Pharmacy Education 2018 Programming

Boston Harbor Skyline

Pre-Sessions

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program

Fee: $350 ($75 with a full conference registration). Pre-registration recommended; registration includes lunch and Sunday morning’s sessions.

Sunday, July 22

10:00 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Catalyzing Workplace Diversity Through Equity and Inclusion

Sheraton: Riverway, Fifth Floor

This session will explore the impact of unconscious bias on diversity, equity and inclusion efforts within colleges of pharmacy. This interactive session is designed for staff and managers to define unconscious bias, become more aware of individual biases and perceptual filters, explore the impact of bias in the workplace and to discuss strategies for addressing bias within the colleges. Participants will engage in a safe activity to discover their unconscious biases and explore their origins and impact.

(Speaker) John V. Armendariz, Northeastern University

11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Lunch and Panel Discussion: Building Relationships With IT and Addressing Information Security Requirements

Sheraton: Riverway, Fifth Floor

Designed to engage participants in collectively sharing information, ideas, and concerns related to recent IT regulations affecting health science colleges. Our panel of experts will cover topics such as IT audit findings, HIPAA compliance, IT risk assessments, and maintaining IT infrastructure. This session will include an open-dialogue with the AFO-SIG participants.

(Speaker) Anthony E. Airhart, University of Colorado

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Panel Discussion: Breaking Down the "NO" Mentality

Sheraton: Riverway, Fifth Floor

Explore realms of relationship building across your college. Learn how to break down preconceptions such as: Administrative and Finance Officers always saying “NO.” This fun and interactive panel will consist of department heads, development officers, student affairs personnel and faculty.

(Speaker) Khaled A. Elsaid, Chapman University; (Speaker) Cherelyn Espina, University of Washington; (Speaker) Kevin O. Rynn, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Kelly Sylvester, Washington State University; (Speaker) Marcia M. Worley, The Ohio State University

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Rapid Fire/Business Items

Sheraton: Riverway, Fifth Floor

Moderated group discussion of current hot topics, as well as future meeting programming areas. Current topics (tuition, state or budget fiscal climate, changeover in college leadership, etc.) SIG business items and Interim Meeting topics.

(Chair) Chelsea "Beth" Walker, The University of New Mexico

Admissions Workshop

Fee: $350. Pre-registration is recommended, space is limited. Registration includes morning coffee, two lunches, and beverage breaks.

Friday, July 20

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Registration Desk

Hynes Convention Center: Room 304, Third Level

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

PharmCAS Cycle Updates, Policy Review, and Future Plans

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

AACP and PharmCAS staff will share preliminary cycle data, an overview of PharmCAS policies and updates for the 2018–2019 application cycle and beyond.

(Speaker) Melissa Keaveney, Liaison International; (Speaker) Mike Margitich, Liaison International; (Speaker) Katie C. Owings Bruce, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Libby J. Ross, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

9:30 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Beverage Break

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

9:45 a.m.–Noon

WebAdMIT Best Practices

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Advanced

Group discussions on best practices in WebAdMIT will be facilitated by members of the PharmCAS Advisory Committee. Discussions will cover an array of topics including tracking course prerequisite completion, nurturing applicants in WebAdMIT, custom fields, requirements, and reports and exports.

(Speakers) Members of the PharmCAS Advisory Committee;

9:45 a.m.–Noon

WebAdMIT Training for New Users

Hynes Convention Center: Room 305, Third Level

Introductory

First-time and beginner PharmCAS/PharmGrad/PharmDirect users and any admissions teams who do not use WebAdMIT for admission processing, this session is for you! This session will cover the basics of how to access applicant information, how to set admissions decisions, and how to utilize the configuration portal. Basic applicant processing techniques will also be covered.

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Clutter, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Katie C. Owings Bruce, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Lunch

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Private lunch for Admissions Workshop participants only.

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Making the Case for Holistic Admissions: Perspectives From Dentistry (ADEA), Medicine (AAMC), and Nursing (AACN)

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Holistic admissions refers to a process of considering the capabilities and attributes of applicants beyond grade point averages and standardized test scores to better assess their readiness to engage in graduate or professional education. This session is designed to describe the value of a holistic admissions and promote the adoption of the concept, practice and utilization of a holistic admissions review framework. Germane to this process is a review of the considerations related to institutional willingness to consider alternate admissions processes, the legal foundation for diversity considerations in admissions, impact of unconscious bias, race-neutral alternatives and activities designed to facilitate program adoption of holistic admissions review. Representatives from the American Dental Education Association (ADEA), Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), and American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) will share their association’s experience in facilitating holistic admissions with their respective member institutions.

(Moderator) Rosie Walker, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Carolyn Booker, American Dental Education Association; (Speaker) Sarah S. Conrad, Association of American of Medical Colleges; (Speaker) Vernell DeWitty, American Association of Colleges of Nursing

2:30 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Beverage Break

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

2:45 p.m.–3:35 p.m.

Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI): Point/Counterpoint

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

The Multiple Mini Interview has been used for several years in health sciences schools’ admissions processes. It is intended to measure non-academic constructs and typically consists of six to ten short interviews focusing on a scenario and lasting five to ten minutes each. The session presenters will outline the pros and cons of MMIs, the available evidence around their use, and whether they should be adopted by all colleges and schools of pharmacy to better inform admission decisions and predict student success.

(Speaker) Wendy C. Cox, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Seth D. Heldenbrand, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

3:40 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Student-Focused Transition From Admissions to Academic and Student Affairs

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Ensuring a successful transition from applicant to enrolled student is a critical component of both the admission and onboarding process into a new pharmacy program. Often times, the onboarding process is overlooked as a strategy for continuous recruitment and retention, is hindered by lack of technology, lack of resources or a gap between admission and student and academic affairs units. Creighton University has spent years growing both technological and collaborative efforts and have identified several useful strategies to successfully engage incoming students.

(Speaker) Shawn M. Cook, Creighton University; (Speaker) Mackenzie Stick, Creighton University

4:30 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Cooperative Admissions Guidelines Update and Open Forum

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

The session will provide an update on the Cooperative Admissions Guidelines (CAG) during the 2017–2018 admissions cycle and related survey results. Speakers will share their institutional perspectives and the latest on environmental factors that may impact the CAG in the future. Attendees will have an opportunity to share their experiences and provide feedback on the CAG.

(Speaker) Jordana S. Berry, Mercer University; (Speaker) Thomas TenHoeve III, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Andrea L. Wall, University of Cincinnati

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

PharmCAS Advisory Committee Meeting

Hilton Boston Back Bay: Maverick A, Second Floor

Closed Meeting

(Chair) Jonathan M. Parker, Samford University

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

PharmGrad Advisory Committee Meeting

Hilton Boston Back Bay: Copley, Second Floor

Closed Meeting

(Chair) Kimberly J. Dunn, Campbell University

7:30 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

PharmCAS & PharmGrad Advisory Committee Dinner

Hilton Boston Back Bay: Fenway, First Floor

Closed Meeting

Saturday, July 21

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

PCAT Update

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Members of the PCAT Advisory Committee will discuss ongoing changes to the PCAT, describe the development of test items and review recent test results including a discussion of potential implications.

(Speaker) Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, University of Missouri—Kansas City; (Speaker) Renee M. DeHart, Samford University; (Speaker) Mary L. Euler, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University

9:30 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Beverage Break

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

9:45 a.m.–Noon

Leveraging National Campaigns and Champions in Pharmacy School Recruitment

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

This session will feature updates on the status of the AACP recruitment and branding campaigns, innovation challenge, opportunities for schools to tap into resources, pharmacy champion speakers, videos, what’s ahead, etc.

(Speaker) Jeffrey A. Bates, Cedarville University; (Speaker) Chelsea W. Bennett, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Joanna DiGloria, Youth Marketing Connection;(Speaker) David F. Gregory, Belmont University; (Speaker) Lisa Rothwell, Youth Marketing Connection; (Speaker) Libby J. Ross, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Rosie Walker, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Lunch

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Private lunch for Admissions Workshop participants only.

1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Pharmacy Camps

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

This session will describe the process of designing and promoting a successful pharmacy camp and enrichment program for middle, secondary and college-aged students.

(Speaker) Lakesha M. Butler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Christine L. Cadiz, Keck Graduate Institute; (Speaker) Philip M. Hritcko, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Mark S. Luer, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

2:00 p.m.–2:50 p.m.

Minority Student Recruitment

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Presenters will share innovative strategies to promote pharmacy education and careers to students from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups and disadvantaged backgrounds.

(Moderator) Rosie Walker, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Angela Finerson, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Toyin S. Tofade, Howard University (Speaker) Jennifer S. Williams, The University of Tennessee

2:50 p.m.–3:10 p.m.

Beverage Break

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

3:10 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Feeding Your Pipeline the Right Fuel for the Right Students: A Story of Three Early Assurance Programs

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

How can your school address the challenges of a declining national, regional and local applicant pool? Three schools will share perspectives on how their Early Assurance Programs have impacted the admissions pipeline. Admissions and matriculation requirements will be discussed, and retention and early assessment data will be shared. A discussion of the successes and challenges of these programs and their potential for addressing a declining applicant pool will be shared through an open Q&A format following three mini-presentations in this valuable session.

(Speaker) Lawrence M. Brown, Chapman University; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Clutter, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Amy Diepenbrock, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Candace M. Gonzalez, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Mary L. Euler, West Virginia University

4:10 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Achieving Diversity Goals: Use of Parental Education and Occupation as an Indicator of Socioeconomic Status

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Would you like more standardized information when evaluating diversity characteristics during the admission process? Join us, as researchers share their analyses of PharmCAS data, and describe a tool developed for measuring socioeconomic status (SES) of PharmCAS applicants. This tool has potential for use in evaluating SES as a diversity characteristic in admission processes.

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Adams, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Rahul Nohria, West Coast University

Joseph T. DiPiro Excellence in Publishing Workshop: Editorial Pearls and Insights Into Successful Academic Publishing in AJPE

Fee: $75. Pre-registration recommended, limited space available.

Saturday, July 21

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Sheraton: Hampton, Third Floor

Introductory

Writing and reviewing manuscripts for educational journals are essential skills for a pharmacy educator. Participants will learn useful guidance (pearls) and hands-on experience in the manuscript preparation and review process by the AJPE editorial team based on their experiences with authors and reviewers. During the small group exercises, participants will have the chance to discuss their manuscript with AJPE editors.

(Speaker) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University; (Speaker) Nancy Fjortoft, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Lauren S. Schlesselman, University of Connecticut

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the elements of a successfully submitted manuscript to AJPE.
  2. Familiarize themselves with the fundamentals of AJPE style.
  3. Review the elements of an outstanding peer review for AJPE.
  4. Discuss their manuscript with the AJPE editorial team.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-041-L04-P, 3.00 Contact Hours)

Early Career Faculty Program: Preparing a Successful Grant Proposal

Fee: $75. Pre-registration recommended, limited space available.

Saturday, July 21

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Sheraton: Riverway, Fifth Floor

Introductory

A winning grant proposal begins with planning. In this workshop, researchers and program officers will share tools and insights to heighten the impact of your proposals. Learn how to identify funding sources, survey the landscape of funded research, set an objective that resonates with funders and develop a compelling research plan. Participants are encouraged to come prepared to present their ideas and discuss proposals they’re developing.

(Moderator) Dorothy F. Farrell, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Rajender Aparasu, University of Houston; (Speaker) Grace Kuo, University of California, San Diego

Navigating Toward Major Gifts: A Development Program for Deans and Development Officers

Fee: $395. Pre-registration recommended; includes beverage break and lunch.

 

Sponsored by Pocket Nurse

Pocket Nurse logo

 

Saturday, July 21

8:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Sheraton: Gardner, Third Floor

Intended Audience: Development Directors Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section

Higher education is one of the larger beneficiaries of charitable dollars, and the greatest beneficiary of seven, eight and even nine figure gifts. Today’s deans shoulder responsibility for fundraising that in the past only a president might have assumed. To be successful, it is important to understand the sector and the competitive nature of philanthropy.

CCS is a strategic fundraising firm that partners with nonprofits for transformational change. They plan, manage, and implement programs that achieve fundraising goals and mission impact. This includes exceeding billion dollar goals for university campaigns as recently as 2017. The session is designed for deans, development personnel and other leaders interested in cultivating support for your programs and institutions. The session will conclude with a panel presentation with successful case studies in pharmacy college philanthropic activities.

(Speaker) Brian Nevins, CCS Principal and Managing Director

10:00 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Beverage Break

Sheraton: Gardner, Third Floor

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Lunch

Sheraton: Gardner, Third Floor

Private lunch for Development Program participants only.

Teachers Seminar: Personalized Learning: Striving for Greater Self-Awareness and Adaptability

Fee: Member $225; Non-member $325; Student: $125. Pre-registration recommended; includes breakfast, beverage breaks and lunch.

Saturday, July 21

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Breakfast

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom C, Third Level

Curriculum Special Interest Group

Private breakfast for Teachers Seminar participants only.

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

Keynote: Personalized Learning for All: Oxymoron, Groundhog Day, or Opportunity?

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom B, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group

The goals of providing learning environments and opportunities to facilitate individual student success are not new in education. Over the past several decades, pharmacy educators have discussed the importance of preparing students for the realities of contemporary practice, the need to change the educational paradigm from one that is teacher-centered to one that is student-centered, and strategies to assess student development of competencies deemed foundational to pharmacy practice across a variety of professional roles and settings. The contemporary personalized learning movement builds on elements of each of these and leverages technology and other tools to scale personalization to accommodate student diversity, optimize individual strengths and preferences, and foster varied professional interests.

(Moderator) Stuart T. Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Susan M. Meyer, University of Pittsburgh

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Examine the concept of personalized learning in relation to student-centered learning and competency-based education.
  2. Describe current applications of personalized learning in higher education.
  3. Analyze the advantages and challenges associated with personalized learning in contemporary pharmacy education.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-032-L04-P, 0.75 Contact Hour)

8:55 a.m.–9:25 a.m.

Grit, Resilience, Motivation, and Mindset: What Are We Talking About, Why Should We Care, and Can We Cultivate It?

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom B, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

Grit as a concept has become wildly popular recently and with this popularity has come both proponents and detractors of the psychological measurement itself, but are there practical applications of grit that pharmacy educators can use? In this short session, attendees are invited to explore the invisible “it” factor, discuss underlying psychological theory behind motivation and grit, and develop concrete ways to move this concept from theory to practice both in themselves and their students.

(Speaker) Adam Pate, The University of Mississippi

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the psychological construct of motivation and its relation to grit, resilience, mindset, etc.
  2. Explain ways to cultivate and develop motivation.
  3. Develop an implementation plan for applying concepts to personal experience.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-033-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

8:55 a.m.–9:25 a.m.

Utilizing a Strengths-Based Approach in Personalized Instruction

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom A, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

Learners will explore how the results of and philosophy behind Gallup’s StrengthsFinder® tool can be utilized in the development, implementation and evaluation of personalized instruction. In the process, participants will learn more about the strengths movement, identify the flexibility to personalize learning toward a learner’s strengths, and assess the learning experiences while considering their own strengths and the strengths discovery of their learners.

(Speaker) Andrew P. Traynor, Concordia University Wisconsin

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify concepts of the strengths movement that are applicable to personalized learning.
  2. Outline learning activities in one’s learning environment(s) that have the flexibility to personalize learning with a strengths focus.
  3. Implement actions to personalize learning with a strengths focus based on the assessment of the teacher and learner baseline strengths.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-034-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

9:35 a.m.–10:05 a.m.

Enhancing Teaching and Learning With Adaptive Courseware

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom B, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

In this session, faculty will learn how adaptive courseware and adaptive learning teaching strategies can help them manage large classes, personalize learning for students, and track student outcomes across the curriculum in the same digital platform. The presenter will share student feedback data on their experience of adaptive courseware as well as strategies and outcomes based on case studies from The University of Mississippi.

(Speaker) Patricia O'Sullivan, The University of Mississippi

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Articulate three key measures of adaptivity in digital learning platforms.
  2. Summarize the benefits of adaptive courseware and adaptive learning teaching strategies to teaching and learning.
  3. Locate tools for comparing and choosing adaptive courseware.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-035-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

9:35 a.m.–10:05 a.m.

Using Learning Styles Theory to Improve Your Teaching

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom A, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

Learning styles theory provides educators with a unique perspective into what motivates learners to truly learn. This session will focus on practical methods for applying learning styles theory to the design and delivery of educational programs in diverse classroom and clinical settings, to enhance the quality of the learning (and teaching) experience.

(Speaker) Zubin H. Austin, University of Toronto

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss relevance of learning styles theory to curriculum design and teaching.
  2. Apply learning styles theory to the design and delivery of educational sessions.
  3. Reflect upon personal learning style as a facilitator to improve teaching.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-036-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

10:05 a.m.–10:20 a.m.

Beverage Break

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom Prefunction, Third Level

10:20 a.m.–10:50 a.m.

Grit, Resilience, Motivation, and Mindset: What Are We Talking About, Why Should We Care, and Can We Cultivate It?

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom B, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

Grit as a concept has become wildly popular recently and with this popularity has come both proponents and detractors of the psychological measurement itself, but are there practical applications of grit that pharmacy educators can use? In this short session, attendees are invited to explore the invisible “it” factor, discuss underlying psychological theory behind motivation and grit, and develop concrete ways to move this concept from theory to practice both in themselves and their students.

(Speaker) Adam Pate, The University of Mississippi

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the psychological construct of motivation and its relation to grit, resilience, mindset, etc.
  2. Explain ways to cultivate and develop motivation.
  3. Develop an implementation plan for applying concepts to personal experience.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-037-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

10:20 a.m.–10:50 a.m.

