as a disease and the impact opioids have on our community. The event, open to the public, raised over $400 which was donated to the Wilkes-Barre fire department to purchase naloxone. The event generated local media attention. – Wilkes University Thomas.franko@wilkes.edu; alex.ponce@wilkes.edu Service Student Pharmacists, Generation RX, Internal Funding, First Responders, Public Outreach
Wilkes University Private Traditional PA The ACE-IT program was an interprofessional activity for students from pharmacy, social work and art therapy from Wilkes University, Misericordia University and Marywood University (all located in the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton area). The intent was for teams of students to see patients affected by addiction, primarily women and children where the spouse was suffering from an addiction. During the course of this program, several families were seen throughout the year by a core group of 21 students. During this time, over 50 doses of naloxone were provided at no charge to families by the student pharmacists. The program began in Fall 2017 and ended in Spring 2018. – Wilkes University Thomas.franko@wilkes.edu Education Multiple School Collaboration, IPE, Substance Use Disorder, Student Pharmacists, Non-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Funding, Naloxone, Other Health Profession Students, Harm Reduction
University of Wyoming Public Traditional WY Each spring, the University of Wyoming College of Health Sciences conducts an Interprofessional Education (IPE) activity focused on opioid use and abuse. The activity involves third professional year student pharmacists, medical students and nursing students working together on case studies in order to achieve the following learning objectives: (1) Identify and describe resources and tools available to healthcare providers when managing patients’ pain; (2) Compare and contrast prescriber and pharmacist roles, responsibilities and concerns related to safe and effective prescription opioid use; (3) Discuss the presence of and implications for implicit (unconscious) bias that health professionals may hold toward patients and the bias patients might have toward healthcare professionals; and (4) Discuss what each profession believes is required to improve patient outcomes while reducing opioid misuse and abuse. The activity also includes a presentation by a physician who works with pregnant women with opioid addiction and how she approaches the care of both the mother and baby, as well as presentations by a person who is in recovery from addiction and a father whose son struggles with opioid addiction. This is a 1.5-hour activity lead by faculty from each of the disciplines involved in IPE. The activity began in April 2016 and was generated through discussions between the Experiential Pharmacy Education Coordinator and the Director of Interprofessional Education for the College of Health Sciences about the need for an IPE activity embedded across existing courses on the topic of opioid abuse. – University of Wyoming abrown13@uwyo.edu Education Student Pharmacists, IPE, Other Health Profession Students, Didactic, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pain/Pain Management
The University of Texas at Tyler Public Traditional TX A faculty member participates in a local substance abuse coalition and is the Chair of the Prescription Drug Task Force on the Coalition. – The University of Texas at Tyler bparmentier@uttyler.edu Service Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Non-profit Partner(s)
The University of Texas at Tyler Public Traditional TX The faculty has collaborated with the Smith County Sheriff's Office to place two permanent prescription drug drop boxes in Tyler, Texas. In the first year, over 1,000 pounds of medication was collected. Future plans include analyzing some of the medications collected by the drop box to determine the percentage of controlled substances, including opioids. – The University of Texas at Tyler bparmentier@uttyler.edu Service Law Enforcement, Drug Disposal, Drug-Take Back, Internal Funding
The University of Texas at Tyler Public Traditional TX The faculty analyzed permanent prescription drug dropbox contents to determine the percentage of controlled medications and opioids collected. This research was generated from a collaboration with the Smith County Sheriff's Office to place two permanent prescription drug drop boxes in Tyler, Texas. Results of this research will be published in the future. – The University of Texas at Tyler bparmentier@uttyler.edu Research Law Enforcement, Drug-Take Back, Drug Disposal, Community-Based Research
The University of Texas at Tyler Public Traditional TX Through the college of pharmacy development council, a collaboration was formed with local professional community leaders to educate physicians about prescribing opioids. A Grand Rounds on the Clinician's Role in the Opioid Epidemic has been organized. A day-long educational seminar for physicians, other healthcare professionals, police, and other stakeholders will be organized in the future. – The University of Texas at Tyler bparmentier@uttyler.edu Education Other Health Professionals, Opioid Prescribing, Health Departments,
The University of Texas at Tyler Public Traditional TX Student pharmacists and faculty participate in the semi-annual DEA Prescription Drug Take-Back Day. The school began collaborating with the local police department upon the founding of the college of pharmacy. – The University of Texas at Tyler bparmentier@uttyler.edu Service Student Pharmacists, Law Enforcement, Drug-Take Back, Federal Government
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Public Traditional IL In Fall 2018 there will be an Interprofessional Education (IPE) event on the opioid crisis to educate health profession students on various aspects of the opioid crisis. Health profession students involved in this event include pharmacy, nursing, paramedic, and respiratory therapy. The objectives of the event are to demonstrate the ability to efficiently care for patients requiring emergent care in an opioid crisis, apply teamwork competencies in a collaborative simulation activity to foster interprofessional team skills necessary to provide patient-centered care, collaborate with interprofessional partners to promote safe medication administration, and reflect on individual and team performance improvement. This is a one-day multi-modal approach with high-fidelity and standardized patient simulations, active learning roundtable sessions, and guest speakers. Topics that are covered include acute opioid overdose, post-operative pain control in a patient with past opioid addiction, substance abuse risk assessment, ethical issues surrounding NICU patient withdrawal, naloxone administration education, and trauma-informed care. Guest speakers include educational and personal experiences from county coroner, law enforcement, EMS, recovering patients, and rehabilitation director. Assessment of the event for this first year will include post-event surveys to gain feedback about the event, post pre-post surveys to assess IPE competencies, and debriefing sessions to assess qualitative information on IPE, event success, and knowledge gained regarding the opioid crisis. In the future, the planning committee would also like to partner with a medical school and other health professions (social work, speech pathology, dental medicine, etc.) to expand the IPE aspect. – Southern Illinois University Edwardsville kronald@siue.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, IPE, Pain/Pain Management, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Multiple School Collaboration, Didactic, Naloxone, Non-profit Partner(s), Health Departments, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Law Enforcement, Health-Systems