Utilizing Personalized COACHing as a Means to Enhance Learner Development Across Multiple Pharmacy Settings

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom A, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

In this session, attendees will gain exposure to the C.O.A.C.H. framework which serves as model for building strong relationships and advance learner development and progress in practice, research, teaching and more! The session will highlight concepts such as the optimistic stance, the ask-tell spectrum which attendees can use during their own personal coaching situations. Students, residents and seasoned faculty members will find new concepts, techniques and ideas to enhance their abilities and become optimal coaches regardless of practice or research area.

(Speaker) Kyle M. Turner, The University of Utah

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explore the C.O.A.C.H. framework as a means to engage learners in their own person and professional development.
  2. Determine one’s own coaching tendency based on the ask-tell spectrum.
  3. Apply coaching principles to a current professional situation.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-038-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

11:00 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Creating Your Personal Development Plan—It’s All About You

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom B, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

While professionals often plan for their first job after school or training, many struggle with preparing for the changing needs of what is hopefully a dynamic career. Learn how to lead your own career maturation, rather than simply managing a career change, by using the continuous professional development framework.

(Speaker) Kelly M. Smith, University of Georgia

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Construct a time-sensitive plan that stimulates intentional career self-reflection and personal value assessment.
  2. Develop an accountability measure for at least one component of your personal development plan.
  3. Propose a group of colleagues to serve as a personal board of directors.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-049-L04-P, 0.75 Contact Hour)

11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Lunch and Sharing Activity

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom C, Third Level

Private lunch for Teachers Seminar participants only.

1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Looking in the Mirror: The Importance of Critical Self-Reflection

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom B, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

Critical self-reflection is a conscious exploration of an individual’s past experiences to identify new ways of learning or approaching future tasks. Learner self-reflection is a component of the life-long learning process and should complement other forms of feedback from both peers and faculty. No single self-reflection process will apply to all learners; instead it should be personalized based on individual learning preferences and tendencies. Faculty should integrate a diversity of self-reflection activities into their teaching in both the classroom and experiential environments. Effective self-reflection can increase student self-awareness and positively contribute to individual and group learning experiences.

(Speaker) Craig D. Cox, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define the concept of critical self-reflection and how it can benefit a student’s learning experience.
  2. Describe teaching strategies to effectively utilize critical self-reflection in both the classroom and experiential settings.
  3. Participate in a self-reflection exercise focused on examining your ability to teach others to critically self-reflect.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-039-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Utilizing Personalized COACHing as a Means to Enhance Learner Development Across Multiple Pharmacy Settings

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom A, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

In this session, attendees will gain exposure to the C.O.A.C.H. framework which serves as model for building strong relationships and advance learner development and progress in practice, research, teaching and more! The session will highlight concepts such as the optimistic stance, the ask-tell spectrum which attendees can use during their own personal coaching situations. Students, residents and seasoned faculty members will find new concepts, techniques and ideas to enhance their abilities and become optimal coaches regardless of practice or research area.

(Speaker) Kyle M. Turner, The University of Utah

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explore the C.O.A.C.H. framework as a means to engage learners in their own person and professional development.
  2. Determine one’s own coaching tendency based on the ask-tell spectrum.
  3. Apply coaching principles to a current professional situation.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-040-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

1:40 p.m.–2:10 p.m.

Mindlessness to Mindfulness

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom B, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

When you perform multiple tasks at once, your brain tends to shift into autopilot. Multi-tasking denies essential pauses in our mental space and contributes to increased levels of faculty and student burnout. Mindfulness is defined as a mental state achieved by focusing one’s present awareness on thoughts, emotions or experiences. This session will focus on identifying personalized areas to incorporate mindfulness techniques into your everyday activities, developing mindfulness skills to manage stress, relieve anxiety and irritability, as well as cultivating positive relationships within your classroom.

(Speaker) Emily R. Esposito, Sullivan University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define mindfulness and identify areas which might benefit from integration.
  2. Provide tools to develop a personalized plan of mindfulness to manage stress and minimize anxiety.
  3. Incorporate aspects of mindfulness into the classroom for the benefit of both faculty and students.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-042-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

 

1:40 p.m.–2:10 p.m.

Using Teams in Learning—Better Teams; Better Function

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom A, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

This session will discuss how to create teams of students so that they function at a high level. Different strategies will be provided to bring teams together, and the audience will share their experiences in creating high-functioning teams.

(Speaker) Steven J. Martin, Ohio Northern University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify learning outcomes from team-based experiences and describe three measurable metrics for assessing if the team-based exercise learning objectives were met.
  2. Differentiate students based on one key characteristic (academic performance, Strengths Finders Talents, etc.), and identify how you would build a team based on that metric.
  3. Construct a team-based project or experience that has team-based and individual-based learning objectives and assessment metrics.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-043-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

2:10 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Beverage Break

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom Prefunction, Third Level

2:30 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

The Competency-Based Curriculum: Dismantling Time-Based Curricula in Favor of Personalized Learning

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom B, Third Level

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

Competency-based education (CBE) is a framework for defining the outcomes and processes of education that has been adopted by many health professions associations and schools. CBE has many implications for learning methods, assessment, curricular design and implementation, administration and leadership. Of particular significance is the shift from current fixed time-variable outcome educational models to fixed outcomes-time variable models. Implementation of time variable, competency-based education requires a new emphasis on individualized learning rather than group teaching. This session will examine the underlying principles of CBE and some of the logistics of individualized learning with opportunity for problem solving and discussion by the audience.

(Speaker) Larry D. Gruppen, University of Michigan Medical School

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the key principles of competency-based education.
  2. Evaluate the extent to which these principles are present in their own curricular domains.
  3. Consider the possibilities of individualized, time-variable education as an option to traditional curricular designs.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-044-L04-P, 0.75 Contact Hour)

Programming

Friday and Saturday

Friday, July 20

4:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Two Locations: Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level; and Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Please check in and pick up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2018 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

Saturday, July 21

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

AACP Walmart Scholars Orientation

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom A, Third Level

Required session for the AACP Walmart Scholars, so that they may make the most of their experience at the Annual Meeting.

(Moderator) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (President) Steven A. Scott, Purdue University; (Immediate Past President) Joseph T. DiPiro, Virginia Commonwealth University

7:00 a.m.–6:30 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Two Locations: Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level; and Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Please check in and pick up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2018 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. (Certificate), 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. (Train-theTrainer)

NACDS Community Pharmacy-based Point-of-Care Testing Certificate & Train-the-Trainer Programs

Hynes Convention Center, 3rd Level, Room 305

Hosted by POC Consultants, Inc.

Fee: Cost per participant is $150–$350, depending on the sessions desired. 

To register for one or both sessions, click this link. Deadline to register is Wednesday, July 18.

Students: Interested in earning a Point-of-Care Testing Certificate? Graduate Students, Faculty: Need 20 contact hours of CPE? Deans, Academia: Want to offer the NACDS POCT Certificate program as course curriculum? These back-to-back sessions not only provide students with an opportunity to earn their certificate, they offer pharmacy schools a practical way to begin offering the NACDS POCT Certificate program as part of the PharmD curriculum. Due to an update to the program format, faculty can now earn the certificate and be trained as instructors all in one day. Description: Participants gain skills necessary to develop and implement a collaborative testing program for influenza, Group A streptococcus, HIV and hepatitis C. The course's ACPE accredited 20 hours of CE (16 home study, 4 live training) covers targeted disease states, physical assessments of patients presenting to a community pharmacist, point-of-care tests and how to establish a point-of-care testing service. The Train-the-Trainer program qualifies the participant as an official NACDS POCT Certificate program instructor. Learn more on the NACDS Education website.

(Instructor) Donald G. Klepser, PhD, MBA; (Instructor) Keith M. Olsen, PharmD, FCCP, FCCM

Noon–6:00 p.m.

PharmCAS R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Sheraton: Fairfax, Third Floor

Taking care of business sometimes requires taking care of yourself in the process. AACP is making it easy with the PharmCAS R&R Lounge—designed to offer attendees a brief but much-needed respite from crowds, noise and other common meeting stresses, while keeping you fresh for the business of learning and networking. Kick up your feet, check your e-mail, charge your phone, tablet or laptop and unwind. There will be four laptop kiosks available on a first-come, first-served basis. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment. With support from our sponsor, PharmCAS, powered by Liaison, the lounge services are complimentary so make time to stop by for a little R&R! AACP would like to thank Liaison for their sponsorship to support the R&R Lounge and the University of Florida for staffing it.

 

1:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

School Poster Session

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

Annual Meeting Registration & Name Badge Required

This year's theme is "Complementary Approaches With a Common Mission: Connecting the Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacy Practice." Presenter attendance recommended from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Council of Deans Administrative Board Meeting

Sheraton: Boardroom, Third Floor

Closed business meeting of the elected leaders of the Council of Deans.

(Chair) Anne Y. Lin, Notre Dame of Maryland University

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Council of Faculties Administrative Board Meeting

Sheraton: Beacon E, Third Floor

Closed business meeting of the elected leaders of the Council of Faculties.

(Chair) Stuart T. Haines, The University of Mississippi

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Development Directors SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Gardner, Third Floor

Intended Audience: Development Directors Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section

Annual Business Meeting for the Development Directors SIG.

(Chair) Kori Caldwell, Auburn University

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Junior Faculty and First Timers Annual Meeting Orientation and Networking Session

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Attendees are invited to a session to share, learn and network with colleagues about the wonderful opportunities available during the AACP Annual Meeting.

(President) Steven A. Scott, Purdue University; (Chair) Stuart T. Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Matt Cipriani, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Terry J. Ryan, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jamie L. Wagner, The University of Mississippi

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Rho Chi Meeting

Sheraton: Commonwealth, Third Floor

By Invitation Only

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Council of Sections Business Meeting

Sheraton: Beacon D, Third Floor

Closed business meeting of the Council of Sections members, consisting of the section chairs, chairs-elect and immediate past chairs. Section secretaries are also invited to attend.

(Chair) Steven C. Stoner, University of Missouri-Kansas City

3:45 p.m.– 5:45 p.m.

Art of the Schmooze: Strategic, Effective, and Inclusive Networking

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Introductory

Career progression often depends on fostering a strong and supportive professional network, but do you feel awkward at networking events and uncomfortable making new connections? Students, residents, fellows and faculty are invited to attend this engaging workshop that will offer tips and tricks to help extroverts and introverts learn how to work a room, from having the right tools to knowing the best approach to engage prospective colleagues and collaborators. No matter your role, you will benefit from learning how to be more strategic, effective and inclusive while building great relationships.

(Speaker) Robbie Samuels, Author, Croissants vs. Bagels

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Catholic Pharmacists Mass

St. Francis Chapel

Everyone is welcome!

AACP members interested in attending the Catholic Mass should plan on meeting at the Chapel. St. Francis Chapel is located in the Prudential Center, outside the Sheraton Boston Hotel.

(Moderator) Edward M. DeSimone II, Creighton University

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Highlighting #RxInnovation: Postcards to Your Legislators

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Feeling frustrated about inconsistent support for research and STEM education on Capitol Hill? Want to make your voice heard but don't know where to start? Join the conversation on the pivotal role that research, practice and education at colleges and schools of pharmacy plays in moving the health enterprise forward. AACP staff will be on hand to help you craft your message, and you'll be able to write a postcard to your legislator that shares your story of pharmacy research improving lives.

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Rho Chi Reception

Sheraton: Commonwealth, Third Floor

By Invitation Only

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section Welcome

Sheraton: Hampton, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section

All interested librarians and information professionals are invited to this orientation to AACP Annual Meeting programs and events. The session will also include information for the Grace and Harold Sewell Memorial Fund stipend recipients regarding the requirements of their awards. An overview of the section mentorship program will also be provided.

(Moderator) Leslie A. Bowman, University of the Sciences; (Chair) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) Melissa L. Hunter, University of Wyoming

 

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Welcome Reception

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Complex, Second Floor

Kick off Pharmacy Education 2018 at the AACP Welcome Reception. Enjoy hors d'ouevres and beverages while getting to network with your peers. Don't miss the opportunity to preview School Posters with the authors too!

 

7:30 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section Welcome Dinner

Off-Site: Fogo de Chão Boston

Introductory

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section

No host welcome social hour and dinner for all members of the Library and Information Science Section and their guests.

(Chair) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University

 

7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

ALFP Cohort 14 Commencement Celebration

Sheraton: Republic Ballroom, Second Floor

Dinner and graduation ceremony for ALFP Cohort 14.

Sunday

Sunday, July 22

All day

Highlighting #RxInnovation: Postcards to Your Legislators

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Feeling frustrated about inconsistent support for research and STEM education on Capitol Hill? Want to make your voice heard but don't know where to start? Join the conversation on the pivotal role that research, practice and education at colleges and schools of pharmacy plays in moving the health enterprise forward. Stop by at any point in the day to mail a postcard to your legislator, or AACP staff will be on hand before the Opening General Session, from 7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m., to help you craft your message.

All day

Meet the Editor

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education? Do you have a question about AJPE? Stop by and meet the editor, associate editors and editorial staff of AJPE. We'll be here during breakfast and beverage break times!

(Editor) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom Foyer, Third Level

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

ALFP Alumni Breakfast

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Breakfast for alumni to network with one another.

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Prayer Breakfast

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Limited Seating.

Grab your continental breakfast and join us for the prayer breakfast.

(Speaker) Jeffrey T. Copeland, University of the Incarnate Word

7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Insights Into the Academy

Hynes Convention Center: Room 307

By invitation only

An opportunity for AACP members to share industry feedback about their professional roles, responsibilities and needs with the sales team supporting exhibit and sponsorship efforts for the Annual Meeting. Participants please feel free to bring in your coffee and continental breakfast.

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

First House of Delegates Sign-In

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

All delegates are required to sign in on Sunday and Wednesday so the Credentials Committee can determine the quorum for business.

(Speaker) Daniel A. Brazeau, University of New England; (Speaker) Evan T. Robinson, Western New England University

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Networking Rooms 1, 2 and 3

Sheraton: Beacon D, E & F, Third Floor

Want to catch up with old friends, meet new ones or discuss similar interests? Want to continue the discussion from a fantastic session? Come to the Networking Rooms or schedule time at the AACP Registration and Help Desk.

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Two Locations: Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level; and Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Please check in and pick up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2018 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Meditation Room

Sheraton: Beacon A, Third Floor

Wellness is a concept and a state of being that everyone must embrace. Make your well-being a priority at Pharmacy Education 2018 by visiting the Meditation Room, where you can meditate, reflect, pray or just be quiet and still. It’s a place free from distractions and the hustle and bustle of our everyday lives.

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Opening General Session: How to Be Happy at Work: The Power of Purpose, Hope and Friendship

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom ABC, Third Level

Introductory

Dr. Annie McKee has developed a model for individual and organizational success that starts with a belief that is shared by the hundreds of leaders she has counseled over the years: happiness at work is the key to excellence. What, then, makes people happy and engaged at work? First, we need to start by escaping “happiness traps” – beliefs and ways of engaging with work that leave us burned up, burned out, and miserable. Then, we need to seek purpose on the job and find ways to live our values and have a positive impact. We need a personally compelling vision of the future that is tied to our organization’s as well as our own personal hopes and dreams. Finally, we need friends at work with whom we share trust, generosity, and goals. We need to feel that we belong to a group of like-minded, yet wonderfully diverse people. Annie McKee shows us that when we are happy, when purpose, hope and friendships are part of our work life, we can aspire to greatness individually and together.

(President) Steven A. Scott, Purdue University; (Speaker) Annie McKee, Best-Selling Author and Senior Fellow, University of Pennsylvania

Knowledge-based

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

PharmCAS R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Sheraton: Fairfax, Third Floor

Taking care of business sometimes requires taking care of yourself in the process. AACP is making it easy with the PharmCAS R&R Lounge—designed to offer attendees a brief but much-needed respite from crowds, noise and other common meeting stresses, while keeping you fresh for the business of learning and networking. Kick up your feet, check your e-mail, charge your phone, tablet or laptop and unwind. There will be four laptop kiosks available on a first-come, first-served basis. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment. With support from our sponsor, PharmCAS, powered by Liaison, the lounge services are complimentary so make time to stop by for a little R&R! AACP would like to thank Liaison for their sponsorship to support the R&R Lounge and the University of Florida for staffing it.

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Spouse/Guests Hospitality Room

Sheraton: Beacon G, Third Floor

9:00 a.m.–10:00 p.m. (Info Desk: 12:00 p.m.–3:00pm)

NACDS Foundation Meet & Greet

Boylston Hallway, Hynes Convention Center Third Level

Stop by and see us! Want to know more about the NACDS mission and vision and how you can get involved? Visit with NACDS Foundation staff, scholars and many friends at our “Meet & Greet.” We’ll be answering questions about our education programs, research agenda and other initiatives.

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom Prefunction, Third Level

9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

AACP Headshot Café

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

9:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Annie McKee Book Signing

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

Join keynote speaker Annie McKee, Ph.D., as she signs copies of her book, How to Be Happy at Work: The Power of Purpose, Hope and Friendship. Based on extensive research and decades of experience with leaders, this book reveals that people must have three essential elements in order to be happy at work: A sense of purpose and the chance to contribute to something bigger than themselves; a vision that is powerful and personal, creating a real sense of hope; and resonant, friendly relationships. How to Be Happy at Work deepens our understanding of what it means to be truly fulfilled and effective at work and provides clear, practical advice and instruction for how to get there—no matter what job you have. Books will be available onsite for purchase.