Husson University Private Traditional ME The Maine Pharmacist Provider Task Force is composed of leaders and members from multiple Maine healthcare organizations. In addition, front-line clinicians including pharmacists and prescribers in various settings, student pharmacists and residents, and people in long-term recovery are all represented on the task force. The purpose is to improve communication and collaboration between pharmacists and prescribers in Maine, particularly around Chapter 488. The goals of this task force include (1) Facilitate a smooth transition through the final implementation phase of Chapter 488, including the Identification of problems and solutions; (2) Improve communication and collaboration between Maine pharmacists and providers; (3) Foster and improve Maine pharmacist-prescriber relations to optimize and assure provision of holistic, team-based patient care; and (4) Provide networking opportunities to grow connections between pharmacists and providers that could result in interprofessional research, education, or practice opportunities. Chapter 488, had several components, including mandating prescription drug monitoring program (PMP) checks for prescribers and pharmacists on opioid prescriptions and benzodiazepine prescriptions under specific circumstances, restricting the duration and morphine mg equivalent (MME) amount of both new and chronic opioid prescriptions, and mandating electronic prescribing of all opioids. Tangible outcomes from the task force include 1) a report to Maine Quality Counts in March 2018 with recommendations that included promoting pharmacist provider status in Maine; 2) a toolkit aimed at increasing the availability of naloxone in Maine; 3) the opportunity to discuss our work at a USDA Roundtable event; and 4) ongoing interprofessional research and practice collaborations around naloxone. – Husson University nicholss@husson.edu Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Other Health Profession Students, MAT, Naloxone, Opioid Prescribing, Harm Reduction
Husson University Private Traditional ME Maine pharmacists can now access Maine Board of Pharmacy-approved naloxone training through the Maine Pharmacy Association (MPA). A faculty member at the school of pharmacy who was also the President for the MPA championed the effort to increase access to the 2-hour training, which is required for Maine pharmacists who seek to prescribe naloxone under new state legislation effective August 1, 2018. There are currently two options for pharmacists to obtain this training through MPA, both of which are approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education for 2 hours of continuing education. The first option is online via the www.mparx.com website, which costs $10 for MPA members and $25 for non-members. The second option is a live 2-hour training at the MPA Fall Convention on September 22, 2018, in Portland, Maine. This live training will be conducted by a faculty member from the school of pharmacy. – Husson University parsonsc@husson.edu Education Naloxone, Continuing Education, Multiple School Collaboration, Associations/Societies, Pharmacists, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment
Husson University Private Traditional ME Maine Quality Counts (MQC) has included Husson School of Pharmacy faculty on three (and counting) Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) programs aimed at elevating multidisciplinary education and practice around a specific topic related to the opioid epidemic. Topics to date have included: compassionate opioid and benzodiazepine tapering, perinatal opioid use disorders, and medication-assisted therapy for opioid use disorder (OUD). Project ECHO is a movement to de-monopolize knowledge and amplify local capacity that provides best-practice care for underserved people all over the world. The ECHO model is committed to addressing the needs of the most vulnerable populations by equipping communities with the right knowledge, at the right place, at the right time. Fundamental Principals of the Project ECHO model are: 1) Use Technology to leverage scarce resources; 2) Share “best practices” to reduce disparities; 3) Apply case-based learning to master complexity; and 4) Evaluate and monitor outcomes via a web-based database. These project ECHOs began in New Mexico and were brought to Maine by Maine Quality Counts in 2017 and expanded to Northern New England (ME, VT, NH) in 2018. The MQC ECHOs have centered around opioid-related topics in response to the opioid epidemic. – Husson University nicholss@husson.edu Education Government Funding, MAT, Opioid Prescribing, Non-profit Partner(s), Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
Husson University Private Traditional ME Faculty are non-primary authors for publications related to opioid prescribing, overdose, and arrest trends. PMID information: 29551331, 29453006, 29248915, 28543168, 27087386, and 27340958. – Husson University nicholss@husson.edu Research Multiple School Collaboration, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), PDMP, Health-Systems, Opioid Trends, Drug Diversion
Washington State University Public Traditional WA Faculty created a comprehensive elective course that discusses most aspects of pain treatment and responsible opioid prescribing for student pharmacists. The purpose of the elective is to increase student pharmacist knowledge and awareness of appropriate pain management and to recognize inappropriate prescribing, addiction, and diversion. The elective was offered primarily online in spring 2018 and faculty will be adapting it this semester to be available online and self-paced during the 2018-2019 academic year. – Washington State University christina.buchman@wsu.edu Education Drug Diversion, Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Pain/Pain Management, Opioid Prescribing
North Dakota State University Public Traditional ND In 2017, the faculty delivered a 3-hour training to 54 community pharmacists on naloxone prescribing, opioid misuse screening, and counseling of patients receiving opioid prescriptions. From this pilot study, 107 patients were reached with 26% identified as at-risk of opioid use disorder and 30% identified as at-risk of accidental overdose (medication interactions, disease states present, or patient profile). Naloxone was provided to 3 patients and 17 patients were introduced to community support services. This pilot study was published Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy. The success of this pilot project formed the basis for a new project called ONE Rx (Opioid and Naloxone Education), where all pharmacists in the state will be offered the same training, and then deliver a screening for opioid misuse risk using the Opioid Risk Tool for all patients receiving opioid prescriptions. Local resources for referral will also be made available to all community pharmacists in North Dakota. – North Dakota State University mark.strand@ndsu.edu Education, Research, Service Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, Pharmacists, Health Departments, State Board of Pharmacy, Non-profit Funding, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Government Funding, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Associations/Societies, Community Practice, Harm Reduction