(Speaker) Annie McKee

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Combining Your Teaching & Research Efforts: Integrating Student Learning Experiences Into Your Practice-Based Research

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016 acknowledge and encourage the inclusion of research-related experiences within the curriculum to better prepare student pharmacists to approach the complex demands of the healthcare system. Session participants will identify ways to combine their teaching and research efforts by integrating student pharmacists into their practice-based research programs.

(Speaker) Stefanie P. Ferreri, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Chelsea E. Renfro, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe approaches taken to integrate student practice-based research experiences throughout a curriculum.
  2. Recognize methods that effectively transform faculty research efforts into learning experiences for students.
  3. Identify ways to incorporate student learning experiences into your research.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-045-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Using the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment to Remediate Students at Risk for Poor NAPLEX Performance

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

The Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) can be an effective early measure of student readiness for the NAPLEX. The presenters will discuss how the PCOA is used at the University of Colorado to identify students in need of early intervention and the subsequent remediation program. Steps for developing benchmarks, the remediation process, and stakes will be discussed. Four years of data demonstrating improvement in PCOA performance and improved performance on the NAPLEX will be presented.

(Speaker) Jason Brunner, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Kari L. Franson, University of Colorado

10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 1

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app and the Official Meeting Program.

(Moderator) Schwanda K. Flowers, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

First House of Delegates Session

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom ABC, Third Level

All Annual Meeting attendees are welcome to come and hear reports from AACP leaders and guests, including incoming President David D. Allen's remarks. Candidates for the office of President-elect, Treasurer and Speaker-elect will be introduced during the session and an initial report on the business before the House will be provided by the Bylaws & Policy Development Committee.

(Speaker of the House) Michael L. Manolakis, Wingate University; (President-elect) David D. Allen, The University of Mississippi

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription Medicine SIG: Interprofessional Approaches to Self-Care Education in Oral Health

Hynes Convention Center: Room 309, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription Medicine Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

This program is intended for faculty members of the Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIG and the Interprofessional Education (IPE) Community as it will discuss a variety of interprofessional approaches to provide pharmacy students exposure to oral health management. Collaborative teaching and learning experiences will be discussed, including an overview and demonstration of active learning tools that can be incorporated into both the classroom and/or experiential settings. The session will also discuss development of interprofessional relationships with dental medicine practitioners and dental hygienists.

(Moderator) Kristy L. Brittain, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Lisa Palmisano, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Jennifer Mazan, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Kaelen Dunican, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Stephanie L. Conway, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Lucio Volino, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the importance of collaborative care between dentistry and pharmacy and how educational experiences in self-care can provide exposure to interprofessional oral health practices.
  2. Describe the development and implementation of interprofessional, community-based experiences involving pharmacy students, dental students, and dental hygiene students.
  3. Discuss didactic, active-learning, and small-group methods utilized in teaching oral healthcare within a self-care course.
  4. Utilize active learning teaching tools to teach self-care oral health principles to pharmacy students in both the didactic and experiential settings.
  5. Assess the impact of interprofessional education activities on students’ knowledge of oral health and over-the-counter oral health products.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-047-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.-4:15 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program

Sheraton: Riverway, Fifth Floor

Intended Audience: Administrative and Finance Officers Special Interest Group

Fee: $350 ($75 with a full conference registration). Pre-registration recommended; registration includes lunch and Sunday morning’s sessions.

See Pre-session listing for detailed information.

The Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG programs are designed for administrative and financial officers as well as other AACP participants interested in key administrative issues influencing the operations of colleges of pharmacy. Building relationships is essential to working collectively and establishing team environments. At the annual meeting, the SIG will host several sessions including operationalizing diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives as well as other aspects of building relationships across the operational centers of a college.

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Students Teaching Students: Tackling Public Health Issues in Adolescents Through Pharm.D. Student-Driven Education Initiatives

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Experiential Education Section; Public Health Special Interest Group

Presenters will discuss incorporation of Pharm.D. student developed and led, teen-centered, public health presentations into an elective advanced pharmacy practice experience. Public health topics include dangers of electronic cigarettes and prescription medication abuse in the setting of an opioid crisis. The audience will participate in the interactive games utilized in the teen presentations. Presenters will also describe challenges faced in development of teen appropriate content, supporting Pharm.D. student as independent presenters, and opportunities for scholarship.

(Speaker) Cheryl Abel, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Amanda Morrill, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the incorporation of public health centered pharmacy student -led presentations to teens into an elective APPE rotation in the context of Domain 3 of the CAPE outcomes.
  2. Describe benefits of presentations led by pharmacy students to a teen audience for both the pharmacy and high school students.
  3. Demonstrate the use of an interactive platform utilized to increase teen engagement.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-048-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Taking your SoTL to the Next Level: Design-Based Research

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

How can schools produce innovative educational research that meets emerging practice needs? Design-based research offers an iterative problem-solving technique intended to address ill-defined problems while providing strategies to develop, test, and refine novel education solutions. This workshop will describe the design-based research process, connect concepts to health professions education, and allow participants to engage in the first steps through a rapid design sample.

(Speaker) Kayley M. Lyons, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Teacher of the Year Luncheon

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

By Invitation Only

(President) Steven A. Scott, Purdue University

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Women Faculty SIG: Luncheon and Business Meeting

Sheraton: Republic Ballroom, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Women Faculty Special Interest Group

Fee: $50; limited availability. Ticket and Name Badge Required

The 2018 Women Faculty SIG programming will focus on a facilitated discussion of the book club disseminated at the 2017 annual luncheon: Daring Greatly by Brene Brown. Two faculty will co-lead this facilitated discussion sharing principles from the book as it relates to personal and professional application in work life integration.

(Chair) Tonja M. Woods, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University; (Speaker) Amy L. Pittenger, University of Minnesota

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

PCAT Prep Advisory Committee Meeting

Sheraton: The Fens, Fifth Floor

Closed Meeting

(Chair) Mary L. Euler, West Virginia University

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Administrative Services Section: Implementing Staff Development on a Limited (or Non-Existent) Budget

Hynes Convention Center: Room 305, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Administrative and Finance Officers Special Interest Group; Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section

Staff play a central role in the daily operations at schools of pharmacy (SOP). However, the current economic climate has negatively affected campus budgets, leaving many SOPs financially stressed to provide staff with additional training and support. Yet professional development is crucial for staff engagement, productivity, and retention. This session will discuss budget-friendly resources to provide staff with career and professional development opportunities that enhance their role-related skills (Standard 19: Faculty and Staff–Qualitative Factors).

(Speaker) Karen J. Kopacek, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Joel P. Spiess, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Myrah Stockdale, Campbell University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Understand methods for deploying needs assessments for staff development.
  2. Describe appropriate/important professional development activities for staff and how these are different or similar to professional development activities for faculty and students. 3. Design a professional development series that educates staff on areas of identified need.
  3. Discuss ways in which your program can support staff professional development on a limited budget.

Application-based

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Biological Sciences Section: Curricular Smoothie: Putting Clinical and Basic Science in a Blender

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Biological Sciences Section; Chemistry Section; Pharmacy Practice Section

Pharmacy educators strive to construct courses and assessments that preserve clinical and scientific content while developing the students’ ability to holistically utilize the information. Educators who have effectively integrated clinical and basic science will discuss their experiences in combining individual components of a course into an entirely blended course. Attendees will gain a sense of approaches that they can apply in courses and assessments, and discuss variations that they can consider for their unique situations.

(Speaker) Carolyn Friel, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) Clark Kebodeaux, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Vincent J. Venditto, University of Kentucky

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify three potential approaches to integration that could be applied within a current course.
  2. Explain common hurdles that may need to be addressed in course integration, as well as approaches to managing those hurdles.
  3. Describe approaches to crafting integrated exam questions.
  4. Identify at least one “lesson learned” and one new strategy.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-050-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Chemistry Section & COF Junior Faculty Learning Community: Making Connections: Career Success Through Partnership, Team and Community Building

Hynes Convention Center: Room 311, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Continuing Professional Development Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Professional relationship development can be accomplished in many ways. The AACP Junior Faculty Learning Community has invited three experienced faculty members to share how the teams, partnerships and learning communities in which they have participated have contributed to their success. Current evidence-based models for partnership, team and community building will be reviewed and applied to experiences in pharmacy education. Speakers will present practical strategies for the audience to implement in their own professional relationship building.

(Moderator) Kathryn J. Smith, University of Florida; (Speaker) Stuart T. Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Continuing Professional Development Section: CPE Comprehensive Overview and Training: Standards and Application

Hynes Convention Center: Room 310, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Continuing Professional Development Section; Experiential Education Section

Sixty-five percent of all Colleges of Pharmacies are CPE Providers as well. College-based CPE programs serve as a significant source of pharmacy continuing education after the Pharm.D. for all pharmacists in the U.S. and beyond. This session will include a summary of the ACPE CPE Standards along with panel discussions involving CPE directors from around the country providing real-life CPE activity examples, and information on how to design, manage, and implement quality CPE programming.

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Baumgartner, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE); (Speaker) Peter J. Hughes, Samford University; (Speaker) Glen E. Baumgart, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Dimitra V. Travlos, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE); (Speaker) James Wheeler, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recall the CPE Standards for CPE Providers.
  2. Discuss how to implement the Standards into CPE programing.
  3. Discuss and share examples of CPE programming.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-052-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Experiential Education Section: Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs)—A Discussion of Incorporation Into Experiential Education & Assessment Tools

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

AACP adopted Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for pharmacy schools to use as a tool to ensure students are practice ready upon graduation from a school or college of pharmacy. Experiential education programs are charged with incorporating EPAs into Introductory and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences. This program will discuss the mapping of EPAs, the development and implementation of activities and evaluation tools, as well as details about how to train preceptors to utilize the assessment tools.

(Moderator) Maryann Z. Skrabal, Creighton University; (Speaker) Jennie B. Jarrett, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Tamara McCants, Howard University; (Speaker) Tina J. Kanmaz, St. John's University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize the work of the ‘Mapping EPAs Task Force’—which mapped the EPAs to the essential elements for core APPEs, ACPE Standards, CAPE Outcomes, PPCP, and NAPLEX.
  2. Describe the development and implementation of EPA activities and evaluation tools, as well as the challenges faced and lessons learned during the process.
  3. Outline steps colleges may take to incorporate EPAs as an evaluation tool into IPPE & APPE, including preceptor training and development to properly use the tool.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-053-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Winner Takes All: Debating the Merits of Quantitative and Qualitative Research

Sheraton: Commonwealth, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Selecting an approach to studying education can be challenging. Which is better: quantitative research or qualitative research? Session participants will hear researchers trained in each approach debate the merits of these methodologies in a series of point-counterpoint arguments. Presenters will provide strategies for the development of rigorous and systematic research using each methodology. Participants will gain insight into the advantages and limitations of each approach and practice drafting quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies.

(Speaker) Antonio A. Bush, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the advantages and limitations of quantitative research in pharmacy education.
  2. Describe the advantages and limitations of qualitative research in pharmacy education.
  3. Identify potential opportunities to utilize each approach independently or for mixed methods research.
  4. Design studies using quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods designs.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-054-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Pharmaceutics Section: Challenges of the Middle Years of the Academic Professor

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmaceutics Section; Biological Sciences Section; Chemistry Section

Typically mid-career faculty includes those who have achieved tenure status and have been at rank for at least five years post-tenure. A 2013 report from the Faculty Career Development Services, The Wallace Center at the Rochester Institute of Technology showed faculty need different kinds of support and opportunities at different career stages and that many associate professors across the country are now struggling through the long years of mid-career, which can be marked by exhaustion, doubt and even depression. The study found that mid-career faculty can easily reach a plateau where professional goals are less clear, even while an array of attractive personal and professional options may be available. This session will focus on starting the discussion towards the development of a model for mid-career faculty development in pharmacy schools. It will present promising practices in mid-career faculty development highlighting exemplar models and promising practices in mid-career faculty development from institutions across the country.

(Moderator) Melgardt M. de Villiers, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Nicholas G. Popovich, University of Illinois at Chicago

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define mid-career malaise, the rank-specific issues for mid-career faculty that are fundamentally different than they are for pre-tenure faculty.
  2. Discuss how faculty vitality and institutional productivity are co-dependent and enrich each other exponentially.
  3. Identify exemplar models and promising practices of mid-career faculty development.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-055-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: What’s the Balancing Act of Academia?—Application of the Layered Learning Practice Model

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section

Pharmacy practice faculty are often faced with the challenge of balancing the numerous responsibilities of didactic and experiential teaching, service/practice and scholarship. A panel of pharmacy faculty will discuss examples of successful application of the Layered Learning Practice Model as a strategic framework to allow for a more effective balancing of responsibilities and to minimize burnout. Attendees will learn and develop their own personal plan of work balance using aspects of the model discussed.

(Moderator) Lakesha M. Butler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Sarah L. Anderson, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Milena M. McLaughlin, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Nicole P. Reitter, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss successful techniques for integrating multiple levels of learner (student and resident) into one’s practice site.
  2. Describe tools for successful incorporation of students into faculty research projects.
  3. Discuss challenges and opportunities to strengthen delivery of the Layered Learning Practice Model using a validated educational framework.
  4. Describe techniques for pharmacy faculty juggling multiple roles and responsibilities to prevent or minimize burnout and enhance well-being.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-056-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Social and Administrative Sciences Section: Transforming Practice Through Research

Hynes Convention Center: Room 309, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Experiential Education Section

This session will describe research approaches that have led to innovations in pharmacy practice. Specifically, the program will identify effective strategies to assess the impact of academic partnerships on advancing practice-based research at professional practice sites. This session will utilize a round table format to foster discussion and engagement among participants.

(Moderator) Pamela Heaton, University of Cincinnati; (Speaker) Omolola A. Adeoye, Purdue University; (Speaker) Jill M. Augustine, Mercer University; (Speaker) Duska M. Franic, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Nicholas E. Hagemeier, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Ana L. Hincapie, University of Cincinnati; (Speaker) Sally A. Huston, Keck Graduate Institute; (Speaker) Abby A. Kahaleh, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Lourdes G. Planas, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Marie A. Smith, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Margie E. Snyder, Purdue University; (Speaker) Terri L. Warholak, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Salisa C. Westrick, Auburn University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss theories and study designs to assess practice-based innovations.
  2. Illustrate the use of academic and community partnerships to advance innovative practice research.
  3. Compare the impact of various innovative practice-based research projects.
  4. Explain the use of research to support (inter)professional practice.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-057-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Administrative Services Section: Business Meeting

Hynes Convention Center: Room 305, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section; Administrative and Finance Officers Special Interest Group; Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

The Administrative Services Section will conduct the business of the section including chair and committee reports, membership updates and planning for the Section for the next year.

(Chair) Bernadette K. Brown, Butler University; (Speaker) Jill A. Morgan, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Heather MW Petrelli, University of South Florida

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Award for Excellence in Assessment

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Recipients of the 2018 Award for Excellence in Assessment will present their award-winning submissions.

(Moderator) Therese I. Poirier, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speakers) Eric H. Gilliam, Jason M. Brunner, Toral C Patel, University of Colorado, presenting Unique Assessments for Unique Experiences: Content Validation of Three Assessment Tools for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Rotations; (Speakers) Maria Miller Thurston, Jill Augustine, Lea Bonner, Mercer University, presenting Multimodal assessment of a co-curricular professional engagement program

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Biological Sciences Section: Business Meeting

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Biological Sciences Section; Chemistry Section; Pharmaceutics Section

A meeting of the section that will update members on activities of the past year and planned activities for the coming year. Committee reports will be presented and items relevant to the business of the section will be discussed and voted on, depending upon whether attendance reaches quorum.

(Chair) Daniel T. Kennedy, Western New England University; (Speaker) Timothy Bloom, Shenandoah University

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Chemistry Section: Business Meeting

Hynes Convention Center: Room 311, Third Level

Intended Audience: Chemistry Section

Annual business meeting for the Chemistry Section.

(Chair) Andrew Coop, University of Maryland

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Continuing Professional Development Section: Business Meeting

Hynes Convention Center: Room 310, Third Level

Intended Audience: Continuing Professional Development Section

Annual business meeting for the Continuing Professional Development Section.

(Chair) Glen E. Baumgart, The University of Texas at Austin

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Experiential Education Section: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section

Annual business meeting for the Experiential Education Section.

(Chair) Patricia L. Darbishire, Purdue University

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Commonwealth, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section

Annual business meeting for the Library and Information Science Section.

(Chair) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) Vern Duba, The University of Iowa

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Pharmaceutics Section: Business Meeting

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmaceutics Section

Annual business meeting for the Pharmaceutics Section.

(Chair) Charles S. Asbill, Campbell University

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section

Annual business meeting for the Pharmacy Practice Section.

(Chair) Paul O. Gubbins, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) LaKesha M. Butler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Michael Neville, Wingate School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Kristi Kelley, Auburn University

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Social and Administrative Sciences Section: Business Meeting

Hynes Convention Center: Room 309, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Social and Administrative Sciences Section

This session will be used to conduct the business of the Social and Administrative Sciences Section. Updates on recent section activities and initiatives will be provided. Introductions of graduate students, Pharm.D. students, fellows and residents in attendance will be made. Future directions of the section will be discussed. New section officers will be installed.