North Dakota State University Public Traditional ND The North Dakota State University School of Pharmacy Project ONE Rx: Opioid and Naloxone Education was created in response to the challenge put forth by the New FDA Opioid Analgesic REMS Strategy. More information is available at www.nodakpharmacy.com/onerx. – North Dakota State University Not provided Education, Service Continuing Education, Associations/Societies, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, State Board of Pharmacy, Pharmacists, State Government, Substance Use Disorder, Community Practice, Health Departments, Non-profit Funding, Harm Reduction
St. John Fisher College Private Traditional NY An Interprofessional Education (IPE) event is held with Advanced Practice nursing students, student pharmacists, and mental health counseling students that provides didactic content with an online course through continuing professional education (CPE) and live training with standardized patients on three patient cases. – St. John Fisher College Kplum@sjfc.edu Education Student Pharmacists, IPE, SBIRT, Didactic, Other Health Profession Students, Internal Funding
East Tennessee State University Public Traditional TN The East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Academic Health Sciences Center, which includes the college of pharmacy, has engaged in multiple efforts to combat the opioid epidemic. This work is ongoing and has initiation in the ETSU's Prescription Drug Abuse/Misuse Working Group (PDAMWG). The PDAMWG began in 2012 as a grassroots "callout" by a local pharmacist to do something about the opioid problem. The PDAMWG led to the submission of a NIH R24 proposal that was funded, which has significantly increased university level infrastructure specific to opioid use disorder prevention and treatment. – East Tennessee State University hagemeier@etsu.edu Education, Research, Practice Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Student Pharmacists, Drug Disposal, Drug-Take Back, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Other Health Professionals, Practice-Based Research, IPE, IPP, Government Funding, State Government, Federal Government, Public Outreach, Non-profit Partner(s), Other Faculty, Pharmacists, Abuse Deterrent Opioid Formulation, Harm Reduction
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Public Traditional NJ Pharmacy faculty, in collaboration with DEA 360 and the Milken Institute, participated in a Community Collaboration Workshop held at Horizon Headquarters in Newark, NJ. The workshop was a full day event with over 150 stakeholders. All parties discussed the opioid crisis state of affairs and made concrete commitments towards next steps on behalf of their organizations. – Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey csg@pharmacy.rutgers.edu Education Public Outreach, Non-profit Partner(s), Federal Government, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
University of Toledo Public Traditional OH The University of Toledo is preparing to have all students from 10 health professions (clinical psychology, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, respiratory therapy, social work, speech-pathology) complete naloxone training (train-the-trainer) during their Interprofessional Education course as part of their curriculum. – University of Toledo Michael.Peeters@utoledo.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Didactic, IPE, Naloxone, Other Health Profession Students
The University of Mississippi Public Traditional MS Faculty are engaged in basic research to understand the mechanisms of opioid interactions with HIV proteins to promote neurodegeneration and related comorbidities. Faculty are also engaged in research assessing the efficacy of natural product neurosteroids for their capacity to ameliorate opioid- and/or HIV-related sequelae. – The University of Mississippi parisj@olemiss.edu Research Government Funding, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Multiple School Collaboration
University of Minnesota Public Traditional MN Faculty are engaged in research designed to prevent painkilling medications out of the brain to prevent drug addiction and methods to stop pain impulses before they reach the brain. – University of Minnesota carfair@umn.edu Research Pain/Pain Management, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
Long Island University Private Traditional NY The pharmacy school curriculum includes training third professional year student pharmacists on how to administer Narcan. In addition, Interprofessional Education (IPE) events now include opioid prescribing as a case activity. – Long Island University Fernando.gonzalez@liu.edu; janna.roitman@liu.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Opioid Prescribing, IPE, Didactic, Other Health Profession Students
Loma Linda University Private Traditional CA Since 2013, all third professional year student pharmacists are taught about pain management (with special consideration regarding CDC guidelines and complementary and alternative methods), substance use disorder (with focus on the current opioid epidemic and Medication Assisted Treatment [MAT]), and the furnishing of naloxone. This module of the course consists of approximately 12 direct teaching hours delivered between November and February of the academic year. Teaching consists of both lecture and group learning. – Loma Linda University jkoch@llu.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pain/Pain Management, Naloxone, Guidelines, MAT, Didactic
Loma Linda University Private Traditional CA Loma Linda University has at least two faculty members volunteer their time on the Inland Empire Opioid Crisis Coalition. A pharmacy faculty member joined the coalition in July 2018. This coalition was started in response to the opioid crisis in California and continues to grow in membership. – Loma Linda University jkoch@llu.edu Service Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Health-Systems, Health Departments, Associations/Societies, Public Outreach, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Prescribing
University of Puerto Rico Public Traditional PR Pharmacy school curriculum has a lecture on the appropriate indications, dosing, and safety monitoring of opioids as agents for pain management. The lecture is offered to third professional year student pharmacists as part of the oncology topic in the Pharmacotherapy course. The lecture has been offered for many years, but a discussion on the concept of the opioid epidemic has been addressed since 2016. A distinction is made between the needs of oncology patients and of those patients with other conditions. Currently, the lecture is being further modified and further curricular changes are expected regarding pain management and opioid use. – University of Puerto Rico elsa.pedro@upr.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management, Didactic