(Chair) Ana C. Quiñones-Boex, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Special Session: Better, Cheaper, Faster, Easier: The Story of Four Educational Technology Innovations in Pharmacy Education

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

This session is for the curious, the disruptors and the skeptics. An emerging trend in pharmacy education is the creation of advanced technology-based educational technologies. Four investigators of pharmacy education technology will discuss their challenges and lessons learned in funding, designing, implementing and promoting their systems. These technologies range from narrated slides to artificial intelligence-based patient modeling. In a crowdsourced activity, attendees will have the chance to pose problems in pharmacy education and receive feedback from other participants. Attendees will also get their burning questions answered in a directed panel discussion.

(Moderator and Speaker) Kayley M. Lyons, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) Robert Hubal, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Conan MacDougall, University of California, San Francisco

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss funding, design, technology, development and implementation pathways for faculty-created educational technology.
  2. Identify an area or activity in pharmacy education that is too inadequate, expensive, slow, or difficult (i.e. the problem) and has potential for technology-based solution.
  3. Explore whether your self-identified problem is relevant to other program participants.

Application-Based (0581-0000-18-058-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

4:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

Exhibitors’ Opening Reception and Research/Education Poster Session 1

Hynes Convention Center: Exhibit Hall D, Second Level

Name Badge Required

Hungry for information on the latest products and services to support your work? Have a thirst for new knowledge about research and education? Join the exhibitors for hors d'oeuvres and refreshments, and they’ll fill you in on new tools. From 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m., chat with peers about their posters.

4:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

Student Poster Competition

Hynes Convention Center: Exhibit Hall D, Second Level

Visit the posters of student pharmacists, graduate students, residents, fellows and postdocs. From 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m., they'll be at their posters to present their research and scholarship.

4:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

New Investigator Award Poster Session

Hynes Convention Center: Exhibit Hall D, Second Level

Interested in learning about research funded by the AACP New Investigator Award? Join the 2016–2017 NIA recipients from 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. as they talk about their NIA experiences and present the results of their research.

6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Past Presidents Dinner

Off-site: Prudential Tower, Top of the Hub

By Invitation Only

AACP past presidents dinner hosted by Immediate Past President Dr. Joseph T. DiPiro of Virginia Commonwealth University. Past presidents attending should plan to meet in the Republic Ballroom, Second Floor of the Sheraton Boston Hotel at 5:30 p.m. for a group photo.

Monday

Monday, July 23

All Day

Meet the Editor

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education? Do you have a question about AJPE? Stop by and meet the editor, associate editors and editorial staff of AJPE. We'll be here during breakfast and beverage break times!

(Editor) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University

All Day

Highlighting #RxInnovation: Postcards to Your Legislators

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Feeling frustrated about inconsistent support for research and STEM education on Capitol Hill? Want to make your voice heard but don't know where to start? Join the conversation on the pivotal role that research, practice and education at colleges and schools of pharmacy plays in moving the health enterprise forward. Stop by at any point in the day to mail a postcard to your legislator, or AACP staff will be on hand from 7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m. to help you craft your message.

6:30 a.m.–7:30 a.m.

Sunrise Yoga

Sheraton: Republic Ballroom, Second Floor

Fitness enthusiasts are welcome to enjoy a sunrise yoga class on Monday at 6:30 a.m. that allows all fitness levels to participate. The class will be held in a carpeted room so mats are not required. Sponsored by Pearson.

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Two Locations: Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level; and Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

6:45 a.m.-7:45 a.m.

Naplex Study Tools on AccessPharmacy—Hosted by McGraw Hill

Sheraton: Gardner, Third Floor

By Invitation Only

McGraw Hill’s Naplex Author, Scott Sutton will be demonstrating AccessPharmacy’s Naplex Resources. Feel free to attend and see why Dr. Sutton’s Review Course around the country is so successful! Sutton’s explanations, types of questions and interactive exercises, all have contributed to students/ schools test scores improving after attending his course review! Attend the session and if your school doesn’t have a subscription to AccessPharmacy, we will be happy to get you set-up on a trial!

6:45 a.m.-7:45 a.m.

New & Current Leadership AACP Connect Training Session

Hynes Convention Center: Room 310, Third Level

By Invitation Only

Join Matt Cipriani, AACP Connect system administrator, for an in-depth training session on AACP Connect. The training will allow users to understand the functionality and capabilities of AACP Connect and have any questions answered. All current and new Section, SIG and Council leaders are invited. Please bring your computers fully charged. You are welcome to bring your coffee and breakfast.

(Speaker) Matt Cipriani, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

6:45 a.m.-7:45 a.m.

Lilly Focus Group

Hynes Convention Center: Room 305, Third Level

By Invitation Only

6:45 a.m.-7:45 a.m.

Increasing Pharmacy Student Enrollment in a Challenging Market

Hynes Convention Center: Room 307, Third Level

As national trends demonstrate an overall decrease in applications for pharmacy programs, recruiters now must re-write their prescriptions to effectively recruit from a shrinking pool. This session will share how some pharmacy schools have deployed a new marketing platform and services. The result? An immediate, relevant, automated and trackable communication and engagement strategy to increase response and yield. Learn the keys to a successful marketing strategy, from first interest to first day, to help you build a better class.

6:45 a.m.-7:45 a.m.

Private School Breakfast

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

(Moderator) Michael A. Crouch, Samford University

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Special Interest Group (SIG) Cabinet Meeting

Sheraton: Hampton, Third Floor

The chairs, chairs-elect and immediate past chairs will meet to discuss the business of the AACP Special Interest Groups.

(Moderator) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

6:45 a.m.-7:45 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 2

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app and the Official Meeting Program.

(Moderator) Schwanda K. Flowers, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

7:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Caffeine & Connect: Council of Faculties and Department Chairs Welcome the AACP Walmart Scholars

Hynes Convention Center: Room 309, Third Level

By Invitation Only

Invited guests, please grab your continental breakfast from the main foyer and enjoy this great opportunity to network with fellow members of the AACP Council of Faculties and school department chairs. This will be a lively, casual flow including live music performed by a special guest solo guitarist.

7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk: Sheraton

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Please check in and pick up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2018 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Networking Rooms 1, 2 and 3

Sheraton: Beacon D, E & F, Third Floor

Want to catch up with old friends, meet new ones or discuss similar interests? Want to continue the discussion from a fantastic session? Come to the Networking Rooms or schedule time at the AACP Registration and Help Desk.

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Meditation Room

Sheraton: Beacon A, Third Floor

Wellness is a concept and a state of being that everyone must embrace. Make your well-being a priority at Pharmacy Education 2018 by visiting the Meditation Room, where you can meditate, reflect, pray or just be quiet and still. It’s a place free from distractions and the hustle and bustle of our everyday lives.

8:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk: Hynes

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

Please check in and pick up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2018 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: An Innovative Model for Using a Co-Curricular Program to Enhance Students’ Personal and Professional Development

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

Pharmacy educators will learn how one college created and implemented a co-curricular program that was deliberately designed to enhance students’ personal and professional development. This presentation outlines the overall design of the co-curricular program and emphasizes the use of technology in capturing participation and assessments of co-curricular activities followed by documentation in the student portfolio. A mobile device based application developed for this process will be demonstrated.

(Moderator) Robert McGory, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Graciela M. Armayor, Nova Southeastern University;  (Speaker) Rochelle Nappi, Nova Southeastern University 

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how to develop and implement a co-curricular program that addresses the affective domain.
  2. Categorize co-curricular activities that guide student personal and professional growth.
  3. Describe how technology can be used to document student participation and outcomes of co-curriculum experiences.
  4. Demonstrate the use of a mobile device based application to capture co-curricular activities.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-059-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Emergency Preparedness and Response to a Natural Disaster: Lessons Learned

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Advanced

This session will describe how the University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy prepared for and responded to the landfall of category four Hurricane María. This atmospheric phenomenon resulted in a significant disruption of basic services like power and water supply, communications and transportation, among others. Preparedness efforts, as well as contingency plans implemented to preserve the integrity of the academic programs, will be described.

 (Speaker) Wanda T. Maldonado, University of Puerto Rico; (Speaker) Frances M. Rodriguez, University of Puerto Rico

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Continuing Professional Development Section: Continuing Professional Development & Hot Topics in Healthcare

Hynes Convention Center: Room 310, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Continuing Professional Development Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

The purpose of this session is to provide an opportunity for AACP members to discuss timely issues in healthcare that represent practice or educational gaps. Looking through the lens of the continuing professional development cycle, roundtables will address individual issues and propose a framework for pharmacy education activity development. Frameworks (i.e., toolkits) could be shared on the AACP Connect site for future use by member schools and offices of continuing pharmacy education.

(Moderator) Oluwaranti R. Akiyode, Howard University; (Moderator) Glen E. Baumgart, The University of Texas at Austin; (Moderator) Barbara L. Jolly, Sullivan University; (Moderator) Cynthia P. Koh-Knox, Purdue University; (Moderator) Anne Misher, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Baumgartner, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE)

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize the main steps of the ACPE Continuing Professional Development cycle.
  2. Provide examples of suitable professional development activities for a pharmacist.
  3. Analyze an assigned practice gap and outline desired learning outcomes for pharmacists.
  4. Generate an instructional design plan for overcoming an assigned practice gap.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-060-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Council of Deans (COD) Networking Session #1: Mission Wellness: For Faculty, Administrators & Staff

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section ; Experiential Education Section; Student Services SIG

This session will focus on strategies for the promotion of wellness among faculty, administrators and staff at schools and colleges of pharmacy. This session will run twice: once from 8:00 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. and then again from 8:45 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. in order for attendees to be able to participate in both networking sessions.

(Facilitator) Michael J. Rush, Ohio Northern University; (Facilitator) Michael Smith, The University of Oklahoma

8:00 a.m.- 9:30 a.m.

Council of Deans (COD) Networking Session #2: Managing Student Accommodations for Student Success

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section; Experiential Education Section; Student Services Personnel SIG

This session will focus on issues related to student accommodations and strategies for supporting our students to achieve success. This session will run twice: once from 8:00 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. and then again from 8:45 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. in order for attendees to be able to participate in both networking sessions.

(Facilitator) Jennifer A. Henriksen, Manchester University; (Facilitator) Paul Price, Creighton University

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Minority Faculty SIG: We Don’t Just Survive, We Thrive: Key Strategies for the Success and Mentorship of Junior Faculty

Sheraton: Commonwealth, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Minority Faculty Special Interest Group; Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Transitioning into a junior faculty role, though exciting, can be daunting. Led by junior faculty with diverse experiences and a senior faculty member with experience mentoring minority faculty, this interactive session will engage current junior faculty and those considering a faculty position in developing a strategic plan, navigating academic politics, devising intentional and actionable self-care strategies. This session is also appropriate for faculty and administrators who would like to learn skills to mentor minority faculty.

(Moderator) Ashley M. Taylor, Xavier University of Louisiana; (Speaker) Antonio A. Bush, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Kendrea M. Jones, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Kimberly A. Sanders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Develop a strategic plan around an area of scholarship, teaching, or service for the approaching semester.
  2. Develop networking skills to form potential collaborative relationships and navigate academic culture.
  3. Define self-care and devise practices to intentionally integrate into their work life.
  4. Understand the significance of mentoring minority faculty.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-061-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

 

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Pharmacogenomics SIG and Health Care Ethics SIG Joint Session: Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues in the Era of Genomic Medicine: How Do We Best Educate Pharmacy Students?

Sheraton: Public Garden, Fifth Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group; Health Care Ethics Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

We are currently in an era of genomic medicine, which brings with it many ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI). This program will provide an overview of ELSI as it relates to pharmacogenomics. Presenters will discuss strategies to incorporate ELSI education into pharmacogenomics education in college/school of pharmacy curricula. This program will be jointly administered by the Pharmacogenomics SIG and the Health Care Ethics SIG.

(Chair) Christina L. Aquilante, University of Colorado; (Moderator) James W. Torr, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Roseann Gammal, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) Gabriella Douglass, Harding University; (Speaker) Philip Empey, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) James Ruble, The University of Utah

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Public Health SIG: Healthcare Reform: Training Pharmacy Students to Empower Patients to Navigate the Changing Healthcare Environment

Sheraton: Riverway, Fifth Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Public Health Special Interest Group; Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

This session will discuss different approaches to teaching students about the organization, delivery and financing of the U.S. healthcare system. Speakers will (1) present different models of didactic education regarding the U.S. healthcare system, with discussion on the challenges of confronting political ideologies, (2) discuss community partnerships for students to engage in service learning related to healthcare access and disparities, and (3) present an example of inter-professional work integrating pharmacy into public health programs.

(Moderator) Leslie Ochs, University of New England; (Speaker) Vibhuti Arya, St. John's University; (Speaker) Sharon E. Connor, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Christine Chim, St. John's University; (Speaker) Jordan R. Covvey, Duquesne University; (Speaker) Jonathan Thigpen, Notre Dame of Maryland University

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Social and Administrative Sciences Section: The Academy's Scholarly Responsibilities in an Era of Value-Based Practice Transformation

Hynes Convention Center: Room 311, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Experiential Education Section

The target audience for this seminar is deans, associate/assistant deans, department chairs, experiential directors, social and administrative pharmacy faculty, and pharmacy practice faculty. This program will focus on describing and updating participants on value-based reimbursement practice transformation. Implications for the Academy and possible models for responding to value-based systems will be presented, including examples of colleges of pharmacy who are collaborating to advance practice transformation.

(Speaker) Brian J. Isetts, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Todd D. Sorensen, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Andrew P. Traynor, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Timothy E. Welty, Drake University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast value-based practice with fee-for-service reimbursement.
  2. Identify the implications of value-based practice transformation on the academy in terms of faculty activities, student learning, and administrative policies.
  3. Develop new models for the academy to respond to and lead in value-based practice transformation.
  4. Describe emerging scholarly opportunities related to bold national aims for improving quality of care and reducing total cost of care.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-062-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Reports of the 2017-2018 Standing Committees

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom, Second Floor

The session provides interested attendees an opportunity to interact with the standing committees: Academic Affairs, Argus Commission, Professional Affairs, Research and Graduate Affairs, Strategic Engagement, and Student Affairs. Following brief presentations by committee chairs on the key recommendations contained in the report, discussions on the reports and implementation strategies will be led by committee members.

(Chair) J. Lyle Bootman, The University of Arizona; (Chair) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Chair) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University; (Chair) Gina D. Moore, University of Colorado; (Chair) Samuel M. Poloyac, University of Pittsburgh; (Chair) Susan S. Vos, The University of Iowa

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Uniquely You: Developing Your Approach to Becoming an Education Scholar

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group;Minority Faculty Special Interest Group;Women Faculty Special Interest Group

Led by a panel of AACP Distinguished Teaching Scholars, this interactive session will focus on helping new and future faculty develop their personal plan and process for maximizing scholarly output. Panelists will share their approaches to identifying a research focus, generating ideas, developing plans, and being efficient. Attendees will share their writing successes and struggles in group discussions, learn about creating good teaching portfolios, and engage panelists in a Q&A discussion.

(Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) David A. Holdford, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. List the area(s) of your scholarly focus.
  2. Reflect on your personal strategy for generating manuscript/research ideas.
  3. State the steps to consider when planning a writing/research project.
  4. Describe your personal plan for when, where, and how often to write.
  5. Identify key aspects of developing a teaching portfolio.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-077-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

PharmCAS R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Sheraton: Fairfax, Third Floor

Taking care of business sometimes requires taking care of yourself in the process. AACP is making it easy with the PharmCAS R&R Lounge—designed to offer attendees a brief but much-needed respite from crowds, noise and other common meeting stresses, while keeping you fresh for the business of learning and networking. Kick up your feet, check your e-mail, charge your phone, tablet or laptop and unwind. There will be four laptop kiosks available on a first-come, first-served basis. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment. With support from our sponsor, PharmCAS, powered by Liaison, the lounge services are complimentary so make time to stop by for a little R&R! AACP would like to thank Liaison for their sponsorship to support the R&R Lounge and the University of Florida for staffing it.

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Overcoming Barriers to Integrating Ethics Into a Pharm.D. Curriculum

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Experiential Education Section; Health Care Ethics Special Interest Group

Integrating the teaching of ethics into co-curricular activities and experiential learning can better equip students to discuss and evaluate ethical decisions in advanced practice pharmacy experiences and beyond. Yet barriers to integrating ethics education into experiential learning continue to exist in pharmacy schools. By drawing upon medical and nursing literature, this mini session will focus on facilitating a collaborative environment where educators can discuss and map novel ways to integrate ethics content into pharmacy curriculum.

(Moderator) Marcus Ferrone, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Kelsey Japs, University of California, San Francisco

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Delineate the potential areas in a Pharm.D. curriculum in which ethics can be integrated.
  2. Discuss methodologies for the implementation of ethics curricular integration.
  3. Share participant feedback regarding their views on integration feasibility and scalability.
  4. Identify common ethical dilemmas that students could face within co-curricular and experiential learning activities.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-064-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Unifying Political Advocacy Efforts: Collaboration Among Three Schools for Pharmacists’ Day at the Legislature

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Public Health Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Many pharmacy schools participate in legislative days, although it is not known how many schools collaborate on these efforts. For the past five years, all state and private pharmacy schools in West Virginia have collaborated on Pharmacists’ Day at the Legislature. Major components include creating teams of student constituents to meet with legislators; tracking bills and lobbying efforts; and providing health screenings. This session will explore how a unified effort can potentially magnify advocacy efforts.