University of Puerto Rico Public Traditional PR A partnership between the school of pharmacy and a health insurance plan is in the planning stages. The collaboration will involve providing Medication Therapy Management (MTM) for patients utilizing opioid medications. MTM will be conducted by faculty members and will also involve student pharmacists on clinical Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs). Specific patients who are targeted for MTM will be referred to the school of pharmacy's MTM clinic by the health plan. – University of Puerto Rico frances.rodriguez5@upr.edu Education, Service Student Pharmacists, Experiential, For-profit Partner(s), For-profit Funding, Community Practice
Campbell University Private Traditional NC An Interprofessional substance use disorder course was developed in 2015 and includes fourth professional year student pharmacists, medical students, physician assistant students, nursing students, and social work students on clerkship at Duke University Hospital. Medicine, nursing, and pharmacy school faculty are involved in teaching this interprofessional course. The course occurs monthly with a new cohort of health profession students with approximately 15 students per cohort. – Campbell University Andrew.Muzyk@duke.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Other Health Professionals, Health-Systems, Experiential, Didactic, IPE, Substance Use Disorder, Internal Funding
Xavier University of Louisiana Private Traditional LA All students enrolled in the public health course educate the Xavier University community about substance abuse during National Recovery Month. Students were assigned to groups, developed a brochure, and educated students, faculty, and staff across the campus on various topics, including opioid use. This activity began Spring 2018 and 37 groups of students educated approximately 600 students, faculty, and staff. This activity will occur each September (which is National Recovery Month). – Xavier University of Louisiana llgeorge@xula.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, University Wide Community, Other Health Profession Students
Xavier University of Louisiana Private Traditional LA Pain management, which is part of the pharmacy school core curriculum, is included in the Therapeutics course series. Each year, approximately 150 students receive pain management content in the Therapeutics course series. All students enrolled in the Neurology block are assessed on this topic. – Xavier University of Louisiana rjackso8@xula.edu Education Pain/Pain Management, Didactic, Student Pharmacists
Xavier University of Louisiana Private Traditional LA Substance abuse disorders, which is part of the pharmacy school core curriculum in the Psychiatry block, is included in the Therapeutics course series. – Xavier University of Louisiana tmaestri@xula.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Didactic, Student Pharmacists
Xavier University of Louisiana Private Traditional LA Two college of pharmacy faculty members participated on the Mental Health and Medications panel discussion. This panel provided information to attendees regarding mental health and the focus of this activity was primarily opioid abuse. This information panel was open to the public. – Xavier University of Louisiana llgeorge@xula.edu; tmaestri@xula.edu Education Public Outreach, Other Health Professionals, Student Pharmacists
Midwestern University/Glendale Private Accelerated AZ Several initiatives began at the college of pharmacy in 2017, including a collaborative interprofessional elective which includes a lunchtime presentation to faculty and staff and a chronic pain elective offered twice a year which provides access to CDC and PCSS Opioid Abuse training modules and Arizona Pharmacist Association (AzPA) Naloxone training. In addition, Student Services provides information regarding opioid abuse and makes counseling available. – Midwestern University/Glendale stenna@midwestern.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Other Faculty, Other Health Profession Students, IPE, Pain/Pain Management, Naloxone, Guidelines
University of Saint Joseph Private Accelerated CT The university offers multiple interprofessional trainings of prescribers, health profession students (co-curricular), and patients regarding overdose education and the administration of naloxone. – University of Saint Joseph tmalm@usj.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Other Health Profession Students, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, Multiple School Collaboration, IPE
University of Saint Joseph Private Accelerated CT Pharmacy faculty has provided education programs regarding naloxone to the public and preceptors. An educational program was provided to the public from the Connecticut Advocacy Council in September 2018. Continuing education was provided to preceptors at the Connecticut Society of Health-System Pharmacy's winter continuing education program in January 2017. – University of Saint Joseph tmalm@usj.edu Education Continuing Education, Naloxone, Pharmacists
University of Saint Joseph Private Accelerated CT Faculty are engaged in research regarding opioid prescribing and research regarding reversal agents. This research has been presented at a state pharmacy meeting (Connecticut Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists in November 2016), a regional pharmacy meeting (Society of General Internal Medicine Regional Meeting in March 2017), and several national pharmacy meetings (American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacy Midyear Clinical Meeting in December 2016, Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting in April 2017, and American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacy Midyear Clinical Meeting in December 2017, American College of Clinical Pharmacy in October 2018). – University of Saint Joseph tmalm@usj.edu; dlaskey@usj.edu Research
Wingate University Private Traditional NC A Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) activity is part of the pain pharmacotherapy module during the third professional year for student pharmacists. The activity includes information on the benefits of the PDMP and demonstration on how to use the PDMP. An assessment of student pharmacist knowledge of the PDMP is conducted. The activity was started in the course related to increasing harm reduction strategies in the course and is an addition to pain pharmacotherapy. The activity was added to the pharmacy school curriculum in 2015 and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) research has been published on the activity that shows an increase in student pharmacist knowledge and ability to use the database. – Wingate University g.mospan@wingate.edu Education PDMP, Student Pharmacists, Didactic, Pain/Pain Management
Wingate University Private Traditional NC A community health outreach project to educate the community on harm reduction associated with naloxone was completed by student pharmacists. The project event occurred Fall 2017 at a local event in Hendersonville, North Carolina. – Wingate University m.chaplin@wingate.edu Education Student Pharmacists, Harm Reduction, Naloxone, Public Outreach
Wingate University Private Traditional NC A Pain Pharmacotherapy Module is taught during the third professional year student pharmacist curriculum. This is a one credit hour course and includes all pharmacotherapy as well as Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) for addiction and other various medications. This information is updated each year as medication updates in therapy continuously changes. – Wingate University m.chaplin@wingate.edu Education Pain/Pain Management, Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, MAT
Wingate University Private Traditional NC The Current Issues in Public Health course is a one credit hour course, which includes one lecture related to the opioid epidemic. The lecture discusses current methods utilized to combat the epidemic. The course was added to the pharmacy school curriculum in 2017 to help address the most common public health issues. – Wingate University m.chaplin@wingate.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists
Belmont University Private Traditional TN A naloxone administration training program was implemented at the college of pharmacy. An umbrella student pharmacist organization organized speakers from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy to train student pharmacists and pharmacy faculty. – Belmont University cathy.ficzere@belmont.edu Education Naloxone, University Wide Community, Student Pharmacists, Multiple School Collaboration
South College Private Accelerated GA The school of pharmacy collaborates with local coalitions and law enforcement on drug take-back events. The goal of this collaboration is to educate the public about the dangers of leftover medications and how to dispose of medications. This collaboration has been done quarterly since 2013. – South College moneil@south.edu Service Drug-Take Back, Law Enforcement, Public Outreach,
South College Private Accelerated GA The school of pharmacy provides naloxone training in the community. The goal of the training is to educate healthcare workers and the community-at-large about proper naloxone use. This training has been delivered quarterly since 2016. – South College bwinbigler@south.edu Education, Service Naloxone, Other Health Professionals, Public Outreach, Law Enforcement, Harm Reduction
South College Private Accelerated GA The school of pharmacy has developed a substance use disorder (SUD) website that has information regarding prescription medications. The website was developed in 2013. – South College moneil@south.edu Education Substance Use Disorder, Public Outreach
University of California, San Diego Public Traditional CA The pharmacy school curriculum includes a 2-hour introduction to prescription drug abuse that includes the top 200 medications and a 1-hour naloxone training in the first professional year for student pharmacists. This information is included in the Pharmacy Practice course and is part of the core curriculum. In 2014, pharmacists in California were able to furnish naloxone without a prescription and this course satisfies the education requirement for all students graduating in 2020 and thereafter. – University of California, San Diego npainter@ucsd.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Naloxone, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
University of California, San Diego Public Traditional CA The pharmacy school curriculum includes a 2-hours of content pertaining to the opioid crisis for third professional year student pharmacists. This information is included in the Therapeutics course and is part of the core curriculum. – University of California, San Diego kellylee@ucsd.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
University of California, San Diego Public Traditional CA The pharmacy school curriculum offers a 1-credit elective, Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention, to student pharmacists in the first, second, and third professional years. This elective course started in 2012 as a result of the opioid crises and a gap in the curriculum at the time. Since that time, the faculty has incorporated some of the elective topics into core pharmacy school curriculum and has expanded the elective course. – University of California, San Diego npainter@ucsd.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Law Enforcement, State Board of Pharmacy,
University of California, San Diego Public Traditional CA The pharmacy school curriculum offers a 2-3 unit elective course, Pain and Palliative Care, to third-professional year student pharmacists. This elective was initiated to provide more in-depth understanding of pain management which includes safe and effective analgesia after student pharmacists receive information in the core curriculum. Opioid risk assessment, CDC guidelines and alternatives to opioids are discussed in detail in this elective course. – University of California, San Diego ratayee@ucsd.edu Education Pain/Pain Management, Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Guidelines, Other Health Professionals, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
University of California, San Diego Public Traditional CA Student pharmacists who are members of Generation Rx (via APhA-ASP) provide education to middle school and high school-aged students on prescription drug abuse. This student-initiated activity began in 2010 as one of the APhA-ASP programs. – University of California, San Diego npainter@ucsd.edu Education Generation RX, Student Pharmacists, Secondary School Students, Non-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Funding, Associations/Societies, Public Outreach
University of Findlay Private Traditional OH The college of pharmacy has courses available to student pharmacists who are interested specifically in opioid use/misuse and how to combat the epidemic. The information is covered for all student pharmacists in the neuropsychiatric modules with regards to both mental health and pain management. – University of Findlay burkart@findlay.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Pain/Pain Management
University of Findlay Private Traditional OH The college of pharmacy brings in speakers who are experts in the opioid/opioid abuse field typically once a year and sometimes once a semester. These speaker engagements are available to all faculty, staff, and students within the college of pharmacy. – University of Findlay burkart@findlay.edu Education University Wide Community,
University of Findlay Private Traditional OH The college of pharmacy has several faculty members who serve on the local Opiate Task Force as part of the ADAMHS (Alcohol, Drug, and Mental Health Services) Board. Through this relationship, faculty and student pharmacists participate in community and business medication take-back events in collaboration with local law enforcement to properly dispose of unused medications. The involvement with the ADAMHS Board/Opiate Task Force began early when the college of pharmacy was founded in 2010 and is a partnership between the college of pharmacy, the local Sheriff's Office, and the local Police Department. – University of Findlay burkart@findlay.edu Service Law Enforcement, Student Pharmacists, Drug-Take Back, For-profit Partner(s), Public Outreach