(Speaker) Krista D. Capehart, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Susan Gardner Bissett, University of Charleston

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe current collaborative efforts among state and private pharmacy schools and organizations for legislative days.
  2. Demonstrate how a unified approach could potentially impact advocacy efforts.
  3. Compare and contrast your state’s experiences regarding legislative efforts.
  4. Identify specific strategies to collaborate with other pharmacy schools and organizations in your state.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-065-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Research/Education Poster Session 2

Hynes Convention Center: Exhibit Hall D, Second Level

Name Badge Required

Poster presenters will be at their posters from 9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Spouse/Guests Hospitality Room

Sheraton: Beacon G, Third Floor

9:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Exhibition Hall Open

Hynes Convention Center: Exhibit Hall D, Second Level

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor; and Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

AACP Headshot Café

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

10:30 a.m.–Noon

History of Pharmacy SIG: Incorporating History of Pharmacy Into a Variety of Pharm.D. Courses

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: History of Pharmacy Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Pharmacy history is a required component of the Pharm.D. curriculum and all courses can play a role in fulfilling this requirement. The presenters will discuss history of pharmacy topics relevant for seamless inclusion into therapeutics, pharmaceutics and pharmacy practice courses. They will also discuss how they have squeezed these into their already packed lecture time. Come learn more about our great profession’s heritage and participate in a history of pharmacy trivia game!

(Moderator) Michael A. Hegener, University of Cincinnati; (Speaker) David M. Baker, Western New England University; (Speaker) Catherine Taglieri, MCPHS University–Boston

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Incorporate content relevant to the history of the pharmacy into their current Pharm.D. courses.
  2. Explain the evolution of select therapeutic agents in the United States.
  3. Discuss historical practices in compounding that have shaped current pharmaceutics practices.
  4. Discuss historical milestones in pharmacy that have shaped the current practice of pharmacy, including pharmacy education and pharmacy laws.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-066-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:30 a.m.–Noon

Science Plenary: Sex as a Biological Variable in Drug Approval: Translation to Pharmacy Education

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Biological Sciences Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

The purpose of this plenary is to educate academic pharmacy administrators, faculty and staff, about current FDA practice regarding the consideration of sex differences in preclinical and clinical review of drug applications. Dr. Marjorie Jenkins will begin the session with a brief overview of the regulatory history of the inclusion of women in research activities and clinical trials. Dr. Jenkins will discuss the evaluation of potential sex differences in preclinical review throughout drug development, and the evaluation of potential sex differences in clinical review of investigational new drugs (INDs) and new drug applications (NDAs). Dr. Jenkins will then address the importance of expanding women’s health education beyond reproductive health and through working across the health professions. The session will conclude with a practical discussion of educational resources and models available to integrate clinically relevant sex and gender evidence into pharmacy school curricula.

AACP President-elect David D. Allen will present the Association's top research awards, the Paul R. Dawson Award for Excellence in Patient Care Research and Volwiler Research Achievement Award.

(Speaker) Marjorie Jenkins, U.S. Food and Drug Administration; (Speaker) Rebecca B. Sleeper, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center; (President-elect) David D. Allen, The University of Mississippi

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recognize the impact of regulatory and health research policy on the inclusion of women in clinical trials.
  2. State the requirements for the use of male and female animals in preclinical toxicity studies.
  3. Identify when and how sex is considered in the FDA drug review and approval process.
  4. Utilize available resources to expand Women’s Health Education through a sex and gender lens.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-030-L04-P, 0.75 Contact Hour)

10:30 a.m.–Noon

Special Session: Evidence-Based Admissions: The Search for the Best Applicants

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Schools are interested in maximizing admissions processes to select the best candidates. Not all programs are looking for the same candidate qualities, but all are interested in evidence-based admissions practices that assist them in selecting high quality candidates. This session will focus on evidence-based admissions processes used at three schools. A review of the data gathered, the methodology used to interpret the data, and the process created to use data in candidate selection.

(Speaker) Christopher Adkins, South University; (Speaker) Gregory L. Alston, South University; (Speaker) Wendy C. Cox, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Megan Nguyen, Western University of Health Sciences

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify key admissions variables to collect for their program.
  2. Discuss one or more analysis techniques they can use to produce usable admissions evidence.
  3. Identify two to three next steps in improving their School’s admissions process.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-067-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Boxed Lunch in the Exhibit Hall and Research/Education Poster Session 3

Hynes Convention Center: Exhibit Hall D, Second Level

Ticket and Name Badge Required

Grab a boxed lunch in the exhibit hall and take a look at more displays including the winners of the Innovations in Teaching Competition and Excellence in Assessment Award. From Noon–1:00 p.m., you can also meet with poster presenters.

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Council of Deans Business Meeting

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom, Second Floor

All members of the Council of Deans are invited to receive reports on current and future council priorities.

(Chair) Anne Y. Lin, Notre Dame of Maryland University

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Council of Faculties Business Meeting

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Annual business meeting for the Council of Faculties.

(Chair) Stuart T. Haines, The University of Mississippi

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Co-Curricular Interprofessional Activities Foster Team-Readiness, Professionalism, and Development of Self-Awareness

Hynes Convention Center: Room 310, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Prior to clinical internships, students have limited exposure to interprofessional collaboration. Co-curricular activities allow students to have real-world experiences interacting with other professions. Interprofessional, team-oriented co-curricular activities facilitate development of soft-skills such as leadership, problem-solving, advocacy and professionalism as students communicate, learn from one another and resolve team conflicts. Examples of interprofessional co-curricular collaborations at two Pharm.D. programs will be discussed. The target audience includes student services and assessment personnel, and faculty on curricular/co-curricular committees.

(Speaker) Danielle Backus, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) John Begert, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Christopher Foley, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Anne E. Hogan, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Erin Suchsland, Pacific University Oregon

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the impact of co-curricular interprofessional collaboration on student learning and the student experience.
  2. Discuss the connection between the implementation of co-curricular interprofessional collaboration with improved student profession awareness and communication.
  3. Compare and contrast implementation and assessment strategies for co-curricular interprofessional collaboration at two Pharm.D. programs.
  4. Discuss barriers to establishing a co-curricular interprofessional activities in a professional degree program.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-068-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Critical Thinking: We All Want to Teach It But How Do We Measure It?

Hynes Convention Center: Room 311, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Pharmaceutics Section

This program will describe strategies and expose participants to examples of ways to measure critical thinking in pharmacy students, since critical thinking is an important educational outcome. While teaching critical thinking is challenging, finding ways to reliably assess critical thinking is vital to closing the teaching and assessment loop. This interactive session will explore validated assessment tools and example assignments to evaluate critical thinking in the classroom and experiential settings.

(Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define critical thinking and how it compares to other thinking skills.
  2. Contrast critical thinking assessment tools.
  3. Evaluate examples of critical thinking activities.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-069-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Emphasizing the ‘LAB’ in Collaboration—Demonstrating How to Work Together Scientifically Across Cultures

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Working together is critical for pharmacy education, yet academics often struggle to inform potential collaborations with science. For those interested in working more collaboratively, we will discuss the experimentation behind PharmAlliance, the strategic partnership between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Monash University and University College London. We will open our “lab notebooks” to illustrate what we’ve learned and changed via case studies of collaborative work in teaching, practice, research, and student service.

(Speaker) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) Vivienne Mak, Monash University; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Cate Whittlesea, University College London

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe a process for evaluating and selecting international partners as part of an alliance.
  2. Identify effective implementation strategies for establishing an alliance as well as overcoming implementation barriers.
  3. Compare different international education projects and their associated impact on partnership development.
  4. Develop a plan for determining how to create a global pharmacy alliance.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-070-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: The Struggle is Real: Help Students Develop Resilience and Coping Skills

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Experiential Education Section; Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine Special Interest Group

With the recognized mental health crisis in professional programs and the research connecting student well-being to effective learning strategies and professional development, this session aims to arm faculty and preceptors with ways to help students increase resilience and coping skills. This hands-on, activity based workshop will explore tools, techniques and resources to help build resiliency for students. Participants will leave the sessions with a toolbox of resources and skills to help address this urgent need.

(Speaker) Michael W. Neville, Wingate University; (Speaker) Elizabeth T. Skoy, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Eleanor M. Vogt, University of California, San Francisco

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate easy-to-use techniques, insights and perspectives to improve wellbeing.
  2. Summarize the rapidly emerging resiliency resources and references in the professional and consumer literature.
  3. Identify learning assessment resources.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-071-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Beverage Break

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor; and Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Pearls of Wisdom: Making the Most of Your Mentoring Relationship

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Navigating academia as a junior faculty member can be intimidating. Just as daunting is providing strong guidance that is meaningful as a seasoned faculty mentor. New and senior faculty alike will learn key strategies for maximizing success in the faculty mentoring relationship, including identifying appropriate mentors and mentees, effectively utilizing mentorship time, and making the mentoring relationship beneficial to both parties.

(Speaker) Lisa Hong, Loma Linda University; (Speaker) Jennie B. Jarrett, University of Illinois at Chicago

At the end of the presentation, the attendee will be able to:

  1. Describe the process for identifying mentors and mentees both intra- and inter-institutionally.
  2. Analyze traits necessary to be an effective mentor or mentee.
  3. Apply the 10/20/60 rule to mentoring relationships to enhance the time spent together.
  4. Explain how to structure the mentoring relationship to be mutually beneficial to the mentor and mentee.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-072-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Using EPAs in Curricular Design: Planning Skills Training and Experiential Education to Produce Pharmacist Providers

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

This session will discuss the use of Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) to guide an outcomes-driven curricular design process for skills training and experiential education at the University of Washington School of Pharmacy. The process of adapting EPAs to fit the programmatic needs of the school and regional practice needs will be outlined. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss best practices for use of EPAs in curricular design.

(Speaker) Rachel A. Allen, University of Washington; (Speaker) Leigh Ann Mike, University of Washington

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Zuma Fitness Session

Sheraton: Republic Ballroom, Second Floor

Feeling energetic? Join us for a Latin-inspired Zuma class. The routines feature aerobic/fitness interval training with a combination of fast and slow rhythms that tone and sculpt. Open to all levels. Sponsored by Pearson.

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Assessment SIG: Expanding Your Assessment Toolkit: Selection, Identification, and Evaluation of Social, Behavioral, and Professional Competency Assessment

Hynes Convention Center: Room 310, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Increased emphasis has been placed on the role of social, behavioral, and professional competencies in developing practice-ready and team-ready graduates. Session participants will learn how multiple institutions select which social, behavioral, and professional competencies to assess; identify opportunities for meaningful evaluation of these competencies; and implement assessment strategies to measure student development in these competencies. Participants will gain practical strategies to adapt and apply to their own programs’ evaluation of students’ practice-readiness and team-readiness.

(Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Jacqueline M. Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Articulate why social, behavioral, and professional competencies are important in developing practice-ready and team-ready pharmacy graduates.
  2. Strategize techniques in selecting and prioritizing what social, behavioral, and professional competencies to assess.
  3. Identify opportunities for meaningful evaluation of social, behavioral, and professional competencies.
  4. Describe various assessment strategies to measure student development in social, behavioral, and professional competencies.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-073-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Chemistry Section: Beyond Formulations: How Basic Scientists Aim to Solve the Opioid Crisis

Hynes Convention Center: Room 311, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Special Interest Group; Chemistry Section; Biological Sciences Section

Pharmacists are on the front line of the opioid crisis and need a deep understanding of the issues for counseling patients. This session will delve into how the crisis developed, the pharmacological properties that lead to abuse liability (including the critical difference between dependence and reinforcing effects), what new drugs are under development that lack both dependence and reinforcement, and how to educate student pharmacists on the issues and solutions for the future.

(Chair) Andrew Coop, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Susan L. Mercer, Lipscomb University

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Deans Special Session: What Are We Doing With PCOA?

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section; Assessment Special Interest Group

The results of a national survey regarding the use of the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment® (PCOA®) in schools and colleges of pharmacy will be discussed. Examples of how schools have utilized PCOA® data for continuous quality improvement will be shared.

(Moderator) Anne Y. Lin, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Elizabeth Coyle, University of Houston; (Speaker) Justine Gortney, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Marianne McCollum, Regis University; (Speaker) Cindy Stowe, Sullivan University

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Laboratory Instructors SIG: Evaluating Performance-Based Learning and Assessment Tools in Pharmacy Skills Laboratories

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Performance-based assessments (PBAs) are used in pharmacy skills laboratories to assess students’ knowledge, skills and abilities learned and developed and to evaluate student preparedness for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences. Evaluating PBAs and PBA tools is important to help faculty assess student learning and their classroom pedagogies. This session for laboratory instructors will present various methods for evaluating PBAs and PBA tools and provide participants the opportunity to assess their own PBAs using the methods discussed.

(Chair) Karen Sando, Nova Southeastern University; (Moderator) Andrea L. Porter, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Lauren M. Caldas, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Jeanne E. Frenzel, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Kali VanLangen, Ferris State University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define the concept of prescription wrappers and identify how they can be adapted to various skills lab activities.
  2. Describe the process of creating a rubric to evaluate common pharmacist skills.
  3. Describe the process of and participate in establishing inter-rater reliability for laboratory course rubrics.
  4. Describe the process used to evaluate the effectiveness of a skills-based assessment in a laboratory-based course and strategies to improve the quality of the assessment.
  5. Identify performance-based activities where modifications are needed to meet expected student performance goals.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-074-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

National Awareness Campaign

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Join leaders from RP3, AACP's communications agency of record, to learn about the new national pharmacy awareness campaign.  They will present the research that shaped the campaign, the strategic communications plan, and creative ideas and messages.  You will learn strategies to extend the campaign reach, and will develop an understanding of key messages.

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Action! Adding Impact to Your Social and Behavioral Science Instruction

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

This session will describe simulated and active learning exercises targeting the pharmacist approach to care. Can learners achieve understanding of cultural sensitivity, socioeconomic awareness and the importance of teamwork simply through hearing the words of a lecture or reading words on a page? This session will illustrate instructional methods used in an interprofessional environment that can impact learners’ appreciation and understanding of social determinants of health and the importance of teamwork.

(Speaker) Kaelen C. Dunican, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Melissa Mattison, Western New England University; (Speaker) Beth E. Welch, Western New England University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify three social and behavioral science topics which require the development of the affective domain.
  2. Describe your current instructional methods used to teach cultural sensitivity, socioeconomic awareness, and teamwork.
  3. Explain how active learning and simulation can impact the pharmacist approach to care.
  4. Discuss one example of how you could incorporate active learning and simulation in the instruction of social and behavioral sciences.
  5. Identify other health professions which you could partner with for instruction of a social and behavioral science topic.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-075-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Assessing Pre-APPE Readiness: Three Different Models and Lessons Learned From the Field

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Three different assessments of pre-APPE readiness models to address ACPE Standard 25.8 are presented. Models include a focused four-week block of formative and summative assessments; a statistical model to predict pre-APPE readiness based on past student performance; and a longitudinal experiential curriculum coupled with mid-year P4 assessment of progress toward graduation. These models provide attendees an array of assessment methods to consider and will stimulate their capacity to envision novel strategies to assess student readiness.

(Speaker) Donald K. Blumenthal, The University of Utah; (Speaker) Nicholas Bookman, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Jason Brunner, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Gary E. DeLander, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Tanya L. Ostrogorsky, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Mark A. Munger, The University of Utah

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Articulate three unique models of Pre-APPE readiness assessment techniques.
  2. Evaluate at least one component from models presented that might be integrated into attendees’ Pre-APPE readiness plans.
  3. Envision how perspectives shared by presenters and attendees can refine existing Pre-APPE assessment plans.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-063-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Assess Yourself to Success: Building a Better Team

Hynes Convention Center: Room 309, Third Level

Introductory

Limited seating. Pre-registration required.

Learn how to build and sustain successful teams in research and practice by understanding and addressing your weaknesses and strengths. This session and a companion webinar, “Leadership and Emotional Intelligence: A Foundation for Innovation.,” focus on understanding your emotional intelligence and developing greater self-awareness and self-direction. A self-assessment will be used to formulate strategies to adapt your behavior and develop a plan to enhance your team leadership to create an environment where innovation thrives.

(Moderator) Erik Burns, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists; (Speaker) Steve Manderscheid, Concordia University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify how to leverage the major strength in their personal profile to enhance their communication style.
  2. Integrate lifelong learning into their team interactions and management style.
  3. Relate their leadership style to the environment it creates for their team and the team’s success.
  4. Develop a plan for adapting their behavior to improve their communications with team members.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-076-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Fostering Innovation Through Hacking: How Hackathons and Innovation Labs Can Create Novel Ideas Amongst Pharmacy Students

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

This program aims to introduce pharmacy educators to the growth of hackathons in the medical landscape to create and implement new ideas. Hackathons are a new process of having multiple people across different professional backgrounds working together to solve a problem (i.e., "hacking") in a short time period. Alongside "hacking," innovation labs will be discussed as lasting centers of creativity. This workshop will allow educators to learn how they can become involved in or build out their own hackathon or innovation lab. The use of these programs in fulfilling IPE activities and CAPE outcomes will also be discussed.

(Speaker) Timothy D. Aungst, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Robert S. Pugliese, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Ravi Patel, University of Pittsburgh

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Mini Session: To Journal Club or Not: Interprofessional Clinical Debates as an Alternative Method of Literature Evaluation

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group

Interprofessional education and literature evaluation are emphasized in both medical and pharmacy education, although these concepts are seldom intertwined. Journal clubs have served as a mainstay of literature evaluation; however, current reports support the idea of debates as an alternative to journal clubs in pharmacy and medical training. This session presents a novel approach to address these areas using interprofessional clinical debates for APPE pharmacy students working with PG3 family medicine residents.