University of Findlay Private Traditional OH There are multiple pharmacy faculty and student pharmacists involved with research and education on the opioid epidemic. Some of the research includes grant-funded research. – University of Findlay burkart@findlay.edu Education, Research
Roosevelt University Private Accelerated IL All students receive the Illinois Opioid Antagonist training and certificate as part of required coursework. Also, Generation Rx education is offered on the undergraduate campus for Opioid Overdose and Naloxone. – Roosevelt University cbrock@roosevelt.edu Education Generation RX, Student Pharmacists, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, Didactic, Associations/Societies, Non-profit Partner(s)
Wayne State University Public Traditional MI Controlled Substance Agreements (CSAs) have been suggested as an element to utilize to reduce the risk of substance abuse misuse. In January 2018, interprofessional Quality Improvement (QI) initiatives were implemented to improve adherence to the clinic's Controlled Substance Agreement (CSA) policy. The clinic pharmacist identified patients meeting policy criteria and educated medical residents, providers, and staff to ensure CSAs were discussed and signed during patient visits. The researchers evaluated the following parameters pre- and post- implementation of the interventions: The percentage of patients on long-term controlled substances (>3 continuous months or recurrent use >6 months) with (a) signed CSA in the electronic medical record, (b) ICD-10 code utilization noting “controlled substance agreement signed” (not required by the policy, but a parameter used to track signed CSAs), and (c) completed urine drug screens (UDS). The researchers also evaluated clinic visits every 3 months since the CSA policy was introduced in April 2017. A total of 127 patients were included in this analysis. Prior to QI initiatives, 12% of eligible patients had a CSA signed, which increased to 83% post-QI (OR 36, 95% CI 18-72, p insaf@wayne.edu Research, Practice Other Health Professionals, Pharmacists, Harm Reduction, Ambulatory Care Practice, Practice-Based Research, IPP, Guidelines
Wayne State University Public Traditional MI Faculty Members from Wayne State University are conducting a research project to examine high risk opioid prescribing as defined by opioid dosage, duration or concurrent use with other medications longitudinally and across geographic areas to assist the need for specific interventions and the impact of national, state and payer polices to address the opioid overdose epidemic in Southeastern Michigan. Characteristics of patients who received an opioid or an opioid and other high risk controlled prescription(s) and the respective prescribers over a 5-year time period were reviewed from a prescription claims database from an independent pharmacy chain. Preliminary results will be available in fall 2018. – Wayne State University vtlehr@med.wayne.edu Research For-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Funding, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Community-Based Research, Opioid Trends
Wayne State University Public Traditional MI In September of 2018, Wayne State University held an Information Fair and Panel Discussion for Opioid Awareness Day. This daylong activity was planned since January 2018 by the WSU Opioid Task Force. Student pharmacists, as part of Generation Rx, and medical students staffed information tables on main campus to provide information on safe opioid use, appropriate opioid disposal, naloxone, and high risk medication combinations. Faculty members and a community advocate presented in a panel discussion on Naloxone Access, Addiction and Recovery, Regulations and the Opioid crisis, and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome. – Wayne State University vtlehr@med.wayne.edu Education Internal Funding, Non-profit Partner(s), Other Health Profession Students, IPE, University Wide Community, Student Pharmacists, Generation RX, Drug Disposal, Naloxone, Substance Use Disorder
Wayne State University Public Traditional MI "Starting the conversation" is a teaching activity within the acute/chronic pain section of the Neuropsychiatry pharmacotherapy module during the second/third professional year of the Doctor of Pharmacy program. The class instructor and Anesthesia physician "role-played" examples of cases of high-risk prescribing where the pharmacist had to contact the physician. Four cases illustrating different cases of acute and chronic pain with varying risks secondary to opioids and other controlled medications were presented. Student pharmaicsts were invited to participate with the physician and engage in discussion. – Wayne State University vtlehr@med.wayne.edu Education Other Health Professionals, Pain/Pain Management, Student Pharmacists
Appalachian College of Pharmacy Private Traditional VA In July 2016, Appalachian College of Pharmacy partnered with Virginia's Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to dispense Naloxone and provide training at RAM events in Wise and Grundy, VA. – Appalachian College of Pharmacy rnicholas@acp.edu Education, Service State Government, Naloxone, Public Outreach
University of Illinois at Chicago Public Traditional IL A taskforce of faculty from the Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy convened in Fall 2017 to begin to plan the Opioid Summit and get buy-in from community leaders. The UIC College of Pharmacy in Rockford hosted an Opioid Summit in April 2018 to address ways to reduce inappropriate opioid prescribing in Rockford, IL and surrounding communities. The summit, attended by 180 physicians, nurses and pharmacists, focused on what health care providers can do to reduce the prescription of opioids. Outcomes from the Summit included planning for a follow-up summit in 2019 to address managing opioid use in special populations, the College of Pharmacy in Rockford planning to participate as a site for a future Drug Take Back Day, and an initiative by students and faculty to provide educational posters in all prescriber offices in Rockford. – University of Illinois at Chicago krynn@uic.edu Education, Service Opioid Stewardship, Public Outreach, Student Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Drug-Take Back, Non-profit Partner(s), Other Health Profession Students
Medical College of Wisconsin Private Accelerated WI The Urban Community Health Scholarly Pathway Program offers multiple current topics in public health. One of the core sessions for this program is Opioid/Heroid Addition. The learning objectives for this session are to (1) Describe factors contributing to recent escalations in opiate addiction and heroin overdose; (2) Discuss how stigma and stereotypes affect our approach to the opioid epidemic in our community: (3) Explore interventions we might employ to prevent deaths from heroin overdose as clinicians and as public health advocates; and (4) Demonstrate and teach appropriate use and administration of naloxone. The topics covered during this session include (1) Faces of Addiction: Stereotypes and Stigma; (2) Introduction to Opiate Addiction: How did we get here?; (3) Heroin Addiction: Part 1 and 2; (4) Initiatives and Perspectives on Addressing Opiate Overdose; and (5) Naloxone Policy and Administration Exercise. – Medical College of Wisconsin nlamberton@mcw.edu Education Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Naloxone, Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Other Faculty, Other Health Profession Students
Medical College of Wisconsin Private Accelerated WI The purpose of the Opioid/Heroin Overdose Prevention Academic Workgroup is to gather academics, researchers, and policy makers from the Milwaukee community to discuss current opioid-related research projects and opportunities for collaboration or leveraging resources. The workgroup typically meets on a quarterly basis. – Medical College of Wisconsin nfumo@mcw.edu Service Pharmacists, Public Outreach, Other Health Professionals, Other Faculty
Medical College of Wisconsin Private Accelerated WI Milwaukee PROMPT (Prevention of Opioid Misuse through Peer Training) is working to address opioid misuse among veterans with a community partner which provides peer mentoring services to veterans returning from combat and has witnessed the rise in opioid addiction. It focuses on prevention of opioid use disoder (OUD) in a subset of the Milwaukee veteran population by seeking to change their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to opioid use through a peer-delivered curriculum. Using community engagement (CE) strategies, it aims to develop and implement a trauma-informed, peer mentoring approach to OUD prevention. Mental Health America Wisconsin (MHA) will support the peer mentors working with veterans by providing supervision, consultation, training, and program and curriculum development. The team collected focus group data from local peer support providers, veterans with history of opioid use disorder, and family members/friends who have supported a loved one with OUD to determinethe topics and skills to emphasize in the crafting of the OUD prevention training modules for peer support providers. Upon review of the focus group data, the project team engaged in a series of meetings to further deliberate with veterans and additional clinician stakeholders. After an iterative process, the group determined that five module topics will be developed for additional peer mentor training: (1) The Impact of Trauma and How it Influences Substance Abuse; (2) Trauma Informed Care Approaches in Peer Mentoring; (3) The Art of Influencing Others; (4) The Science of Pain & Pain Medication; and (5) Self-Care & Wellness Strategies The target date for completion of module conten was November 2018, and the OUD prevention module training is slated to take place starting mid-December 2018 through mid-March 2019. – Medical College of Wisconsin sahmed@mcw.edu Service Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Public Outreach, Non-profit Partner(s), Non-profit Funding, IPP, Pain/Pain Management
Medical College of Wisconsin Private Accelerated WI Milwaukee Community Opioid Prevention Effort (Milwaukee COPE) mission is to investigate and provide information on the complexities of the opioid and heroin problem. By promoting evidence-based approaches to local policymakers, researchers and clinical care providers, they hope to reduce the number of opioid-related overdose deaths. By utilizing all of these outlets, the goal of this project is to advance our understanding of the scope and nature of this problem utilizing public health sciences and data acquisition to drive targeted prevention efforts that will have a measurable impact in our community. For a more comprehensive analysis of Milwaukee County Opioid data and to access maps and graphs of local data please visit the Milwaukee COPE website's data page. – Medical College of Wisconsin nfumo@mcw.edu Research Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Public Outreach, Government Funding, Internal Funding, Non-profit Funding, Legislation, Continuing Education, Opioid Trends
Northeast Ohio Medical University Public Traditional OH The college of pharmacy student pharmacists receive 4 hours in therapeutics on substance use disorder and 1.5 hours focused on opioids within the therapeutics curriculum. – Northeast Ohio Medical University Cpaxos@neomed.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Harm Reduction
The University of Kansas Public Traditional KS In the Fall of 2018, a skills lab for third-professional year student pharmacists began. This skills lab addresses many aspects of the opioid overdose crisis: Reviewing prescriptions, PDMP and deciding how to respond, naloxone counseling/distribution, calculating morphine equivalents, and interpreting urine drug testing. – The University of Kansas kmoeller@kumc.edu Education PDMP, Student Pharmacists, Pain/Pain Management, Opioid Prescribing, Naloxone
The University of Kansas Public Traditional KS The school of pharmacy offers lecture base instruction on opioid epidemic in pharmacotherapy with a recitation section on how to start buprenophine therapy in a patient with addictions. Naloxone is also reviewed. – The University of Kansas kmoeller@kumc.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Buprenorphine, Naloxone, Substance Use Disorder Treatment
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Public Traditional NY The School of Pharmacy participated in the Pharm4Me Innovation Challenge: a national competition where high school students and pharmacy students collaborate to identify medication or health-related problems in their communities and explore innovative solutions to solve those problems. The team created an initiative entitled OpiEducate, a multifaceted program designed to help pharmacy students provide opioid education to high school students and enhance the role of the pharmacist in the community. The OpiEducate website serves as a resource for students across the country and includes PSAs, downloadable posters and brochures, and educational quizzes. Facebook and Instagram pages further enhance the initiative’s digital presence. OpiEducate also provides guidelines for health fairs, which the team tested out and refined at Sacred Heart Academy, where over 50 STEM students attended. – University at Buffalo, The State University of New York jmr16@buffalo.edu; rgwahler@buffalo.edu Education, Service Secondary School Students, Student Pharmacists, Public Outreach, Associations/Societies