(Moderator) Miranda R. Andrus, Auburn University; (Speaker) Bradley M. Wright, Auburn University; (Speaker) Taylor D. Steuber, Auburn University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the advantages of using interprofessional debates to enhance interprofessional education and literature evaluation skills.
  2. Describe the steps for the development of an interprofessional debate topic and case as well as the barriers to implementation.
  3. Identify specific clinical scenarios that would serve as robust interprofessional debate topics.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-078-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Mini-Session: Pediatric Pharmacy SIG: An Innovative Approach to Pediatric Self-Care Education: Pharmacy Student-Directed Elementary School Health Fair

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pediatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group; Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine Special Interest Group

This program is intended for faculty members of the Pediatric Pharmacy and Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIGs as it will discuss a co-curricular approach to provide pharmacy students an active learning experience to develop and implement a health fair for elementary-school children in pediatric self-care related topics. Participants will consider learning processes of pediatric communication skills by way of case method through immersion to evaluation of ACPE Standards 3 and 4 elements by meta-cognitive reflection assignment.

(Speaker) Kelly L. Matson, The University of Rhode Island; (Speaker) Katherine K. Orr, The University of Rhode Island

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe a co-curricular teaching strategy for pharmacy students to develop and implement a health fair for elementary-school children in pediatric self-care related topics.
  2. Assess evaluation of a teaching strategy through study objectives of CAPE outcomes of health and wellness, education, communication, professionalism and self-awareness.
  3. Assess and identify co-curricular opportunities in pediatric populations for medication-related information within pharmacy schools.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-046-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Accelerated Pharmacy Programs Group

Sheraton: Commonwealth, Third Floor

Faculty and administrators from accelerated pharmacy programs are invited to discuss topics including PCOA, NAPLEX, interprofessional education, research and teaching strategies within accelerated pharmacy programs.

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Assessment SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group

Annual business meeting for the Assessment SIG.

(Chair) Tara L. Jenkins, Touro University California

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Geriatric Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Riverway, Fifth Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group

This business meeting will be conducted for the members of the Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group. Organization plans and ideas for the SIG will be discussed.

(Speaker) Teresa M. DeLellis, Manchester University; (Speaker) Rebecca Mahan, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center; (Speaker) Elizabeth K. Pogge, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Kelechi C. Unegbu-Ogbonna, Virginia Commonwealth University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Graduate Education SIG: Annual Business Meeting & Networking Event

Sheraton: The Fens, Fifth Floor

Intended Audience: Graduate Education Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section; Chemistry Section

This session will serve as the annual business meeting and networking event for the Graduate Education SIG. The purpose of this year’s business session will be to 1) review the SIG’s rolling two-year objectives; 2) discuss future programming topics; and 3) provide networking among members. The discussion will explore the challenges of funding graduate education, identify areas of interest and needs of our SIG membership.

(Chair) Angela K. Birnbaum, University of Minnesota; (Moderator) Hai-An Zheng, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

History of Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Public Garden, Fifth Floor

Intended Audience: History of Pharmacy Special Interest Group

This business meeting will be conducted for the members of the History of Pharmacy SIG. Organizational plans and ideas for the SIG will be discussed, as well as planning for the SIG's standing and ad hoc committees' activities.

(Chair) Ettie Rosenberg, West Coast University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Leadership Development SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Annual business meeting for the Leadership Development SIG.

(Chair) Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, University of Missouri–Kansas City

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Professional Resources Committee Meeting

Sheraton: Hampton, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section

This is the business meeting for the Professional Resources Committee of the Library and Information Science section. This committee is responsible for the AACP Basic Resources for Pharmacy Education and Core List of Journals for Pharmacy Education.

(Speaker) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) Sharon Giovenale, University of Connecticut

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Minority Faculty SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Gardner, Third Floor

Intended Audience: Minority Faculty Special Interest Group

Annual business meeting for the Minority Faculty SIG.

(Chair) Ashley M. Taylor, Xavier University of Louisiana

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Pharmacogenomics SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group

Annual business meeting for the Pharmacogenomics SIG.

(Chair) Christina L. Aquilante, University of Colorado

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

AACP President's Reception

Sheraton: Republic Ballroom, Second Floor

By Invitation Only

Passing the gavel, honoring AACP President Dr. Steven A. Scott and AACP President-elect Dr. David D. Allen for their exceptional dedication to the pharmacy academy.

7:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

University of Maryland Reception

Sheraton: Independence East, Second Floor

By Invitation Only

Celebration for Dean, Dr. Natalie Eddington and her services to AACP.

Tuesday

Tuesday, July 24

All Day

Meet the Editor

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education? Do you have a question about AJPE? Stop by and meet the editor, associate editors and editorial staff of AJPE. We'll be here during breakfast and beverage break times!

(Editor) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University

6:30 a.m.–7:30 a.m.

High Energy Circuit Workout

Sheraton: Republic Ballroom, Second Floor

Jump start your Tuesday morning and join your colleagues in a high energy circuit workout. This aerobic workout puts the emphasis as much on having fun as breaking a sweat. All levels welcome. Sponsored by Pearson.

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Two Locations: Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level; and Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Global Pharmacy Education SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Public Garden, Fifth Floor

Intended Audience: Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group

This meeting will discuss the business needs and strategic direction of the Global Pharmacy Education SIG, as well as introduce the newly elected officers.

(Chair) Toyin S. Tofade, Howard University; (Speaker) Jeanine P. Abrons, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Shaun E. Gleason, University of Colorado; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Health Care Ethics SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Hampton, Third Floor

Intended Audience: Health Care Ethics Special Interest Group

This meeting will review Health Care SIG activities over the last year, plan for the coming year and conduct any other business of the SIG. We hope you will attend this SIG meeting and help us move our SIG forward!

(Chair) James Ruble, The University of Utah

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Commonwealth, Third Floor

Intended Audience: Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

This business meeting will discuss important orders of business for the SIG and include introduction of new officers. Members will be able to sign up for committees during the meeting.

(Chair) Naser Z. Alsharif, Creighton University

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Laboratory Instructors SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

This session will serve as the annual business meeting and networking session for the Laboratory Instructors SIG.

(Speaker) Krista L. Donohoe, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Andrea L. Porter, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Chair) Karen Sando, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Deanna Tran, University of Maryland

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Pediatric Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: The Fens, Fifth Floor

Intended Audience: Pediatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group

This program is the annual business meeting and networking session for the Pediatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group. New officers will be introduced and members will be able to sign up for committees during the meeting.

(Chair) William A. Prescott, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Public Health SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Riverway, Fifth Floor

Intended Audience: Public Health Special Interest Group

Annual business meeting for the Public Health SIG.

(Chair) Jordan R. Covvey, Duquesne University

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription Medicine SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription Medicine Special Interest Group

Annual business meeting for the Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIG.

(Chair) Emily M. Ambizas, St. John's University

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Student Services Personnel SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD

Intended Audience: Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Annual business meeting for the Student Services Personnel SIG.

(Chair) Renee M. DeHart, Samford University

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Substance Abuse Education and Assistance SIG: Business Meeting

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Substance Abuse Education and Assistance SIG

Annual business meeting for the Substance Abuse Education and Assistance SIG.

(Chair) Cynthia P. Koh-Knox, Purdue University

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

COREreadiness Focus Group by invitation only

Sheraton: Gardner, Third Floor

During this interactive session we will be discussing co-curricular support, preceptor support and MTM/patient consulting preparation and specific ways to enhance these initiatives! Contribute your expertise and insight.

7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Please check in and pick up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2018 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Networking Rooms 1, 2 and 3

Sheraton: Beacon D, E & F, Third Floor

Want to catch up with old friends, meet new ones or discuss similar interests? Want to continue the discussion from a fantastic session? Come to the Networking Rooms or schedule time at the AACP Registration and Help Desk.

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Meditation Room

Sheraton: Beacon A, Third Floor

Wellness is a concept and a state of being that everyone must embrace. Make your well-being a priority at Pharmacy Education 2018 by visiting the Meditation Room, where you can meditate, reflect, pray or just be quiet and still. It’s a place free from distractions and the hustle and bustle of our everyday lives.

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Implementing the Pharmacist' Patient Care Process in a Medicinal Chemistry Course

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Chemistry Section

The Pharmacist' Patient Care Process was introduced to establish a thought process and a framework for how pharmacists consistently approach their patient care. Pharmacy programs are being asked to introduce the PPCP at both the didactic and experiential experience level. Emphasis on the didactic level is to implement this thought process in all the sciences. This presentation will describe the implementation of the PPCP in a medicinal chemistry course as a collaborative effort with a clinical faculty member.

(Speaker) Naser Z. Alsharif, Creighton University; (Speaker) Michelle A. Poepping-Faulkner, Creighton University

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Administrative Services Section: Quantifying Faculty Workload: How Much is Enough? & Teamwork Makes the Dream Work: Development and Implementation of A School of Pharmacy Diversity and Inclusion Plan

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Advanced / Advanced

Intended Audience: Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Assessment Special Interest Group Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section

The target audience for this session is department chairs, division directors and faculty within colleges of pharmacy. Many are drawn to faculty roles, in part, because of the diversity in responsibilities. This diversity, however, makes it challenging to assess the quantity of an individual faculty member's workload. Though the quantity of work is difficult to determine, doing so is desirable in order to allow fair distribution of responsibilities, allow workload customization, avoid burnout and justify additional resource needs. We developed a workload quantification tool to be used across departments within our school of pharmacy.

This session will discuss how a school of pharmacy three-year diversity and inclusion plan, approved by pharmacy faculty and staff, was developed and is being implemented as a school-wide effort. Diversity efforts can often be isolated and not as effective if all constituents are not involved in implementation. Specific strategies developed to improve diversity and create an inclusive environment will be discussed and described. Participants will create a draft diversity plan for their institutions.

(Speaker) Amie D. Brooks, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Lakesha M. Butler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Patrick M. Finnegan, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Janice R. Frueh, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe potential benefits of accurately quantifying faculty workload.
  2. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of different methods of data collection and input when quantifying faculty workload.
  3. Identify opportunities for implementation of faculty workload quantification within your institution.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss how school of pharmacy diversity and inclusion plan was developed.
  2. Discuss specific goals developed to create an inclusive pharmacy environment.
  3. Describe strategies being implemented to meet diversity plan goals.
  4. Develop a draft diversity plan for one’s own pharmacy institution.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-080-L04-P, 0.75 Contact Hour)

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-081-L04-P, 0.75 Contact Hour)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Experiential Education Section: Ready or Not? Assessment of Student Readiness to Enter Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE)

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section

Standards 2016 require programs to ensure that students are prepared with knowledge, skills, and attitudes to enter APPEs and to provide evidence of student achievement of these competencies. There is no agreed upon consensus or best practice regarding the design and assessment of APPE-readiness. Presenters from three programs will offer examples of assessment strategies employed to measure APPE-readiness of students. Audience will be engaged in the discussion of what it means to be APPE-ready.

(Moderator) Margarita V. DiVall, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Ashok E. Philip, Union University; (Speaker) Roopali Sharma, Touro College of Pharmacy—New York; (Speaker) Kali VanLangen, Ferris State University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss how schools/colleges ensure student readiness to enter Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs).
  2. Describe successful examples and lessons-learned for designing, implementing and assessing APPE -readiness.
  3. Identify challenges and brainstorm solutions to assessing APPE-readiness.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-082-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.- 9:30 a.m.

Geriatric Pharmacy SIG: Educational Scholarship: Strategies for Enhancing Publication Productivity

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

High volume, high impact academic publication involves: 1) producing quality text, 2) managing writing projects and 3) employing various writing formats to develop “lines of inquiry.” Using writing productivity literature and personal experience, strategies for building writing volume and strong writing practices will be presented, with examples from aging research and Scholarships Committee work. To help ensure that scholarly initiatives come to fruition, a process for managing the publication pipeline and a continuum of writing formats, matched with phases of inquiry, will be provided.

(Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Jeannie Lee, University of Arizona.

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Global Pharmacy Education SIG: Integrating Global Health Into the Pharm.D. Curriculum

Hynes Convention Center: Room 310, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Public Health Special Interest Group

Pharmacists have the opportunity to play a significant role within global health. As graduates continue to explore non-traditional career pathways and opportunities, it is important to understand how global health can best be integrated within the pharmacy curriculum, and prepare our graduates to be leaders in this field. This session targets faculty who seek to integrate global health principles and approaches within both the didactic and experiential components of the curriculum.

(Speaker) Helen D. Berlie, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Paul E. Kilgore, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Karen Kopacek, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Gina M. Prescott, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify relevant guidance documents related to global health and the Pharm.D. curriculum.
  2. Describe key resources and strategies for implementing global health into the Pharm.D. curriculum.
  3. Construct a framework for incorporating global health education at your institution.
  4. Discuss tools to monitor and track outcome-based global health experiences.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-083-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Graduate Education SIG: Getting From My Burning Question to Specific Research Questions: Applying Mixed Methods to Educational Research

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Graduate Education Special Interest Group; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Women Faculty Special Interest Group

Turning scholarly interests into specific, feasible research questions can be challenging given the numerous variables that affect educational outcomes at various levels. This session provides hands-on experience with how to transform a ‘burning question’ into one or more specific research questions that can be addressed with mixed methods designs, including those appropriate for accreditation needs, pilot internally-funded projects, and larger externally-funded projects. Pharmacy faculty participants will leave with a personal plan for pursuing scholarly interests.

(Moderator) Aimee F. Strang, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) Roger A. Edwards, MGH Institute of Health Professions

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe one’s scholarly interest in terms of one or more research questions.
  2. Identify an appropriate mixed methods study design for one research question.
  3. Compare the feasibility of different research questions and mixed methods study designs.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-090-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

PharmCAS R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Sheraton: Fairfax, Third Floor

Taking care of business sometimes requires taking care of yourself in the process. AACP is making it easy with the PharmCAS R&R Lounge—designed to offer attendees a brief but much-needed respite from crowds, noise and other common meeting stresses, while keeping you fresh for the business of learning and networking. Kick up your feet, check your e-mail, charge your phone, tablet or laptop and unwind. There will be four laptop kiosks available on a first-come, first-served basis. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment. With support from our sponsor, PharmCAS, powered by Liaison, the lounge services are complimentary so make time to stop by for a little R&R! AACP would like to thank Liaison for their sponsorship to support the R&R Lounge and the University of Florida for staffing it.

8:00 a.m.-9:30 a.m.

Innovations in Teaching Award

Sheraton: Hampton, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

Recipients of the 2018 Innovations in Teaching Award will present their winning submissions.

(Moderator) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speakers) Heidi N. Eukel, Jeanne E. Frenzel, Dan Cernusca, North Dakota State University, presenting Use of an Escape Room as a Disruptive Instructional Strategy to Enhance Pharmacy Students' Learning about Diabetes; (Speakers) Kathryn J. Smith, University of Florida, presenting Second Year Capstone Assessing the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Drawing Castles in the Sand: Fostering Collegiality and Civility

Hynes Convention Center: Room 311, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Continuing Professional Development Section

Academic culture is described as behavioral norms that are influenced by cooperative relationship of colleagues. Collegiality, an integral component of an organization’s culture, is considered an extra-role behavior that represents individuals’ conduct that is discretionary and often not recognized by the formal reward systems. This session will engage faculty, administrators and staff through content and activities to foster collegiality and civility through collective responsibilities, shared decision-making within governance structures, and academic citizenship.

(Moderator) Seena L. Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Susan M. Stein, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Jenny A. Van Amburgh, Northeastern University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define academic culture, collegiality and civility.
  2. Identify effective approaches to promote collegiality and civility.
  3. Discuss how collegiality and civility should be incorporated into faculty’s professional development and peer review processes.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-084-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Incorporating Co-Curriculars Into Your Program: A Tale of Many Cities

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription Medicine Special Interest Group

This program will describe various avenues institutions have taken to meet the co-curricular requirements outlined within Standards 2016. Faculty will describe their approaches to mapping learning outcomes associated with the co-curriculum. Outlets utilized to offer co-curriculum programming will be shared. Scaffolding ideas for the affective domains through the didactic, experiential and co-curriculum will be assembled. Various assessment approaches and tracking mechanisms will be discussed to ensure that learning outcomes were achieved.

(Speaker) Nancy H. Goodbar, Presbyterian College; (Speaker) Dana P. Hammer, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Cameron C. Lindsey, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Julie M. Sease, Presbyterian College

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Incorporation of the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process Into Pharmacy Skills and Applications Lab

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

This session will review the development and outcome of integrating the PPCP into a pharmacy skills and applications high-stakes practical. Students are assessed on all aspects of the PPCP model. Cases were designed for students to collect patient-specific information by performing a history of present illness, assessing the condition, and determining a patient-specific plan. Students then implement the plan by educating on a medication or device, and discuss appropriate follow-up.

(Speaker) Anisa Fornoff, Drake University; (Speaker) Jamie Pitlick, Drake University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast strategies to incorporate the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process into a pharmacy curriculum.
  2. Discuss strategies to incorporate an assessment of the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process into a pharmacy skills and applications high stakes lab practical.
  3. Discuss example patient cases and grading criteria utilized for high-stakes exams and discuss student outcomes.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-086-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Using Taskstream Student Portfolios to Assess Student and Program Outcomes

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Electronic portfolios are ideal for tracking outcomes of a large number of students and allowing student pharmacists to share artifacts with potential employers. This presentation is intended for schools that are interested in learning more about available portfolio technology to assess student and program curricular and co-curricular outcomes. Development, implementation and assessment of a Taskstream electronic portfolio will be presented, along with lessons learned.