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Public Traditional NY The purpose of the New York State (NYS) Prescription Drug Overdose (PDO) Prevention Program is to advance and evaluate comprehensive state-level interventions for preventing prescription drug overuse, misuse, abuse, and overdose. Effective July 22, 2016, Public Health Law Article 33 §3309-a was updated to require prescribers with a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) number and medical residents prescribing under a facility DEA number to complete a minimum of three (3) hours of course work or training in pain management, palliative care and addiction (M.D., DDS, NP, PA, DPM). Mandated programming included: NYS and federal requirements for prescribing controlled substances; pain management; appropriate prescribing; managing acute pain; palliative medicine; prevention, screening and signs of addiction; responses to abuse and addiction; and end of life care. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain-United States, 2016 was also included in the training. Training was required to be completed by June 30, 2017. An interdisciplinary team from the University at Buffalo was formed to develop a 4-hour accredited (ACMME, ACPE, ADA CERP ) enduring training program which launched March 15, 2017. A pre and post-test was included, with 70% required for successful completion of the two modules of the course As of June 13,2017 a total of 28,034 prescribers have completed this training, with the majority (87.92%) from NYS. – University at Buffalo, The State University of New York eb@buffalo.edu Education, Research, Advocacy Substance Use Disorder, Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Legislation, Pain/Pain Management, Law Enforcement, Other Health Professionals, Guidelines, Government Funding, IPE, Published Article (Peer-Reviewed)
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Public Traditional NY The School of Pharmacy implemented an opioid safety program that incorporates advanced opioid patient counseling with checklist training, naloxone administration and dispensing training and Prescription Drug Monitoring Program orientation. The Opioid Safety project scope of work includes the implementation of standardized opioid pharmacist-patient counseling in combination with direct patient and prescriber level interventions to decrease the risk of opioid-related adverse events in community pharmacies (the “intervention”). The University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (UB) will create the intervention and pharmacist education on the intervention. – University at Buffalo, The State University of New York eb@buffalo.edu; rgwahler@buffalo.edu Education, Research, Service Naloxone, Harm Reduction, PDMP, Pharmacists, Government Funding, Non-profit Partner(s), Law Enforcement, State Government, For-Profit Partner(s)
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Public Traditional NY The School of Pharmacy has developed a continuing education program that will provide the training needed for pharmacists to comply with the standing orders for dispensing naloxone issued by Harm Reduction Coalition and those issued by the Erie County Department of Health. – University at Buffalo, The State University of New York mmnelson@buffalo.edu Education, Service Naloxone, Harm Reduction, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Pharmacists, Community Practice, Continuing Education
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Public Traditional NY The School of Pharmacy added an advanced opioid specific counseling exercise to the curriculum for third-professional year student pharmacists and naloxone counseling and demonstrations for first-professional year student pharmacists. – University at Buffalo, The State University of New York rgwahler@buffalo.edu Education Didactic, Student Pharmacists, Naloxone
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Public Traditional NY The School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (SPPS) and pharmaceutical company will partner to distribute 20,000 Deterra Drug Deactivation Systems to the Western New York community. These biodegradable pouches will help prevent prescription drug abuse by dissolving unused medication – University at Buffalo, The State University of New York kdf@buffalo.edu Service Public Outreach, For-Profit Partner(s), Drug Disposal
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Public Traditional NY The School of Pharmacy hosted an Interprofessional Education Program on the Opioid epidemic. Sponsored by the UB Office of Interprofessional Education, “Confronting Opioid Dependence: An Interprofessional Strategy” gave UB’s health professions students in 10 different programs of study an opportunity to work together on an urgent public health problem. – University at Buffalo, The State University of New York nmfusco@buffalo.edu Education IPE, Other Health Profession Students, Other Health Professionals, Student Pharmacists, Substance Use Disorder
University of Illinois at Chicago Public Traditional IL In August of 2016, the Illinois Departmetn of Human Services (DHS) and Illinois Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) engaged research faculty in the Department of Pharmacy Systems, Outcomes and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy to evaluate the impact of activities started as part of funding received through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Prescription Drug Overdose: Prevention for States program. These activities include 1) enhancing and maximizing prescription drug monitoring program use by moving towards universal PMP registration, increased ease of use and access of the PMP, real-time PMP reporting, and making local level statistical data available for surveillance and public dissemination and 2) implementing community or health system interventions by identifying and providing technical assistance to community service entities and evaluating prescriber and dispenser activities in high-burden areas. – University of Illinois at Chicago kmoeller@kumc.edu Research Health Departments, PDMP, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Government Funding, State Government, Health-Systems, Opioid Prescribing
University of Illinois at Chicago Public Traditional IL The University of Illinois at Chicago implemented an academic detailing intervention through partnerships developed with leaders at health-systems in the Chicagoland and southern Illinois regions during 2018 and is currently ongoing. This study aims to evaluate the impact of academic detailing, a method of educatioanl outreach to provide clinicians with current evidence-based information through individual, face-to-face vists by specially trained personnel. The intervention was delivered by academic detailers to providers with prescriptive authority and specialized in primary care and consisted of two one-on-one visits with providers and an academic detailer. The second visit occurred approximately six to eight weeks after the initial visit. Both visits were expected to last about 15 minutes in duration. The visits included the following components: 1) key messages from the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain; 2) provider-specific information on past opioid prescribing from the Illinois PMP; 3) and an assessment of provider satisfaction with academic detailing visits. In addition, measures were developed to evaluate provider satisfaction with academic detailing visits and the academic detailer’s perception of academic detailing visit effectiveness to evaluate the academic detailing program effectiveness as well as assist in continuous quality improvement of the academic detailing visits. – University of Illinois at Chicago pickard1@uic.edu Education, Research Health Departments, PDMP, State Government, Opioid Overdose/Risk Assessment, Government Funding, Health-Systems, Guidelines, Pharmacists, Other Health Professionals, Pain/Pain Management, Opioid Prescribing, For-profit Partner(s), Published Article (Peer-Reviewed), Community-Based Research, Continuing Education