(Speaker) Peter J. Hughes, Samford University; (Speaker) Elizabeth A. Sheaffer, Samford University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. State at least three student outcome areas that could be assessed in your program.
  2. Brainstorm existing curricular and co-curricular activities that relate to those areas.
  3. Identify at least two options for structuring Taskstream electronic portfolios.
  4. Determine the appropriate person(s) and/or committee to manage an electronic student portfolio system.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-087-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Spouse/Guests Hospitality Room

Sheraton: Beacon G, Third Floor

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor; and Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Enhancing a Pharmacotherapy Course With Educational Techniques Based on Cognitive Science to Make Learning “Stick”

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Evidence-based teaching grounded in the cognitive science of learning is emerging as best-practice. Many pharmacy educators are not aware of simple educational techniques to incorporate into lecture-based pharmacotherapy courses. The concepts of spaced retrieval, interleaving and reflection improve student learning through the cognitive science principle that long-lasting learning requires effort to make the learning “stick.” We share our experience implementing and assessing educational techniques grounded in cognitive science that participants can apply at their institution.

(Speaker) Crystal Burkhardt, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define the evidence-based educational concepts grounded in the cognitive science of learning.
  2. Describe a variety simple educational techniques that apply the cognitive science of learning.
  3. Compare methods for implementation and assessment of the educational techniques applied to pharmacy education.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-088-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Mini Session: SBIRT to Combat the Opioid Crisis

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Public Health Special Interest Group

The phrases “Opioid Crisis” and “America’s War on Drugs” are common topics of discussion in healthcare. With pharmacists identified as one of the most accessible healthcare providers, the pharmacy profession has an obligation to take a leading role in identifying a solution. This program will describe the use of SBIRT, Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment for substance abuse as an interprofessional activity, identify learning outcomes, discuss evaluation and share logistics.

(Speaker) Brenda S. Bray, Washington State University; (Speaker) Megan L. Willson, Washington State University

10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 3

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Women Faculty Special Interest Group

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app and the Official Meeting Program.

(Moderator) Schwanda K. Flowers, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Curriculum SIG: Electronic Health Record Simulation to Teach the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Presenters from multiple institutions will share their experiences using different Electronic Health Record (EHR) platforms to teach components of the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process (PPCP). PPCP activities include data collection (Collect), assessment of appropriateness of medication orders (Assess), and documentation by using the EHR to write SOAP notes (Plan). Speakers will discuss specific successes and challenges encountered creating these activities. Participants will have the opportunity to share their experiences.

(Moderator) Joel Marrs, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Lisa Charneski, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Olga Hilas, St. John's University; (Speaker) James Trovato, University of Maryland

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the role of EHR technology in the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process.
  2. Identify elements of the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process that can be simulated in the curriculum.
  3. Discuss the successes and challenges of using simulation early in the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-089-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Documenting and Rewarding Student Accomplishment

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Introductory/Advanced

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section Assessment Special Interest Group; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

This session showcases tools used to creatively document and reward student accomplishment at two institutions. Discussion includes a drug information question assignment that was positively impacted in terms of writing quality and content by the addition of a dual peer review component utilizing Examsoft® rubrics. A portion of the session will allow attendees the opportunity to discuss and share similar experiences or ideas for improving written activities in the pharmacy curriculum. Digital badges are electronic icons to showcase student accomplishments that can be shared on social or professional media platforms. Badges also can be a tool to document students' curricular and co-curricular outcomes and a mechanism for providing evidence in meeting ACPE standards. Participants will begin the process of developing their own digital badge.

(Speaker) Bryan Donald, The University of Louisiana at Monroe; (Speaker) Kimberly S. Plake, Purdue University; (Speaker) Amy Heck Sheehan, Purdue University; (Speaker) Gregory W. Smith, The University of Louisiana at Monroe

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the use of a dual peer review process to improve students’ written response to a drug information question.
  2. Describe the use of Examsoft® rubrics for peer reviews of a written assignment.
  3. Discuss ideas for improving quality and content of written assignments in pharmacy education.
  4. Explain how the implementation of digital badges can be used to show student achievement of learning outcomes.
  5. Discuss the potential role of digital badges within a college/school of pharmacy.
  6. Develop a plan to implement a digital badge.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-091-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Special Session: Student Hotspotting—A Community-Based Learning Lab With Medically and Socially Complex Patient Populations

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Public Health Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Student Hotspotting (SH) is a six-month learning collaborative engaging interprofessional student teams nationwide. SH focuses on patient-centered, evidence-based principles and engages “super-utilizers,” patients with complex medical and social needs accounting for excessive, avoidable healthcare costs. This session showcases how student pharmacists and pharmacy colleges/schools have been engaged with SH and how SH can offer real-life interprofessional learning in social determinants of health and value-based care, concepts that are difficult to teach in didactic pharmacy curricula.

(Speaker) Janice R. Frueh, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Amber King, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Michael J. Negrete; (Speaker) Kyle M. Turner, The University of Utah

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the student hotspotting program and its role in value-added education.
  2. Discuss how student hotspotting aligns with ACPE standards/CAPE outcomes as an interprofessional, team-based educational experience in value-based healthcare.
  3. Evaluate the programmatic design (i.e., faculty, student, community, patient engagement) and outcomes assessment of student hotspotting programs.
  4. Envision how student hotspotting aligns with AACP’s Strategic Priorities 1 and 3 and consider ways to spread the experience to more current and future pharmacy students.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-085-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Special Session: Engaging Learners Through Escape Rooms and Serious Gaming Pedagogies

Hynes Convention Center: Room 311, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Graduate Education Special Interest Group

This session is appropriate for all pharmacy educators and will introduce the design, assessment, and use of escape rooms to increase student engagement and learning. Pedagogical principles will be discussed and research results from multiple escape room learning activities will be shared. Attendees will participate in an escape room learning activity to better comprehend the design concept. Panelists will also address questions regarding the design, implementation, and assessment of escape rooms in pharmacy education.

(Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Heidi Eukel, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Jeanne E. Frenzel, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Clark Kebodeaux, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Julie H. Oestreich, The University of Findlay; (Speaker) Vincent Venditto, University of Kentucky

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe best practices for escape room learning design.
  2. Describe current research in using escape rooms for pharmacy education
  3. Formulate ideas for how escape rooms for learning can be applied effectively in pharmacy education.
  4. Appraise the associated benefits and limitations from a learner’s perspective by participating in an educational escape room.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-092-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Special Session: Hurricane Preparedness and Contingency Planning: Be Ready Today for What May Happen Tomorrow

Hynes Convention Center: Room 310, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Administrative and Finance Officers Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section; Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

In 2017, we witnessed a record number of major hurricanes making landfall in the U.S. and its territories causing massive destruction and affecting millions of people. This panel of administrative leaders & CEO Deans will speak either about direct experiences with a major storm or with aiding colleagues in the recovery effort. Pearls of wisdom will be shared based on experiences and pitfalls to avoid specifically addressing emergency preparedness. This will be an interactive session.

(Moderator) Indra K. Reddy, Texas A&M University; (Speaker) Kathleen B. Kennedy, Xavier University of Louisiana; (Speaker) Wanda T. Maldonado, University of Puerto Rico; (Speaker) Shirlette G. Milton, Texas Southern University; (Speaker) Jill A. Morgan, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Heather MW Petrelli, University of South Florida

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Understand comprehensive issues involved with disaster preparedness and recovery.
  2. Describe best practices and challenges of dealing with natural disasters.
  3. Discuss proactive strategies (including communication and coordination) strategies for disaster recovery.
  4. Create helpful and practical strategies for disaster recovery to take back to home institutions.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-093-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Special Session: Suit Up: Power Skills for Successful Research Careers

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Graduate Education Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Leadership Development Special Interest Group

“Soft skills” are soft no longer; when it comes to leading research endeavors in academic or industry settings, the most successful researchers are those who can harness their ability to mentor, advocate, manage and adapt to enhance their scientific skills. This session for graduate program faculty, administrators and trainees will showcase the universal nature of “power skills” across job sectors and explore how colleges of pharmacy can incorporate these skills into their research training programs.

(Moderator) Kirsten F. Block, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Moderator) Nicholas E. Hagemeier, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Rick Bertz, Bristol-Myers Squibb; (Speaker) Stephanie F. Gardner, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Daniel A. Ollendorf, Institute for Clinical and Economic Review; (Speaker) Samuel M. Poloyac, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Daniel R. Touchette, University of Illinois at Chicago

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the graduate education competency domains developed by the AACP Research and Graduate Affairs Committee.
  2. Explain the extent to which graduate education competency domains are sought after by employers of graduates.
  3. Describe identified barriers and facilitators to graduate programs integrating competency domains in to graduate education.
  4. Identify institutional resources that could be used to foster competence in graduate education domains.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-094-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Women Faculty SIG: Nontraditional Work Arrangements: A Road Less Traveled in Pharmacy Academia

Hynes Convention Center: Room 309, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Women Faculty Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Data from a recently completed national survey examined existing and desired flexible work arrangements in pharmacy academia will be summarized in this session. Experiences from two successful examples of nontraditional arrangements (part-time and job share) at two different colleges of pharmacy will be highlighted. Barriers to the pursuit of nontraditional work schedules will be discussed. A panel representing multiple perspectives will be featured. The target audience includes faculty and administrators from colleges of pharmacy.

(Speaker) Shannon W. Finks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Brooke L. Griffin, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Ana C. Quiñones-Boex, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Kelly C. Rogers, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Kathleen M. Vest, Midwestern University/Downers Grove;  (Speaker) Susan R. Winkler, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Review data gathered from a national survey intended to characterize the demographics of non-traditional academic appointments in academia, determine the reasons related to pursuing part-time academic appointments, and faculty perceptions of productivity related to part time contributions to scholarship, teaching, and scholarship.
  2. Discuss potential barriers, solutions, and strategies for planning and implementing non-traditional work arrangements to help retain faculty.
  3. Discuss the potential benefits of non-traditional appointments in pharmacy academia.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-095-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Mini Session: PCARxD: A Focused Problem-Solving Model for Instruction in Integrated Pharmacotherapy Case Topics

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Biological Sciences Section; Experiential Education Section

Combining foundational knowledge with critical thinking and collaborative processing skills are essential components of contemporary pharmacy education per CAPE/ACPE standards. “PCARxD” is a novel, workflow-oriented framework that aligns with the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process; it can be used to efficiently and systematically teach problem-solving steps in knowledge-focused courses like pharmacotherapy. This mini-session shares the PCARxD model and implementation experience in a team-taught, integrated course. Faculty at various levels will benefit from the description and discussion.

(Speaker) Brianne L. Porter, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Maria C. Pruchnicki, The Ohio State University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the role of problem solving/decision making in contemporary pharmacy education, and connections to the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process.
  2. List steps in problem solving, with examples of how the steps are taught at The Ohio State University using a novel "PCARxD" method.
  3. Connect the steps in the PCARxD problem-solving method to critical thinking development in pharmacy students, and describe program outcomes to-date.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-096-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Substance Abuse Education and Assistance SIG: An Enhanced Naloxone Simulation Program: Lessons Learned

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Several states have instituted legislation permitting pharmacists to dispense naloxone without a prescription. Commonly, pharmacists must complete a mandated training in order to participate in a state sponsored naloxone program. This presentation will detail the development of an enhanced training program as compared to current training standards. All pharmacists focused on substance abuse education are encouraged to attend.

(Moderator) Cynthia P. Koh-Knox, Purdue University; (Speaker) Thomas S. Franko, Wilkes University

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning Editorial Board Meeting

Hynes Convention Center, Room 305, Third Level

By Invitation Only

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

PCAT Advisory Committee Meeting

Sheraton: The Fens, Fifth Floor

Closed committee meeting.

(Chair) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University

11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE) Editorial Board Luncheon

Sheraton: Public Garden, Fifth Floor

By Invitation Only

(Moderator) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Open Hearing of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom, Second Floor

This session provides all meeting attendees the opportunity to hear the business coming before the Final Session of the House of Delegates. All attendees may comment on proposed policies, resolutions and other business.

(Chair) Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker of the House) Michael L. Manolakis, Wingate University

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Pharmacy Learners’ Perceptions of Their Racial Implicit Bias

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group

This program will explore student pharmacists’ perceptions of their racial implicit/unconscious bias. In the past decade, it has become clearer that biases are not always explicitly held, but are often hidden and unknown. Implicit bias, although outside of conscious awareness, can affect an individual’s behavior. In a pharmacy practice course, student pharmacists were required to complete the Harvard Race Implicit Association Test and reflect on their result. Retrospectively, following IRB approval, student pharmacists' reflections were subjected to thematic analysis.

(Speaker) Nicole D. Avant, University of Cincinnati

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze pharmacy students’ perceptions about their own implicit racial biases.
  2. Deepen their capacity to identify personal bias and stereotypes – and ways to respond more effectively.
  3. Describe a tool that can be used to promote self-awareness regarding biases in pharmacy.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-097-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Preparing Health Professions Students for Community Public Health Emergencies: An Interprofessional Education Simulation

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Continuing Professional Development Section; Public Health Special Interest Group; Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

During a community outbreak of giardia, pharmacy and nursing students worked in teams to respond to this public health emergency. In this simulation with standardized patients, health professional students screened, assessed, and treated indigent adults affected by the outbreak. The analysis and results of pre- and post-surveys on student roles and responsibilities will be presented and launch an interactive discussion of interprofessional relationships in team patient care.

(Moderator) Trina J. von Waldner, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Catherine A. White, The University of Georgia

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the role of each health professions student in a public health emergency simulation.
  2. List three skills that health professions students need to function effectively in an interprofessional team.
  3. Identify strategies to incorporate IPE into the curriculum using public health simulations.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-098-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Smartphones, Social Media, and Their Effects on Student Mental Health

Sheraton: Commonwealth, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group; Library and Information Science Section; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Digital technology experts are suggesting that smartphones and social media are contributing to the current student mental health crisis (as indicated by increased reports of anxiety, stress, depression, etc.). This session will summarize research of why this is occurring and engage faculty, staff, and students in discussion of the issues. The goals of this session are to raise awareness of the problem, promote research in the area, and ignite collaborative thought toward addressing the issues.

(Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Biological Sciences Section: Integration of Pharmacogenomics in the Classroom

Sheraton: Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

Intended Audience: Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section; Pharmaceutics Section

In the age of genomic medicine, pharmacists are positioned to play a vital role in the implementation of pharmacogenomics across practice settings. This program will give a step-by-step approach to educators on how to incorporate the examples of pharmacogenomics into the pharmacy curriculum. Participants will be guided through some of the foundations of genomic medicine and then be engaged with some examples of classroom genetic activities that involve current medications.

(Speaker) Christopher L. Farrell, Presbyterian College; (Speaker) David F. Kisor, Manchester University

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Pharmaceutics Section: Pharmaceutical Considerations of Marijuana Dosage Forms

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmaceutics Section; Chemistry Section; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

One of the most difficult issues in the legal marijuana industry is the regulation of marijuana edibles and products. When formulating any drug dosage form, the primary concerns are therapeutic and scientific. For example, in drug compounding, there is a thin line between the scientific and marketing components of drug compounding, in pharmaceuticals and in marijuana, that also tend to fall in the domain of ethics. For example, is it acceptable to create a marijuana product for adults that is appealing to children? In this session the growth in the availability of marijuana products and edibles will be discussed and the potential harm and ethical issues related to these products will be highlighted. The intent is to reach some consensus on how these issues and developments can be incorporated into pharmacy curriculums.

(Moderator) Melgardt M. de Villiers, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Matthew Metcalf, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Nicole R. Winston, Marshall University

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: LOL for Student Engagement: Using Humor and Theatrics to Engage Students

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Humor and theatrical components can be effective tools to engage students both within and outside of classrooms. They can bring positivity and enthusiasm while creating an enjoyable, memorable and non-punitive space, open to critical inquiry. Speakers will use comedy and theatrics to offer techniques to use humor, storytelling and backstage secrets from performers to prepare faculty for the spotlight on the classroom stage.

(Moderator) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University; (Speaker) Vibhuti Arya, St John’s University; (Speaker) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Susan S. Vos, The University of Iowa

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss evidence behind using humor and theatrics as an educational strategy.
  2. Identify specific techniques where comedy and play can be used as a tool within the learning process.
  3. Recognize methods to assist faculty in setting the stage and releasing their inner performer.
  4. Use self reflection and guided exercise to integrate humor and theatrics into teaching.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-119-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Student Services Personnel SIG: Co-Curricular Delivery of Career Preparatory Activities to Increase Self-Awareness and Student Success in Securing Employment

Hynes Convention Center: Room 311, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Continuing Professional Development Section

Finding room to discuss career preparatory activities inside of a Pharm.D. curriculum can be difficult. Co-curricular activities, such as career fairs, speaker series, and student organization driven curriculum vitae workshops and mock-interviews help students prepare for life after graduation. Co-curricular career preparatory activities at four pharmacy programs will be discussed. This session will be of particular interest to student services/affairs personnel, social and administrative sciences faculty.

(Speaker) Rocke DeMark, Chapman University; (Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Dustin T. Grant, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Helen C. Park, Roseman University of Health Sciences

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of co-curricular activities in the development of student strategies for securing employment after graduation.
  2. Develop strategies for introducing and incorporating personal and professional development topics focusing on cognitive and affective domains through co-curricular activities.
  3. Identify strategies to begin evaluating the effectiveness of co-curricular activities for career preparation.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-100-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning SIG: Innovative Uses of Technology to Enhance Teaching and Learning

Hynes Convention Center: Room 310, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Library and Information Science Section

Educational technology continues to be an important component in pharmacy education. Panelists will discuss various forms of technology they have integrated into their courses/practice sites with emphasis on implementation and case study presentation. When appropriate, participants will be able to engage in the use of the technology within the session.

(Moderator) Timothy D. Aungst, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Fred Doloresco, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Peter J. Hughes, Samford University; (Speaker) Sukhvir J. Kaur, California Northstate University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate use of an emerging technology and how it can be used in a classroom or clinical setting.
  2. Discuss specific applications of technology to improve courses/practice sites.
  3. Discuss implementation of technology.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-101-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Developing, Implementing, and Assessing Entrustable Professional Activities

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Continuing Professional Development Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

The main purpose of this program is to share examples from several schools/colleges of pharmacy that developed, implemented, and assessed Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) at their institutions. Implementing EPAs is an effective strategy to define core pharmacy practice and therefore inform assessment of students’ competencies in didactic and experiential education. Moreover, EPAs can be utilized for designing Continuous Professional Development programs for the pharmacy professional workforce. Similar to the CAPE Outcomes and ACPE Standards, EPAs are critical measures for establishing students’ levels of knowledge and competency. A group of administrators and faculty will share their action plans for effectively integrating EPAs in various health professional programs nationwide.

(Speaker) Stuart T. Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Jennifer A. Henriksen, Manchester University; (Speaker) Kari L. Franson, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Abby A. Kahaleh, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Amy L. Pittenger, University of Minnesota

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the process of developing EPAs in the pre-professional curricula.
  2. Implement EPAs in experiential education to expand pharmacists’ responsibilities.
  3. Utilize EPAs to inform the design of Continuous Professional Development programs for healthcare professionals.
  4. Develop milestones for assessing students’ preparedness for EPAs.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-102-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process: Creative Ways to Integrate Basic and Social Sciences With Clinical Practice

Hynes Convention Center: Room 309, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Chemistry Section; Assessment Special Interest Group

Students can struggle understanding the value of basic and social (SAS) sciences in clinical care. The Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process (PPCP) can assist students in grasping how the sciences integrate in providing patient-centered care. This program will discuss: 1) innovative PPCP integrations that include basic, SAS, and clinical sciences and 2) how to assess PPCP-related ACPE Standards and learning outcomes. Participants will use a worksheet to actively identify areas for curricular integration and assessment.

(Speaker) Aleda M. Chen, Cedarville University; (Speaker) Mary E. Kiersma, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; (Speaker) Ashley H. Vincent, Purdue University; (Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove;

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize the evidence base for the importance of the Pharmacists Patient Care Process (PPCP), particularly how it impacts patient health behaviors (e. g. , medication adherence) and outcomes.
  2. Identify how the PPCP can be applied to basic, social and administrative sciences, and clinical sciences.
  3. Evaluate methods for assessing student learning outcomes related to the PPCP.
  4. Develop a plan to integrate and assess the PPCP throughout the curriculum.
  5. Discuss solutions to barriers for incorporating and assessing integrated PPCP activities.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-103-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: PCOA Opportunities and Challenges: Two Sides of the Same Coin

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Having completed two cycles of PCOA exam administration, pharmacy programs have identified opportunities and challenges associated with using PCOA results. Following a brief presentation of survey results that characterize how the PCOA exam is used nationally, presenters will share information and engage attendees in the opportunities and challenges associated with use of PCOA data for programmatic and student assessment. Data summarizing the student perspective of the PCOA exam will also be shared.

(Moderator) Margarita V. DiVall, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Kimberly K. Daugherty, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Lisa Lebovitz, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Mary E. Ray, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Burgunda V. Sweet, University of Michigan

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Bylaws and Policy Development Committee Executive Session

Sheraton: Boardroom, Third Floor

Closed committee meeting.

(Chair) Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker of the House) Michael L. Manolakis, Wingate University

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Mindful or Mind Full? Developing a Stress Management Module in the Pharm.D. Curriculum

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

This session is intended for faculty, course coordinators, and curricular leads who are interested in incorporating an elective course or module on Stress Management in their curricula. Speakers will provide an outline for development, implementation and assessment for such a course; and how to tie it with concepts in CAPE Affective Domains and ACPE Standard 4. The session will also involve hands-on ‘training’ including Meditation, Mindfulness and Yoga as tools for stress management.

(Speaker) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Raquel Rodriguez, University of Minnesota

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain required steps in developing a stress management module/elective/course including objectives, implementation and assessments.
  2. Develop assessments related to each step of stress management that increase relevance and accountability for the course.
  3. Recognize scope and boundaries of such a course in cases of mental health issues and counseling.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-104-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Using an Interprofessional Team Approach to Address Substance Use in the Homeless and Underserved

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Special Interest Group

This session describes an innovative interprofessional education initiative involving students and faculty from the nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, and social work programs at one university. They collaborated to offer year-long services at a transitional housing facility for the homeless. After an initial needs assessment in the fall, staff education on substance use disorders was determined to be the focus area. The multidisciplinary group developed and implemented a four-session staff education program.

(Speaker) Gina M. Baugh, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Gretchen M. Garofoli, West Virginia University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Outline an innovative, successful IPE practice experience.
  2. Describe best practices for collaborating with faculty and students from various programs within an academic health sciences center.
  3. Outline the advantages of utilizing an interprofessional team to provide education on substance use disorders.
  4. Discuss ways to address unmet community needs through multidisciplinary collaborations.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-105-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Transgender Education in Pharmacy Curriculum: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls

Sheraton: Commonwealth, Third Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Despite the fact that members of the transgender population may require cross-sex hormone therapy, pharmacists and students might be hesitant to make clinical recommendations and counsel patients. This session will describe the incorporation of transgender-focused material into the pharmacy curriculum at a college of pharmacy. It will also provide tips for helping learners and educators become more comfortable in caring for transgender patients.

(Speaker) Jared L. Ostroff, Western New England University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the need for increased education around transgender care in pharmacy practice.
  2. Describe the steps to take when developing content material and introducing the topic to students.
  3. Explain the different methods used in class and in clinical practice to ensure student and clinician comfort in making recommendations and providing counseling to transgender patients.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-106-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Beverage Break

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

3:30 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Tuesday General Session: The Opioid Crisis: Made in America...Fade in America?

Sheraton: Grand & Independence Ballroom, Second Floor

In the Tuesday General Session, Dr. Bertha Madras will describe the root causes of the opioid epidemic, including the role of private and government entities that failed to protect the public. Strategies to reverse the root causes, including those that can be addressed by government funding, government regulations and the criminal justice system alone cannot reverse the tide. As healthcare systems become increasingly engaged, the potential of pharmacists to make a positive difference is significant.

This session also recognizes the recipients of the Lawrence C. Weaver Transformative Community Service Award, the Rufus A. Lyman Award, the USPHS and IPEC Public Health Excellence in Interprofessional Education Collaboration Award and the inaugural Student Poster Competition.

(President) Steven A. Scott, Pharm.D., Purdue University; (Speaker) Bertha Madras, Harvard Medical School

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss current statistics on opioid use disorder, death rates, and drugs associated with deaths.
  2. List at least 10 root causes of the current opioid crisis and how they can be reverse-engineered.
  3. Describe risk factors for opioid use disorder and opioid misuse.
  4. Explain the responsibilities and responses of pharmacies and pharmacy students to the opioid crisis: education on proper prescribing and legitimate prescribing practices, educating patients, PDMP, elimination of penalties for denying illegitimate prescriptions, take-back pills, others.
  5. Describe new research initiatives such as launch of the NIH HEAL.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-031-L04-P, 1.25 Contact Hour)

5:15 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Step Back in Time: Colonial Boston Closing Reception

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom & Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

In 1630, Puritan colonists from England founded Boston and helped it become the way it is today. The American Revolution erupted in Boston, as the British retaliated harshly for the Boston Tea Party and the patriots fought back. Enjoy with Boston-area influenced hors d'ouvres and beverages, say farewell to your friends and colleagues, and meet the patriots of the American Revolution.

 

7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

APhA Dessert Reception

Sheraton: Republic Ballroom, Second Floor

By Invitation Only

Wednesday

Wednesday, July 25

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Two Locations: Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level; and Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Sign-In

Hynes Convention Center: Boylston Hallway, Third Level

All delegates must sign in for the Final Session of the House of Delegates so the Credentials Committee can determine the quorum for the conduct of business.

(Speaker) Daniel A. Brazeau, University of New England; (Speaker) Evan T. Robinson, Western New England University

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Sheraton: Grand Ballroom Prefunction, Second Floor

Please check in and pick up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2018 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Assuring Quality and Recognizing Success Through an Annual Preceptor Review Process

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Assessment Special Interest Group

ACPE standards recognize the role of preceptors in experiential education and require programs to apply quality criteria for preceptor performance and evaluation. The 2016 AACP PAC Report ‘Priming the Preceptor Pipeline’ further underscores the value of volunteer preceptors and recommends that programs develop new ways to recognize preceptors. In this program we will describe the development of a preceptor review process and a Preceptor Performance Review Dashboard to identify preceptors for quality assurance and recognition.

(Speaker) Jennifer Chang, University of Washington; (Speaker) Curtis G. Jefferson, University of Washington

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Tackling HIV Through IPE: An Interprofessional Testing Training Event

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Public Health Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Washington, D.C., leads the nation in HIV incidence. In response, D.C.’s government and partners have instituted measures to enhance prevention, including expanding point-of-care testing (PoCT) performed by practitioners, such as pharmacists. Howard University College of Pharmacy partnered with the D.C. Department of Health and the Mid-Atlantic AIDS Education Training Center to increase student capacity to combat HIV by hosting a testing training event aimed at encouraging interdisciplinary approaches to prevention. Session participants will explore strategies to enhance interdisciplinary opportunities for pharmacy students, while also using innovative ideas, such as PoCT, to address public health issues.

(Speaker) Monika N. Daftary, Howard University; (Speaker) Imbi Drame, Howard University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Articulate methods by which pharmacy faculty can lead and structure an interprofessional event that involves point-of-care testing (PoCT).
  2. Identify ways in which pharmacy programs can leverage both government and community partnerships to enhance student exposure and learning related to interprofessional education.
  3. Identify and develop innovative strategies to assist pharmacy students with addressing public health issues in a practical and team-based manner.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-107-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence SIG: Cultural Competency in the Pharmacy Trenches:  What Does It Look Like?

Hynes Convention Center: Room 309, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Minority Faculty Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

More recently, much is written and said about the importance of cultural competence in pharmacy education and practice.  This session will provide practical examples from the trenches on how cultural competence in different settings is critical for education of our pharmacy students, for our pharmacy practitioners and for optimizing patient care of diverse patient populations in in ambulatory care and other settings.

(Speaker) Naser Z. Alsharif, Creighton University; (Speaker) Laura K. Klug, Creighton University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify practical strategies to incorporate cultural competence in the curriculum.
  2. Describe practical aspects of cultural competence in an ambulatory care setting.
  3. Describe practical aspects of cultural competence in a hospital setting.
  4. Discuss practical aspects of cultural competence in practice in general.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-108-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Assessing Affective Competencies: Can We Agree On What It Means To Be Practice-Ready?

Sheraton: Constitution Ballroom, Second Floor

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section

Canadian and U.S. programs are guided by similar educational outcomes to prepare their students for practice. Presenters from both countries will engage faculty and administrators in recognizing opportunities, challenges, and methodologies for assessing affective competencies across the entire curriculum. After review of best practices for instrument validation, participants will begin consensus building in determining practice-ready criteria for affective domain competencies. Those interested will be invited to continue the work beyond the Annual Meeting.

(Speaker) M. Kenneth Cor, University of Alberta; (Speaker) Margarita V. DiVall, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Gilles Leclerc, University of Montreal

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: CreACTIVITY: Re-Engaging Learners through Creative Use of Games and Alternative Learning Strategies

Hynes Convention Center: Room 302, Third Level

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Experiential Education Section"

Faculty often find themselves in a Groundhog Day scenario, walking through the same routine day in and day out with their learners. This session is designed to energize faculty to step outside traditional confines of teaching. Educational games, debates, and e-learning to enhance topic understanding will be explored. Faculty from four separate universities will share how these tools took their teaching experiences stagnant to engaging. Additionally, scholarship opportunities with alternative learning strategies will be discussed.

(Speaker) Alex N. Isaacs, Purdue University; (Speaker) Eliza Dy-Boarman, Drake University; (Speaker) Sarah A. Nisly, Wingate University; (Speaker) Taylor D. Steuber, Auburn University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe various alternative learning strategies for use in a pharmacy curriculum.
  2. Create a framework for use of an alternative learning strategy in course delivery.
  3. Design an assessment strategy for measuring impact of an alternative learning strategy.
  4. Identify key stakeholders and develop a plan to implement alternative learning strategies within a pharmacy curriculum.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-109-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Drug Screening Our Pharmacy Students—A National Overview and Tips for Implementation

Hynes Convention Center: Room 312, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section

This multi-school perspective reviews national survey results exploring drug screening/testing policies and procedures in Pharm.D. programs, with a focus on issues and concerns. The researchers examined the frequency of drug-related incidents and types of substances used by pharmacy students. Discussion by schools having successful programs and those hoping to problem-solve concerns will be encouraged. The target audience includes pharmacy program administrators, faculty, and staff interested in the prevention or detection of substance abuse by students.

(Speaker) Patricia L. Darbishire, Purdue University; (Speaker) Trish Devine, Butler University; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, California Health Sciences University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe healthcare students’ risk for substance abuse.
  2. Debate differing perspectives related to drug screening students.
  3. Discuss drug screening and testing basics.
  4. Highlight research findings on drug screen policies and procedures.
  5. Review drug screen policies regarding marijuana.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-110-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Evidence-Based Solutions for Opioid Users That Reduce Mortality and Morbidity

Hynes Convention Center: Rooms 304 & 306, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Special Interest Group; Public Health Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

This session will discuss the evidence supporting harm reduction solutions for people who inject opioids to reduce overdose deaths, infectious disease transmission (Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, HIV) and skin and soft tissue infections. Each speaker will discuss their interprofessional partnerships to initiate, sustain and expand pharmacists' roles providing these solutions. Presenters will also discuss emerging pharmacist roles not only for maintaining patients on current opioid agonist therapies, but also for novel therapies including long-acting injectable therapies.

(Moderator) Leslie Ochs, University of New England; (Speaker) Jeffrey P. Bratberg, The University of Rhode Island; (Speaker) Lucas G. Hill, The University of Texas at Austin;  (Speaker) Tran A. Tran, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Daniel J. Ventricelli, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Mary Wheeler, Healthy Streets Outreach Program, Health Innovations, Inc.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the current opioid epidemic through the prism of problems with supply-side focused solutions contrasting with the mortality and morbidity benefits of demand-focused, de-stigmatizing, comprehensive solutions.
  2. Compare and contrast the evidence supporting different demand solutions for injection opioid users, extrapolating to current and future roles for pharmacists, student pharmacists, and pharmacy faculty.
  3. Develop a timeline to prioritize demand solutions in interprofessional teaching, scholarship, and service to pharmacy students, staff, faculty, and administrators.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-111-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Navigating the Storm: Coaching and Assessing Teamwork Skills

Hynes Convention Center: Room 311, Third Level

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Faculty often question why some teams are highly effective while others become dysfunctional, and if that does occur, how and when team dysfunction should be addressed. This session explores team development stages and the components that influence team functioning. Participants will apply methods to enhance student team performance, including team contracts, team assessment and debriefing and team training to resolve conflicts. CAPE, ACPE, IPE and the flipped classroom model guide faculty in developing teamwork skills.

(Speaker) Michelle Z. Farland, University of Florida; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Will Ofstad, California Health Sciences University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify characteristics of high and low performing teams.
  2. Analyze systems and strategies for facilitating team growth.
  3. Apply strategies to empower teams to self-manage performance.

Application-based (0581-0000-18-112-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: “I Feel Supported, But…”: Exploring the Experiences of and Strategies to Support URM Pharm.D. Students

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom AB, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Minority Faculty Special Interest Group; Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Geared toward school administrators, faculty, and staff interested in creating intentional, research-based academic and social supports for underrepresented racial minority students, this session is designed to share strategies to support the experiences of URM students in Pharm.D. programs. Using data from an extensive qualitative study, session facilitators will discuss the academic and social experiences of URM students, as well as the school-level supports students suggest would improve their sense of belonging and academic performance.

(Speaker) Danielle J. Allen; (Speaker) Antonio A. Bush, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: The "Building Blocks" for Teaching Infectious Diseases: Incorporating Tactile Learning Into the Classroom

Sheraton: Back Bay Ballroom CD, Second Floor

Introductory

Intended Audience: Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Understanding the spectrum of activity of antimicrobials is integral to managing infectious diseases. Mastery of the spectrum of activity of antimicrobials can be challenging, with route memorization often utilized as the primary means for learning. Tactile learning strategies are underutilized in pharmacy education, but may increase retention of complex materials. This session will describe the incorporation of building blocks into the classroom, with examples of in-class active learning, successes and challenges, and preliminary data from implementation.

(Speaker) Jaime A. Foushee, Presbyterian College; (Speaker) Amber B. Giles, Presbyterian College

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe challenges with current approaches to teaching infectious diseases concepts to pharmacy students.
  2. Identify opportunities to integrate tactile learning activities into teaching methods.
  3. Practice building models of antimicrobial agents as a means to reinforce spectrum of activity and appropriate antimicrobial use.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-18-113-L04-P, 0.50 Contact Hour)

9:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Session

Hynes Convention Center: Ballroom AB, Third Level

The final business of the 2018 House of Delegates will occur at this session. Delegates will be seated only if they signed in between 7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m. on Wednesday morning.

(Speaker of the House) Michael L. Manolakis, Wingate University; (Chair) Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy