Virtual Pharmacy Education 2021 - Programming

decorative

Please note: All times listed below are in Eastern Daylight Time.

Teachers Seminar

Learning for All! Applying the Learning Sciences to Improve Educational Outcomes

Fee: $100

The 2021 Teachers Seminar is split over two half-days and will help attendees personalize the application of the learning sciences like elaboration, interleaving and motivation to their unique teaching needs. The seminar will model these teaching practices and provide a scaffolded approach to applying the evidence to improve student and/or trainee learning. Participants will leave the workshop with a plan to design or redesign a lesson in their teaching area.

July 12–13

Monday, July 12

12:30 p.m.–1:15 p.m.

Introduction and Prework Review

During this session, the facilitator will review the pre-workshop material and provide an overview of the day.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain key concepts of how students learn.
  2. Describe the goals for the Teachers Seminar.
  3. Relate the format of Teachers Seminar to evidence of best practice.

(0581-0000-21-108-L04-P 0.75 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Adam Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

We Do: Designing a Lesson for a Common Educational Program

During this session, facilitators will lead participants through several exercises using the design thinking framework to create and revise lesson plans around a common teaching problem in small group breakouts divided according to teaching area.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Create a lesson plan for a common educational problem using design thinking strategies.
  2. Revise a lesson based on feedback obtained during the design thinking process.
  3. Apply the evidence of the learning sciences to design a course or less for a common educational problem.
  4. Compare and contrast the variety of ideas to accomplish the same educational goal.

(0581-0000-21-109-L04-P 2.25 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Michael Wolcott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy/Adams School of Dentistry; (Speaker) Christopher Johnson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Amy Pick, University of Nebraska Medical Center

1:55 p.m.–2:10 p.m.

Screen Break

3:50 p.m.–4:20 p.m.

You Do: Creating a Lesson for Material You Teach and Wrap Up

During this session, facilitators will lead participants through design thinking framework to create a lesson plan for your very own material.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Create a lesson plan for your own material using design thinking strategies.
  2. Apply the evidence of learning sciences to design a lesson or course.
  3. Utilize the design thinking process to design your own lesson plan.

(0581-0000-21-110-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Christopher Johnson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Adam Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

4:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Happy Hour/Networking Session

Tuesday, July 13

12:30 p.m.–1:40 p.m.

Introduction and Creating a Lesson—Continued

During this session, facilitators will lead participants through design thinking framework to create a lesson plan for your very own material.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Review the goals for Day 2.
  2. Describe the process of Design Thinking and how it can be applied to designing a course or lesson.
  3. Create a lesson plan for your own material using design thinking strategies.
  4. Describe the options for designing a lesson for your material.
  5. Apply the evidence of learning sciences to design a lesson or course.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-111-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Adam Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Christopher Johnson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Amy Pick, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Speaker) Michael Wolcott, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy/Adams School of Dentistry

1:40 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Roundtable: Problem Solving/Critical Thinking

During the first part of this session, each presenter will describe the rationale for and strategy they use in their setting (general, preclinical, clinical, experiential, assessment) to teach (individual and teams) and assess students’ problem solving and critical thinking skills. They will also explain logistics for implementing each strategy, any challenges they have encountered and how they overcome the challenge(s) if applicable. During the second part, the panel will answer audience questions. The presenters will conclude by offering participants follow-up materials.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Highlight 7 strategies for teaching and assessing general, non-clinical and clinical problem solving and critical thinking skills in the didactic and experiential settings.
  2. Outline the rationale and logistics for implementing the general, non-clinical and clinical problem solving and critical thinking strategies in the didactic and experiential settings.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-112-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Moderator) Andrea Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Moderator) Kathryn Smith, The University of Oklahoma; (Moderator) Jill Augustine, Mercer University; (Moderator) Rahul Nohria, West Coast University; (Moderator) Kajal Bhakta, University of Texas at Austin

1:40 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Roundtable: Active Learning

During this session, the facilitators will first provide a brief overview of key active learning concepts from the perspective of making knowledge, skills, and/or insights tangible to learners through the constructs of deliberate practice with the components of authentic exercises, real-time coaching with feedback, and facilitated reflection. After working through examples as a group, each attendee will have the opportunity to apply the information discussed by completing an active learning exercise.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe fundamental and essential features of active learning to ensure meaningful, authentic learning addressing knowledge, skills, and insights.
  2. Apply the concepts of deliberate practice (authentic practice, impactful constructive/reinforcing feedback, and learner reflection) into active learning experiences.
  3. Create an active learning strategy that provides authentic practice opportunities tailored to the needs of learners in terms of professional knowledge, skill, and/or insight.

(0581-0000-21-113-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Lindsay Davis, Associate Professor, Midwestern University; (Moderator) Maura Jones, Midwestern University

1:40 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Roundtable: Diversity

During this session, the facilitators will discuss how to design lessons and courses to be more inclusive and reflect on inequities and diversity in their learning space.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain how inequities hinder learning.
  2. Describe methods to make the learning environment more equitable.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-114-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Lakesha Butler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Moderator) Otito Iwuchukwu, Farleigh Dickinson University School of Pharmacy; (Moderator) Tyan Thomas, University of the Sciences

1:40 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Roundtable: Elaboration

During this session, the facilitators will discuss strategies on how to get students to elaborate on their learning and why it helps them in long-term retention.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain the concept of elaboration.
  2. Outline the benefits of this strategy.
  3. Draft a learning session using elaboration.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-115-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Kristin Janke, University of Minnesota; (Moderator) Robin Parker, Lipscomb University; (Moderator) Daniel Malcom, Sullivan University

1:40 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Roundtable: Inclusion: Disability

During this session, the facilitators will discuss the broader implications of various disabilities (visible and invisible) in the learning environment and discuss strategies to help all students be successful.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain several common disabilities (visible and invisible) that impact student learning.
  2. Design a learning session that minimizes learning inequities caused by disability.

(0581-0000-21-116-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Robin Zavod, Midwestern University; (Moderator) Susan Vos, The University of Iowa

1:40 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Roundtable: Reflective Learning

During this session, facilitators will discuss practical ways to incorporate the use of reflective practice to assist learners to avoid “illusions of knowing,” assist with creating mental models, and guide them through professional identity formation.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define professional identity formation.
  2. Describe the Dunning-Kruger effect of individuals perception of their knowledge.
  3. Identify reflective practice strategies for implementation in the classroom, co-curricular, or experiential settings.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-117-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Michelle Farland, University of Florida; (Moderator) Stacey Curtis, University of Florida; (Moderator) Eric Gilliam, University of Colorado; (Moderator) Lori Dupree, Mercer University; (Moderator) Carolyn Ford, Wingate University

1:40 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Roundtable: Scaffolding

During this session, facilitators will discuss how scaffolding instructional techniques can be used to move students to a more independent learning process.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify several specific scaffolding strategies that can be utilized both in classroom and experiential learning environments.
  2. Describe the scaffolding strategy that will be most readily adaptable to their own teaching.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-118-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Craig Cox, Texas Tech University; (Moderator) Kathryn Fuller, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Moderator) Allison Schriever, University of Illinois at Chicago

1:40 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Roundtable: Spaced Retrieval and Retrieval Practice

During this session, the facilitators will discuss how to use spacing of practice and testing to maximize retention of information in the classroom or in experiential learning.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain the concept of spacing and retrieval.
  2. Design a learning session utilizing spaced practice and retrieval practice.

(0581-0000-21-119-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Adam Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Moderator) Kashelle Lockman, The University of Iowa

3:25 p.m.–4:05 p.m.

You Do: Revising Your Lesson to Be More Evidence-based

During this session, facilitators will lead participants through several exercises using the design thinking framework to revise lesson plans around your own material in small group breakouts.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Revise a lesson plan using design thinking strategies.
  2. Apply the evidence of the learning sciences into the revised lesson or course.
  3. Develop an action plan moving forward.

(0581-0000-21-120-L04-P 0.75 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Christopher Johnson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Amy Pick, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Speaker) Michael Wolcott, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy/Adams School of Dentistry

4:05 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Debrief & Conclusions

During this session, the facilitator will summarize the day and facilitate next steps to promote further engagement around the topics discussed.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify resources for further learning and follow-up.
  2. Develop a community of support.

(0581-0000-21-121-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Adam Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Pre-Sessions

Monday, July 12

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Joseph T. DiPiro Excellence in Publishing Workshop: Learning from the Greats

Fee: $30

Editors and Lyman Award winners will discuss what they think contributes to an excellent manuscript that gets accepted and published in AJPE. This 90-minute workshop will guide authors on how they can better navigate the writing and peer review process. This workshop will also provide guidance to reviewers, including how they can write high-quality reviews that will be helpful to the editors and authors. Pre-registration recommended. 

(Speaker & Moderator) Gayle Brazeau, Marshall University; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Lauren Schlesselman, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Adam Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma

Tuesday, July 13

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

AFO SIG Business Meeting

Wednesday, July 14

1:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Early Career Faculty Program: Bridging the Divide Between Science and Practice

Fee: Complimentary with Annual Meeting registration.

Effectively bridging science and practice can create opportunities to advance your own professional development and better prepare your students to succeed in a rapidly changing profession. However, many faculty struggle to apply the lessons of their own discipline meaningfully in their teaching. Collaboration with colleagues from across the science-practice divide and integration of teaching and scholarship can be the key to greater joy in your work and impact in your results. Note: This program is intended for early career faculty, and some pre-work will be expected.

(Moderator) Dorothy Farrell, AACP; (Speaker) Susan Mercer, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Dan Berlau, Regis University; (Speaker) Clark Kebodeaux, University of Kentucky

 

Thursday, July 15

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

AFO SIG Business Meeting

Friday, July 16

Noon-1:30 p.m.

Council of Faculties Business Meeting

All members of the Council of Faculties (COF) are invited to receive reports on current and future council priorities.

(Chair) Adam Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Noon-1:30 p.m.

Council of Deans Business Meeting

All members of the Council of Deans (COD) are invited to receive reports of current and future priorities. The transition to the 2021-2022 COD Administrative Board will occur during this session.

(Chair and Speaker) Wanda Maldonado, University of Puerto Rico; (Speaker) Russell Melchert, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Speaker) Renae Chesnut, Drake University; (Speaker) Debra Parker, University of Findlay; (Speaker) W. Thomas Smith, Manchester University

2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

Council of Deans Networking Session: Assistant/Associate Deans

This session will engage Assistant and Associate Deans on topics pertinent to the role and responsibilities.

(Moderator) Jennifer Adams, Idaho State University; (Moderator) Kyle Sousa, Loma Linda University

2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

Council of Deans Networking Session: CEO Deans

This session will engage the CEO Deans on topics pertinent to their role and responsibilities.

(Moderator) Wanda Maldonado, University of Puerto Rico; (Moderator) Renae Chesnut, Drake University

12:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

APhA Pathways Training Session

Fee: Complimentary with Annual Meeting registration.

To make a sound career decision, you need knowledge about two important subjects—the pharmacy profession and yourself. The APhA Career Pathway Evaluation Program for Pharmacy Professionals is not a “quick fix” that will enable you to reach a career decision by the end of the workshop, nor is it a substitute for your own research. However, it can help you identify the pharmacy career option that is appropriate for you by providing information and guidelines you will need to carry out this process. After working through the exercises within this program and participating in a live workshop, you will not only have detailed and useful information about many areas of pharmacy practice, but also will have a clearer understanding of how to choose a career path in pharmacy that is right for you.

(Organizer) Elliott M. Sogol, University of Wyoming School of Pharmacy

General Meeting Programming

Pre-recorded Sessions

Please note: All pre-recorded sessions will be available to watch on-demand, beginning July 19 and ending three months post-conference.

Creation of a Multifaceted Antimicrobial Stewardship Rounds Simulation in an Infectious Disease Elective

Simulation activities within the didactic pharmacy curricula present an opportunity to expose students to hospital practice before starting advanced practice pharmacy experiences (APPEs). This session describes a unique antimicrobial stewardship rounds simulation activity in an infectious disease elective involving a simulated electronic health record, hospital formulary, telephone directory, live telephone call to a simulated provider, and written documentation. Attendees will learn how the activity could be implemented at their own institution.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the implementation of a simulated antimicrobial stewardship rounds activity within an infectious disease elective.
  2. Discuss lessons learned and strategies to overcome barriers when implementing simulated activities within an elective course.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-026-H04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Elizabeth Covington, Samford University; (Speaker) Jeffrey Kyle, Samford University

Leveraging International Collegial Networks: Supporting One Another During Challenging Times

This program targets faculty interested in developing collegial support networks internationally to support one another through difficult times. Collegial support networks have been shown to enhance faculty productivity, satisfaction, and success. Attendees will understand how collegial support networks can be expanded to international partners and the unique benefits that they provide. Through case presentations and active learning, attendees will explore how they can leverage international networks to be a source of collegial support during uncertainty.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain three evidence-based benefits of developing and strengthening international collegial networks.
  2. Examine approaches for identifying and expanding international collegial networks related to work/life balance, professional development, and social justice to better support one another.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-027-H04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) David Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Vivienne Mak, Monash University

Qualitative Research: Primer for the Everyday Faculty Member

Qualitative research in pharmacy education and practice has potential to advance the profession, yet many faculty lack training in this methodology. The goal of this session is to promote qualitative research as viable and important, and to increase acceptance of how its complexity and utility can benefit pharmacy research. This session will explore the value of qualitative research, how it differs from quantitative research, and how to transform misconceptions surrounding qualitative research into practical steps.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the value and application of qualitative research in pharmacy.
  2. Compare and contrast qualitative and quantitative nomenclature and methodologies.
  3. Reformulate common misconceptions about qualitative research into new possibilities for pharmacy research.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-028-H04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Organizer) Lindsey Moseley, Auburn University; (Speaker) Lindsey Moseley, Auburn University; (Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Meagen Rosenthal, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Beverly Fitzpatrick, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Showcasing a Postgraduate Training Pipeline Fostering Pharmacy Leaders in Behavioral Health, Public Health and Addiction

This session will describe the development and outcomes of an experiential learning pipeline and new Behavioral Health Pharmacy PGY1 Residency Program for students and postgraduates seeking public health, behavioral health, and substance use disorder focused training. The presenters will share their experience creating these programs in collaboration with a college of pharmacy, city public health agency and community partners. The target audience includes experiential preceptors and others seeking to build innovative and cross-disciplinary experiential programs.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Develop a plan for implementing a behavioral health and substance use disorder focused experiential learning pipeline for student pharmacists in collaboration with local public health agencies.
  2. Outline the components and expected outcomes of a Behavioral Health Pharmacy PGY1 Residency Program in a community-based public health practice setting.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-029-H04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Daniel Ventricelli, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Oluwatoyin Fadeyibi, Community Behavioral Health

Strengthening Our Ties: College of Pharmacy Engagement in Establishing Payer-Provider Relationships

As healthcare shifts from fee-for-service to pay-for-performance models, schools and colleges of pharmacy can occupy an essential role in establishing successful payer-provider relationships through adoption of novel practices and the ability to convene key stakeholders in innovative efforts. This workshop-style session will consider principles of successful academic engagement in payer-provider partnerships, highlight the efforts of two colleges, and create space for participants to reflect on strategies their institutions could support pharmacy engagement in value-based collaborations.

Take 5!, Integrating Well-Being into a Required Course Sequence in a Pharm.D. Curriculum

Resilience and ability to cope with stress in an ever-changing healthcare system is a necessary skill for Pharm.D. students. “Take 5” is a series of wellness skill-building activities that promote student well-being and self-care in an intensive, required course sequence. This mini-session shares details of our well-being incorporation model, as well as implementation experience in a team-taught, integrated course. Faculty and staff at various levels will benefit from the description and discussion.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recognize the importance of well-being skills for student pharmacists engaged in an rigorous academic program.
  2. Demonstrate opportunities for well-being and resilience building skills through application activities.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-031-H04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kristine Cline, The Ohio State University

Teaching on Half the Story: The Case of Systemic Racism

Per Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education standards, pharmacy graduates are required to recognize social determinants of health (SDOH). However, there are no such standards for systemic racism, which is recognized as a root cause of SDOH and health disparities. With recent publications and organizations recognizing racism as a public health crisis, it is incumbent upon schools of pharmacy to include training on systemic racism. Current practices of systemic racism education within pharmacy curricula will be described and shared with the audience.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of systemic racism education within pharmacy curricula.
  2. Compare and contrast systemic racism training and barriers to integration in seven schools of pharmacy.
  3. Evaluate systemic racism education at one’s home institution to identify barriers and gaps in delivery.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-032-H04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Organizer) Kris Denzel Tupas, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Kris Denzel Tupas, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Edo-abasi McGee, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine; (Speaker) Troy Lynn Lewis, Pharm.D., Wilkes University; (Speaker) Marina Kawaguchi-Suzuki, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Hope Campbell, Belmont University

There are NO Contraindications to Lifestyle Medicine: Let’s Learn, Practice and Educate!

Do you believe that healthy eating, physical activity, sleep, stress management, reducing substance use and social connections are the key to health and wellness? There is an abundance of evidence that lifestyle interventions play a critical role in preventing, treating, and reversing disease. Those who practice and learn it are more likely to include it in patient care. Presenters from three institutions will describe models for incorporation of lifestyle medicine in curricular and co-curricular settings.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Review the components of lifestyle medicine [LM] and its evidence-based role in chronic disease prevention and treatment.
  2. Describe successful models of the incorporation of lifestyle medicine education in the didactic, experiential, and co-curricular settings.
  3. Formulate approaches to incorporate lifestyle medicine education into the curriculum, self, student and patient care.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-033-H04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Sneha Srivastava, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker) Ashok Philip, Union University; (Speaker) Nicole White, Creighton University

Attracting Diversity: What Factors are Important to Under-represented Minorities When Selecting a School of Pharmacy?

In this session attendees will learn what factors are the most important to under-represented minority (URM) students in selecting a school of pharmacy, (SOP) and how that may differ from non-minority students. Data is presented based on a survey of admitted students to a college of pharmacy in Tennessee. Attendees will be able to determine if their own institutional strategies aimed at diversifying the student body addresses the factors identified as important to diverse students.

(Speaker) Hope Campbell, Belmont University

Design and Evaluation of an Advanced Cardiovascular Elective for APPE Readiness

This interactive session will describe one institution’s success with creation of an advanced cardiovascular elective which improved student perceptions of APPE readiness. Through a workshopping session, the audience will be invited to apply the components of this elective in creating their own draft syllabus to be easily adapted to their clinical subject matter expertise.

(Speaker) Cait Gibson, University of North Texas; (Speaker) Meredith Howard, University of North Texas

Focusing the Pupil: Mindfulness in the Curriculum

Techniques to encourage stress management and well-being in pharmacy students are needed. Meditative mindfulness is a quick and effective tool to improve pharmacy students’ focus and awareness. Implementation of brief meditative mindfulness sessions throughout a semester increases students' perceived ability to stay focused while completing tasks—a requisite to mitigate burnout.

(Speaker) Becky Linn, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Lauren Biehle, University of Wyoming

Life of a Pill: An Active-Learning Introduction to the Pharmaceutical Sciences

In order to cultivate pharmacy student engagement in pharmaceutical sciences, it is important that faculty involve students in thought-provoking active-learning activities that deepen their understanding and appreciation of how a drug’s physiochemical properties determine its journey through the human body as the drug undergoes the pharmacokinetic processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME). In this session, we share with you one such active learning exercise we have implemented in our first-year pharmaceutical sciences course

(Speaker) H. Michael Ellerby, Touro University California; (Speaker) Vanishree Rajagopalan, Touro University California

Monday, July 19

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Opening General Session: Combatting Anti-Science Thinking

In this session, Mary Woolley, president and CEO of Research!America, will lead a conversation with Georges C. Benjamin, Executive Director of the American Public Health Association and Bruce Gellin, President of Global Immunization, Sabin Vaccine Institute. The panel will address the disturbing trends in anti-science thinking and ongoing efforts within their organizations to address it. The panel will share specific ways colleges and schools of pharmacy, their faculty, and students can join with efforts to combat the anti-science movement.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the history associated with anti-science thinking.
  2. Analyze recent trends in anti-science thinking with emphasis on vaccine hesitancy.
  3. Discuss approaches for scientists to address anti-science thinking.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-034-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Mary Woolley, Research!America; (Speaker) Georges Benjamin, American Public Health Association; (Speaker) Bruce Gellin, Sabin Vaccine Institute

11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Creating GiANT Leaders: A Toolkit for Liberation

Do you fight for the highest possible good for those you lead? Participants will be introduced to the GiANT Worldwide program—a simple, scalable, and sustainable toolkit for developing leaders. Three colleges of pharmacy will review success stories for implementing GiANT tools, showcasing the diversity of uses, from personal development to faculty and student development. Participants will complete a needs assessment and potential action plan for incorporation of the GiANT system at their institution.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the GiANT Worldwide program and associated tools.
  2. Contrast how different COPs have implemented the GiANT Worldwide tools in their institution.
  3. Evaluate opportunities for leadership development at your institution.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-036-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kristy Brittain, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Melissa Chudow, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Gina Craft, The University of Louisiana at Monroe; (Speaker) Melissa Ruble, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Alan Spies, Summit Partner Services

11:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Unleashing the Power of the Right Brain: Implications for the Pharmacy Student

Daniel Pink’s A Whole New Mind describes a societal shift from factory/knowledge workers (left-brained) to creators/empathizers (right-brained). He attributes this shift to abundance, automation, and outsourcing. Each have impacted pharmacy, putting our profession at risk of becoming obsolete. In this age of abundance, our students are facing workforce challenges. With fast-growing technology (AI and remote pharmacy options like Amazon Pharmacy), we must capitalize on characteristics that make us essential within the current dynamic pharmacy landscape.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recognize how important threats students face upon graduation create the need for right-brain skill development.
  2. Identify right-brain focused (high concept, high touch) activities within the curriculum that capitalize upon the whole mind approach.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-037-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Sarah Cox, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Speaker) Angela Brownfield, University of Missouri–Kansas City

11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Pandemic Pandemonium: Student Recruitment, Admission, and Orientation During a Time of Turmoil

Enrollment trends in academic pharmacy were already the cause for grave concern prior to the pandemic. The arrival of COVID-19 forced Doctor of Pharmacy programs to reevaluate, repurpose, and reimagine the world of student recruitment, admission, and orientation. Hear from three programs who pivoted their efforts to continue to deliver results amidst a period of virtual engagement, from online interviews and recruitment events to welcoming new student cohorts with new health and safety precautions.

(Speaker) Joel Spiess, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Krystal Ward, The University of New Mexico; (Speaker) Heather Petrelli, University of South Florida

12:20 p.m.–12:50 p.m.

Pressure to Perform: Maximizing Learning and Minimizing Cheating

Academic dishonesty invokes emotional responses whenever discussed. Many factors contribute to pharmacy students cheating. Literature primarily focuses on changing student behavior and environmental factors. One factor not explored well is design of learning assessments. Assessment for learning has driven incorporation of graded formative assessments throughout curricula, but it may be putting unneeded stress on students, tempting them to cheat. This session will explore the use of ungraded formative assessments to maximize learning and minimize cheating.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the impact of the testing effect on learning.
  2. Differentiate between performing and learning.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-038-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Lindsey Childs-Kean, University of Florida; (Speaker) Michelle Farland, University of Florida

12:20 p.m.–12:50 p.m.

Opioid-Related Activities in Academic Pharmacy: Review and Update

AACP launched the Opioid-Related Activity Database in February 2019. The database has since grown to 460 activities, submitted by 110 institutions. These activities encompass areas in education, research, service, practice, and advocacy. This session will provide an overview of activities at schools and highlight research and important findings from the data collection.

(Speaker & Moderator) Thomas Maggio, AACP; (Speaker) Andria Church, Palm Beach Atlantic University; (Speaker) Trisha Patel, Student Pharmacist - University of the Sciences; Daniel J. Ventricelli, University of the Sciences

12:45 p.m.–1:15 p.m.

Meet the AJPE Editors

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education? Do you have a question about AJPE? Connect and meet with the editors and staff of AJPE.

(Speaker) Gayle Brazeau, Marshall University; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky

12:45 p.m.–1:15 p.m.

Screen Break/Mindfulness Activity

1:15 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

From Bench to Bedside to Bin: Teaching Environmental Sustainability Principles Across the Pharmacy Curriculum

Environmental conditions are social determinants of health contributing to global health inequities. As climate change policies develop, pharmacists must take action to minimize these disparities. Environmental stewardship education can support future healthcare leaders, yet few pharmacy schools address this topic. During this 60-minute session, we describe the implementation of climate change and sustainability curricula in three pharmacy schools and encourage participants to share ideas for learning opportunities within their institutions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe pharmacists’ role in addressing climate change and global health equity.
  2. Identify opportunities for climate change education across instructional contexts.
  3. Develop an ‘advocacy pitch’ to incorporate climate change within your pharmacy curriculum.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-039-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) Katherine Gruenberg, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Alice Gahbauer, University of Charleston; (Speaker) Catherine Forrester, Monash University; (Speaker) Ashley Lam, University of Charleston

1:15 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Peer Evaluation 2.0: Making Your Peer Feedback or Coaching Program Work for YOU

Processes for improving the quality of teaching vary widely between institutions, and even within schools for different contexts of instruction. This session will engage attendees in examining the challenges and opportunities of designing and implementing effective peer review and coaching programs. Using a quality assurance framework, participants will take away concrete ideas for designing a program or enhancing the quality of the existing program aimed at improving teaching and learning at their institutions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the impact of peer review programs with particular emphasis on improving teaching and learning.
  2. Evaluate opportunities for growth in implementing peer review programs.
  3. Develop a specific actionable plan to evaluate an existing program or implement a new program.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-040-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kathryn Morbitzer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Margarita DiVall, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Brianna Henson, University of Kentucky

1:15 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Scaffolding for Success: Mentoring K-12 Students to Develop an Intentionally Diverse Pharmacy School Applicant Pool

Many colleges of pharmacy experience challenges recruiting students from underrepresented populations. Attracting this student population requires outreach early during their K-12 education. Students often need coaching and mentoring to affirm their capabilities in disciplines where they are less visible. This helps promote confidence that they can succeed in pharmacy school. Exposure to the myriad of career opportunities in pharmacy is also critical. The implementation of such vertical outreach for underrepresented K-12 students will be discussed.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the reasons for implementing a vertical, intentional, and targeted outreach program for historically marginalized and underrepresented K-12 students.
  2. Draft a potential course outline for a vertical mentoring and coaching program targeted toward under represented K-12 learners.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-041-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) M. Lynn Crismon, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Skyller Walkes, The University of Texas at Austin

1:15 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Weaving Genomics Into the DNA of Pharmacy Practice—2021 Update of Genomics Competencies for Pharmacists

Pharmacogenomics is rapidly evolving with pharmacists recognized as healthcare professionals leading its integration in clinical practice. To ensure our Pharm.D. curricula remain current with this contemporary pharmacy practice need, the AACP Pharmacogenomics SIG recently updated the widely-recognized Genetics/Genomics Competency Center (G2C2) pharmacist competencies in genomics. This session will introduce the 2021 updates and how they map to the Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for pharmacists. The session will also address challenges and opportunities to integrate these updated competencies into the pharmacy curriculum.

(Speaker) Otito Iwuchukwu, Farleigh Dickinson University; (Speaker) Roseann Gammal, MCPHS University; (Speaker) David Kisor, Manchester University; (Speaker) Philip Empey, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Natasha Petry, North Dakota State University; (Moderator) Yee Ming Lee, University of Colorado

1:15 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Volwiler and Dawson Awards Presentation

1:50 p.m.–2:20 p.m.

Research and Scholarship for Junior Clinical Faculty: Boom or Bust

Research and scholarly activity are inevitably part of expectations for clinical faculty. With many competing expectations, including teaching and developing or maintaining a clinical practice site, the ability for junior practice faculty to build their research practice and make meaningful contributions to their institution’s research mission can seem daunting. This session will provide junior practice faculty with practical solutions on how to develop, maintain, and grow a pipeline of practice- and teaching-based scholarship.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe scholarly productivity strategies including research prioritization, time management, planning, and collaboration.
  2. Apply research and scholarship strategies by formulating a personalized scholarly productivity plan.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-042-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Taylor Steuber, Auburn University; (Speaker) Meredith Howard, University of North Texas

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Comparative Analysis and Assessment of Remote Versus In-person Instruction During a Pandemic

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, most institutions were forced to shift to remote or virtual instructional delivery quickly. This transition provided challenges for many institutions globally. This presentation will discuss key strategies employed in remote teaching and provide a comparative analysis of didactic, laboratory, and experiential activities during remote versus in-person instruction. It will also offer helpful tips for faculty and student success in online teaching and learning.

(Moderator & Speaker) Asish Dutta, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Rajesh Vadlapatla, Marshall B. Ketchum University; (Speaker) Ajoy Koomer, Marshall B. Ketchum University; (Speaker) Anita Mosley, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Surajit Dey, Roseman University of Health Sciences

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Equity in Pharmacy Education: What is Holding Us Back?

Recognizing how constructs of power and influence impact our institutions, schools of pharmacy are positioned to develop operational strategies that embody the principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion. This level of transformation requires addressing barriers in leadership, infrastructure, policy, and curriculum. This session will provide the foundational groundwork for participants to work on strategies that will lead to inclusive and equitable communities and prepare a culturally intelligent pharmacy workforce to impact human health worldwide.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recognize the historical context of power constructs, influence, and systemic challenges that perpetuate inequality.
  2. Discuss a process and apply applications for engaging key stakeholders, developing and operationalizing an institutional strategy to promote equity.
  3. Review and reflect on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Plans across multiple institutions with uniquely different structures and needs.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-044-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Carla White, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Michael Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Sharon Youmans, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Malaika Turner, Howard University

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

From Map to Act: Engaging Teaching Faculty in the Curricular Mapping Process and Evaluation

Teaching faculty are well-positioned to document and use curricular maps. Using a logic model framework, this session proposes ways to engage faculty in purposefully situated and designed mapping process that promote faculty learning and a culture of shared teaching practices. We showcase key faculty development activities and resources that support mapping accuracy and meaningfulness, ways to embed mapping tasks in existing course design processes, and low-technology automatic reporting solutions for efficient data use.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify one outcome/impact that you would like to achieve through your curricular mapping activities.
  2. Describe two inputs (e.g., personnel, resources, tools) and two outputs (e.g., deliverables, activities, engagement) that you plan to incorporate (or you currently incorporate) to achieve the intended outcome/impact of the curriculum map activities.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-045-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Katherine Gruenberg, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Yukiko Watanabe, University of California, San Francisco

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

The Pivot Needed: Incorporating Telehealth Throughout the Pharmacy School Curriculum

Telehealth has moved to the forefront as a way to deliver patient care. Pharmacists in all practice settings are expected to have the knowledge and skills to be ready to utilize telehealth. This session will help provide faculty with practical tips for incorporating students into telehealth in clinical practice and successful incorporation of those skills into the classroom and assessments so students enter the profession “practice-ready.”

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify key skills necessary for a Pharm.D. graduate to perform telehealth.
  2. Describe successful models of incorporating telehealth into the curriculum.
  3. Develop actionable steps to implement telehealth educational activities at your institution.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-046-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kylie Barnes, University of Missouri - Kansas City; (Speaker) Danielle Miller, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Pamela Stamm, Auburn University; (Speaker) Tricia Gangoo Dookhan, Nova Southeastern University; (Moderator) Kristi Kelley, Auburn University

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Will My Students Have a Job After Graduation? Providing “Outside the Box” Workforce Solutions

With a quickly-contracting job market for pharmacists and never enough post-graduate residency positions, it is essential to understand current and future workforce data to help pharmacy graduates find meaningful employment. We will explore the positive outlook for nontraditional pharmacy jobs, and foster discussion about cultivating timeless skills that are applicable within and outside the profession. Attendees will leave this session with a broader perspective on how to give their students useful career guidance.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the current state of job market/workforce for pharmacy graduates.
  2. Educate students about their skill set that is applicable to entrepreneurial endeavors and non-pharmacist work environments.
  3. Identify unique pathways to help students explore job alternatives or to diversify their skill set, as well as what your institution could do differently to better position students for employment.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-047-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Justine Gortney, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Sharon Park, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Lisa Lebovitz, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Srikanth Kolluru, Keck Graduate Institute

3:05 p.m.–3:35 p.m.

Planting Seeds: Utilizing APPE Students to Grow Pharmacy Practice

There is a national movement to advance the practice of pharmacy. In addition, ACPE Standard 4 calls for Doctor of Pharmacy programs to impart innovation and entrepreneurship in their graduates. So how can schools and colleges of pharmacy successfully contribute to both of these efforts? Attend this engaging session to learn how an innovative scholarship program contributed to the advancement of pharmacy practice by empowering APPE students to implement and expand pharmacy services.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how the development and implementation of an APPE scholarship program can enhance innovation in pharmacy practice.
  2. List the necessary steps and resources needed to implement a successful APPE scholarship program to advance pharmacy practice.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-048-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Elizabeth Skoy, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Natasha Petry, North Dakota State University

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Screen Break/Mindfulness Activity

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Change Drivers in Higher Education: Implications for the Pharmacy Academy to Reflect, Respond, and Re-Imagine

External forces have come together to create a perfect storm for pharmacy education. Politics, funding, and declining enrollments are forcing institutions to adapt while students are becoming more digital, social, and anxious. Employers are increasingly helping us shape our programs for the jobs to be done. The Covid-19 crisis is accelerating the urgency for change. This session will focus on harnessing the energy and impetus for shaping the future of pharmacy education.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define the driving forces of change facing pharmacy education.
  2. Give examples of responses to drivers of change in pharmacy education.
  3. Propose new opportunities for innovation in pharmacy education.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-049-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator & Speaker) Denise Rhoney, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) Cindy Stowe, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

4:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Developing Inclusive Leaders: Incorporating Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Into Pharmacy Student Leadership Training

Developing inclusive professionals who embrace diversity is critical to advancing pharmacy and healthcare worldwide. A holistic approach to integrating these concepts throughout the Pharm.D. program may include developing focused course content and leveraging novel curricular course design infrastructures such as course streams. This session will describe curricular structures in place to support diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) content in the Pharm.D. program, as well as strategies to incorporate DEI training in pharmacy student leadership coursework.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify strategies to increase awareness of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in pharmacy student leadership training.
  2. Discuss novel curricular structures to support the integration of DEI content throughout the pharmacy student learning experience.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-050-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jacqueline Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) David Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Virtual PharmSci Research Opportunities for Pharm.D. Students

There is a growing interest among pharmacy students to participate in research activities. However, there are barriers to increase the availability of laboratory-based traditional research projects. This session is intended to explore various virtual research opportunities within pharmaceutical science disciplines. The speakers will focus on three main areas as listed below, discuss the advantages and challenges associated with each, and showcase successful examples.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss general areas of virtual research opportunities in pharmaceutical sciences.
  2. Provide successful examples of virtual research projects driven by pharmacy students.
  3. Discuss the advantages and challenges of virtual research for pharmacy students.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-051-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator & Speaker) Lipika Chablani, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Sudip Das, Butler University; (Speaker) Subrata Deb, Larkin University

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Microsessions: Professional Development for Faculty and Staff in the Academy

4:00 p.m.–4:10 p.m.

360 Evaluations for Course Quality Improvement

A 360-evaluation solicits feedback from all directions. This session will review the use of 360-style evaluations for course quality improvement within a large team-taught interdisciplinary course.

(Speaker) Kristine Cline, The Ohio State University

4:10 p.m.–4:20 p.m.

Empowering Student Pharmacists to Respond Quickly and Decisively in Emergency Situations

In a span of just a few months, COVID-19 has thrust pharmacists into the healthcare spotlight as accessible, essential, and capable providers of care to society. This session will inspire pharmacy faculty to intentionally shape future pharmacists so that they are recognized as a powerful resource both to patients and to society as first-responders when medical emergencies present themselves.

(Speaker) Jeffrey Bates, Cedarville University

4:20 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Synergizing Faculty Development and Collaboration Through Multi-institution Book Club

United by a pandemic, four colleges/schools of pharmacy came together to build their faculty through an online book club to learn more about online teaching and evidenced-based teaching strategies. Over the span of two months, the members bonded through a common mission of bettering themselves and their skills, but more importantly, they created a sense of community. This book club proved to administrators the power of a simple faculty development activity can have on the lives of faculty and ultimately their future students.

(Speaker) Sarah Anderson, University of North Carolina at Chapel hill

4:30 p.m.–4:40 p.m.

The Lunch Bunch—Fostering Faculty and Staff Leadership Through Community and Conversation

Many faculty and staff desire leadership training for career advancement; however, attending formal leadership programs may not be attainable due to personal or professional conflicts. A monthly leadership article club was designed to foster leadership within a pharmacy school by informally gathering interested faculty and staff that provided a safe environment for discussion on leadership concepts. For three years, this activity has been successful, bringing all ranks of faculty and staff from various departments together to engage in leadership discussions.

(Speaker) Lea Eiland, Auburn University

4:40 p.m.–4:50 p.m.

Understanding by Design: How to Apply Backward Design When Teaching

The backward design methodology is an instructional design technique that ensures courses and lessons are created to accomplish specific goals with appropriately aligned teaching and assessment methods. In this session, participants will learn about the backward design method and the strategies that can support more effective courses and learning activities. Participants will be provided examples of the backward design thinking approach in classroom and experiential settings; the approach will ensure objectives, assessment, and teachings strategies are aligned for a complete learning experience.

(Speaker) Michael Wolcott, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy/Adams School of Dentistry

4:50 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Q&A with Microsession Speakers

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Extra! Extra! Incorporating the Rhythm of Journalism Principles in Academic Writing

Is your passion for scholarship hidden behind your choice of language? Do you struggle to explain aspects of your work because you already inherently “get it”? A quick journey into the field of journalism may soothe those aching woes. Telling your story while meaningfully engaging your audience requires conciseness, clarity, and a rhythm to your writing. This session will explore key strategies for employing relevant concepts from journalism to academic writing.

(Moderator & Speaker) Daniel Malcom, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Robin Zavod, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky

4:35 p.m.–5:05 p.m.

Small Gestures, Big Impacts: Incorporating Well-Being Practices in the Classroom

Creating a sense of community, genuine compassion and flexibility, and promoting healthy coping strategies in the classroom is essential during a time when students feel a loss of connection and less likely to seek help. This session is designed to equip faculty with engaging, fun, and easy-to-implement activities to promote student well-being into large classroom and patient care laboratory settings. Attendees will be given opportunities to reflect on examples as ideas for their own institutions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe 3 examples and challenges for implementing well-being activities for learners in classroom and patient care laboratory settings.
  2. Identify 2 approaches for development of classroom environments that are supportive of student well-being.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-052-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Suzanne Harris, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Heidi Anksorus, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Her Research Matters: Equity and Diversity in Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

This program will explore evidence and implications of representation and visibility of women in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences teaching and research. Participants will discover common barriers and facilitators to women’s representation and visibility in this context. Finally, participants will discuss and construct methods to overcome barriers.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss reasons for imbalance of representation versus visibility of women compared to men in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences teaching and research.
  2. Identify implications of this imbalance on teaching in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences.
  3. Discuss mechanisms to lower barriers and equalize women’s representation and visibility in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences teaching and research.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-035-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Caroline Sasser, University of North Carolina; (Speaker) Mine Orlu, UCL School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Natalie Trevaskis, Monash University; (Speaker) Karen Gregory, Monash University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Coaching to Fail in Experiential Learning: How to Help Preceptors Approach Poorly Performing Students

Despite our best efforts, occasionally students do not perform well during experiential learning. In this interactive session, we will use a published framework to discuss six reasons preceptors fail to fail underperforming students. Solutions will be presented and discussed based on three protective “enabler” factors that lead preceptors to submit failing grades. This session will help faculty and staff in experiential education offices better support preceptors.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify six common barriers to providing accurate assessments of students who are underperforming.
  2. Describe three enabler strategies that help preceptors overcome barriers identified.
  3. Analyze selected case studies in order to create a coaching plan for preceptors.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-053-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kate Newman, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Lisa Richter, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Jennifer Danielson, University of Washington

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Identifying the Core Concepts that Underpin Pharmacy Education

This session will engage participants in the Core Concepts that Underpin Pharmacy Education Project run by The PharmAlliance Education Domain, a collaboration between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University College London and Monash University. It is a multi-year, multi-site project aimed at identifying the core pharmacy concepts, and developing robust, validated tests of concepts. In a guided session, participants will learn about and contribute to the identification of core concepts and related inventories.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define core concepts that underpin pharmacy education, and concept inventories that assess core concepts.
  2. Contribute to the development of core concepts and MCQs that test the attainment of a core concept.
  3. Identify two to three ways in which core concepts can be used to shape and evaluate Pharm.D. curricula and innovations in teaching that relate to the foundational knowledge that underpins pharmacy education.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-054-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Thomas Angelo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Paul White, Monash University; (Speaker) Michael Munday, University College London; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Performing at Your Best: Using Emotional Intelligence to Promote Faculty Well-Being

Highly energized and efficient flow states promote job satisfaction and improved attitudes towards responsibilities. Through self- and social-awareness we can recognize and gravitate toward projects that activate and energize, and address activities that drain energy and emotional resources. By managing mindsets and other ways of thinking, we can develop collaborative and supportive relationships promoting resiliency. Strategies will be described for using metacognition and mindfulness to reframe tasks and responsibilities, and recognize the importance of self-compassion.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how the four primary elements of emotional intelligence can be used to promote the development of healthy and supportive teams.
  2. Identify strategies for promoting Flow States of high efficiency in one’s self and others.
  3. Develop a strategy to foster personal and team resiliency.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-055-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, Chicago State University; (Speaker) Charisse Johnson, Chicago State University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Anita Cleven, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) David Fuentes, Academic Consulting Services

5:15 p.m.–5:45 p.m.

Going Boldly Into the New Frontier: Leading Pharmacy Education Digital Transformation for the Virtual Era

A well-planned digital transformation of a professional curriculum is essential to the future generations of learners and educators. Although a global pandemic forced educational institutions into a virtual world of teaching and learning, adopting the comprehensive digital transformation of curricula is critical to addressing the instructional needs of future pharmacists.

(Speaker) Edith Mirzaian, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Kari Franson, University of South Carolina

5:50 p.m.–6:20 p.m.

Making the Calculation: Creating an Intentional Online Pharmaceutical Calculations Course

Math is hard, but math class shouldn’t be tedious. Faculty members responsible for foundational knowledge of pharmaceutical calculations and developing problem-solving skills are encouraged to attend this discussion on the key elements for intentionally creating an engaging, online calculations course. In addition, speakers will introduce educational technology tools that created a supportive community in the remote learning environment. Participants will walk away with variables to integrate into their courses for an equation to student success.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain key elements for intentionally creating an engaging online pharmaceutical calculations course.
  2. Prioritize elements in the design and implementation of an online pharmaceutical calculations course at respective institutions.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-122-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Apryl Anderson, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Alexis Crawford, Virginia Commonwealth University

Tuesday, July 20

9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session I

The list of roundtable topics and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting platform.

(Moderator) David Holdford, Virginia Commonwealth University

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Special Session: Reports of the 2020-2021 Standing Committees

The session provides interested attendees an opportunity to interact with the standing committees: Academic Affairs, Argus Commission, Professional Affairs, Research and Graduate Affairs, Strategic Engagement, and Student Affairs. Following brief presentations by committee chairs on the key recommendations contained in the report, discussions on the reports and implementation strategies will be led by committee members.

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Adams, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Cynthia J. Boyle, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Andrew Bzowyckyj, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Kimberly B. Garza, Auburn University; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Gina D. Moore, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Innovation in Teaching Award

The recipients of the 2021 Innovation in Teaching Award, Stephanie Hsia and Rupa Tuan, will present their project A Remote Health Equity Curriculum: Teaching Pharmacy Students to be Advocates for Social Justice.

(Moderator) Brian Erstad, University of Arizona;(Speaker) Stephanie L. Hsia, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Rupa L. Tuan, University of California, San Francisco

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

“Survey Says:” The What, When, and How Pharmacy Programs are Incorporating Well-Being Initiatives Into Curriculum

Health is defined as an optimal state of physical, emotional, mental, social, and spiritual well-being. Schools and colleges of pharmacy have an opportunity and obligation to cultivate well-being and resiliency among all stakeholders. A survey to assess the depth and breadth of well-being initiatives was distributed nationally to all United States and Canadian schools and colleges of pharmacy. Findings captured will be shared along with diverse models of well-being experiences (didactic, elective, co-curricular, and experiential).

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the landscape of well-being initiatives in U.S. and Canadian schools and colleges of pharmacy based on data obtained from a comprehensive survey.
  2. Explore diverse models of incorporating well-being initiatives into schools and colleges of pharmacy within the didactic, elective, co-curricular, and experiential realms.
  3. Develop a plan to establish or strengthen well-being experiences for students, residents, faculty, and staff within home institutions.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-056-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Elizabeth Buckley, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Seena Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Simi Gunaseelan, Texas A&M University; (Speaker) Christina DeRemer, University of Florida; (Speaker) Karen Kopacek, University of Wisconsin–Madison

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Cutting Up and Resetting: Therapeutic and Pharmacy Education Relevance of CRISPR and Stem Cell Therapy

This session will present principles, methodology, and pharmacy-related applications of two emerging technologies namely, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and cardiac progenitor stem cell therapy. These innovative technologies are rapidly developing and represent the frontier of novel therapies. The goal is to provide educators and practitioners with conceptual knowledge, research applications, clinical uses, and methods to incorporate these emerging therapies in pharmacy education and practice.

(Chair) Diane Calinski, Manchester University; (Moderator) Diane Calinski, Manchester University; (Moderator) Michelle Assa-Eley, AACP; (Speaker) Farid Khalafalla, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Ajay Sharma, Chapman University; (Speaker) Wei Lei, Presbyterian College

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacy Curriculum: A Comprehensive Analysis of Curricular Outcomes in U.S. Pharmacy Programs

The impact of pharmaceutical sciences on curricular outcomes in Pharm.D. programs is challenging to systematically assess. We examined the impact of medicinal chemistry integration on first-time and all-time NAPLEX student performance across all U.S. pharmacy programs from 2015-2019. We will present our comprehensive correlational analysis comparing aggregated deidentified NAPLEX outcomes between programs with standalone, sequential, and integrated medicinal chemistry approaches. Modalities of integration, including partial integration strategies, and common emergent themes will be discussed.

(Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, California Northstate University; (Speaker) MO Faruk Khan, University of Charleston; (Speaker) Karrie Murphy, University of Charleston; (Speaker) Ronald Carico, Jr., Marshall Health

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Utilizing Friday Night at the ER to Promote Interprofessional Education and Systems Thinking

Teaching students about systems thinking is often best accomplished through active learning. This presentation will highlight the utilization of Friday Night at the ER (FNAER) within an interprofessional education program. FNAER teaches applied systems thinking, innovation, collaboration, data-driven decision making, and designing structure. At our school, we incorporate students from three different professional programs but at other institutions, students from any discipline could benefit from this experience to prepare them for their future interprofessional roles.

(Speaker) M. Jeanna Sewell, Auburn University

10:35 a.m.–11:05 a.m.

How Do They Do It? How Successful Clinical Faculty Produce Educational Scholarship

Pursuing educational scholarship can be challenging, especially for clinical faculty juggling multiple competing responsibilities. For successful clinical faculty, what factors contribute to their success and productivity? This session will share evidence-based strategies used by productive clinical faculty focusing on five areas: The Team, The Project, The Process, Inputs & Assets, and Scholarly Maturation. This session will provide development insights for residents, graduate students, faculty, and those who desire to support strong educational practice.

(Speaker) Eliza Dy-Boarman, Drake University; (Speaker) Kristin Janke, University of Minnesota

11:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Considering the Role of Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy in Legislative Advocacy

This session will guide participants through a reflection of their institution’s role in legislative policy. Presenters will describe the results of a national survey evaluating colleges’ and schools’ of pharmacy practices in teaching legislative advocacy and involvement of faculty/staff and students in this area. Organizational reflection techniques will highlight strategies to engage in legislative advocacy as an academic institution. The target audience for this session are faculty members interested in learning about legislative advocacy.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the involvement of colleges and schools of pharmacy in teaching legislative advocacy, and engagement of staff, faculty, postgraduates, students, and administrators in legislative advocacy.
  2. Describe opportunities to enhance involvement of colleges and schools of pharmacy in legislative advocacy.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-057-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) E. Michael Murphy, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Jennifer Rodis, The Ohio State University

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Developing SOTL Questions

Led by a panel of 2 AACP Distinguished Teaching Scholars who are AJPE Associate Editors and one AACP Emerging Teaching Scholar who is on the CPTL Editorial Board, this interactive session will focus on helping new/future faculty develop SOTL research questions and bringing those ideas to fruition. Panelists will share their approaches to generating ideas/developing plans and help attendees explore their own challenges developing SOTL questions. Session includes Q&A discussion between the audience and panelists.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Contrast SOTL and educational research.
  2. Explore strategies for generating SOTL manuscript/research ideas.
  3. Describe the steps to consider when planning a writing/research project including when and where to write.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-058-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Adam Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Diverse Paths to Leadership: A Panel Discussion with Current Leaders in the Academy

This panel discussion will bring together academic pharmacy and higher education leaders from different types of institutions to share their perspectives on various topics related to leadership, including insight on their evolution into higher education leadership roles. The panel will also provide guidance to faculty attendees interested in transitioning to a career in higher education administration. A moderator will facilitate the program to guide the panelists and audience through the discussion.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize the roles and responsibilities of different academic pharmacy and higher education leadership positions.
  2. Discuss the requirements, pathways, and obstacles associated with pursuing leadership roles in higher education.
  3. Identify strategies to build leadership skills and transition into a leadership position.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-059-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Cynthia Warrick, Stillman College; (Speaker) Anne Lin, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Oscar Garza, The University of Louisiana Monroe; (Speaker) Carla White, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) W. Thomas Smith, Manchester University

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Drug Information: A New Investigation Bringing Standardization to an Expected Skill for Matriculation

Drug information is at the core of pharmacy yet there is little published about this central skill. What is the EVIDENCE for teaching how to provide evidence-based information? It is integrated within the didactic and experiential components of the curriculum, and the expectation is that student pharmacists are ready to provide effective and accurate drug information. Although the term “drug information” is well established, there are still surprisingly several questions: what exactly constitutes drug information activities, how do we evaluate a student’s performance, what elements should be assessed? Spoiler: we have some answers.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize the role of drug information in Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs), CAPE 2016 Educational Outcomes, and current literature.
  2. Describe how various types of drug information activities in the curriculum at various schools/colleges of pharmacy are evaluated.
  3. Develop a standardized way for colleges and schools of pharmacies to evaluate drug information activities across the pharmacy curriculum.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-060-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Sneha Srivastava, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker) Kelly Bach, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) Danielle Candelario, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker) Megan Willson, Washington State University; (Speaker) Michelle Bottenberg, Drake University

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Innovation in Times of Crisis: Delivering Experiential Opportunities in the Remote Work Environment

The COVID-19 pandemic had a devastating and far-reaching impact on experiential education (EE) across the country. Innovation and creativity was crucial for keeping students on track in the curriculum. Solutions for adapting experiential activities to virtual settings while maintaining ACPE standards are necessary for all schools and colleges of pharmacy. Many impactful learning experiences were discovered through these innovations. This program will explore the unexpected benefits of remote experiential learning.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. List key components of ACPE guidance related to adaptation of experiential activities.
  2. Explain challenges and barriers to remote rotations.
  3. Describe remote experiential learning opportunities that are valuable for IPPE and APPE students and can be continued beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-061-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Alison Stevens, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis; (Speaker) Amy Tiemeier, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis; (Speaker) Suzanne Larson, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Janet Cooley, The University of Arizona

11:15 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

ACPE Open Hearing on Standards Revision

ACPE Open Hearing on Standards Revision.

(Speaker) Janet Engle, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education

11:50 a.m.–12:20 p.m.

Balancing Boundaries: Finding the Harmony in the Chaos

Balancing is defined as the process of achieving or maintaining equilibrium. Boundaries are defined as a sphere of activity. Working from home has prompted the need for faculty to take a proactive approach toward balancing and setting boundaries. Taking a holistic approach to balancing the boundaries of work with life has been shown to improve wellness among faculty. In this mini-session we will detail the importance of setting boundaries to improve productivity and decrease burnout.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe strategies for implementing boundaries with work and life.
  2. Identify areas of opportunity to balance boundaries when working from home.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-062-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Stacey Curtis, University of Florida; (Speaker) Jeff Cain, University of Kentucky

12:30 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Screen Break/Mindfulness Activity

12:45 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

First House of Delegates Session

First session of the House of Delegates.

(Moderator) Bradley Cannon, PharmD, Director of Experiential Education, Assistant Professor, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science

1:15 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Is the Juice Worth the Squeeze? Predictive Value of Competency-based Admission Interviews

Pharmacy academia is facing the unique challenge of balancing enrollment decline with admitting students who will be successful without taxing student support services. Predictive models for proactively identifying these students are needed. This session will facilitate open discussion about how programs support on-time progression, explore mechanisms of predictability of admission practices, and assessment methods that institutions can apply to their own program.

(Speaker) Laura Waite, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Lisa Charneski, University of the Sciences

1:50 p.m.–2:20 p.m.

Navigating the Bermuda Triangle of Continuous Quality Improvement in Skills Assessment

Are you stuck in the Bermuda Triangle with waves of data and not sure how to sail your way to skills-based curricular improvement? Presenters will discuss various data sources, including student performance data and student and stakeholder feedback, and how to utilize that data to drive improvements to skills-based courses. Lessons learned will be shared and attendees will evaluate practical ways to develop and/or revise a continuous quality improvement plan.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how rubric data, student evaluations, stakeholder perceptions, and programmatic data has been used to inform curricular improvement related to skills assessment.
  2. Discuss lessons learned from each institution when using data to enhance curricular skills-based assessment.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-063-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Andrea Porter, University of Wisconsin–Madison; (Speaker) Kali VanLangen, Ferris State University

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Come “See” Our Campus: Pharmacy School Recruiting in a New Virtual Landscape

Recruiting a quality and diverse pharmacy enrollment class presented challenges prior to COVID-19. Now, since the pandemic started, new and compounding challenges exist and colleges of pharmacy, like other higher education programs, must utilize new strategies, technologies, and resources to recruit students for admission. This session will examine new challenges to recruiting and highlight new opportunities, strategies, and potential advantages (e.g., diversity, equity) that arise with virtual recruiting.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate challenges, opportunities, and new advantages in pharmacy program enrollment.
  2. Develop three new strategies to more effectively recruit for pharmacy program enrollment in an increasingly virtual environment.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-064-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Nicholas Cox, The University of Utah; (Speaker) Kyle Turner, The University of Utah

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Embracing Authenticity: Leading With Your Best Self

Who do you want to “be”? What does it mean to lead authentically? This highly interactive session from a panel of pharmacy leaders will guide attendees through individualized inventories in order to engage with their core values and apply authenticity at any stage of their academic career. Attendees will leave this session with a personal commitment plan and methods of follow-up to embrace authenticity and overcome imposter syndrome.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the definition of authentic leadership with how you characterize authentic leadership in your life.
  2. Identify values that influence your approach to authentic leadership and academia.
  3. Describe strategies to embrace authenticity and overcome imposter syndrome.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-065-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Chair) Lauren Biehle, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Cynthia Boyle, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Amy Pick, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Speaker) Diane Ginsburg, The University of Texas at Austin

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Impostor Phenomenon: The Hidden Thorn Undermining Student Success

This session will explore Impostor Phenomenon (IP) and its impact on student success. IP describes high-achieving individuals who, despite their successes, fail to attribute their achievements to their work. Failing to address IP has implications for educational achievement and career development. This session will describe the results from a multi-campus IP study across undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral programs in pharmacy, business, and psychology. It will also provide tools for identifying IP and propose mitigating strategies.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define Impostor Phenomenon and discuss its implications on student educational achievement, advancement, and career development.
  2. Identify the relationships between IP and anxiety, grit, and coping.
  3. Develop strategies to address IP in student pharmacists.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-066-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Lilia Macias-Moriarity, South University; (Speaker) Miriam Purnell, University of Maryland Eastern Shore; (Speaker) Starlette Sinclair, Florida Gulf Coast University; (Speaker) Doretha Walker, South University

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Student and Preceptor Outcomes of Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA)-based APPE and IPPE Assessment Implementation

In this interactive session, Experiential Education teams from two colleges of pharmacy provide outcomes data following two years of successful implementation of EPA-based APPE and IPPE evaluations. This interactive session compares student outcomes between EPA-based and the prior CAPE-based evaluations at these two institutions. Changes in preceptor satisfaction related to EPA assessment implementation will also be described. This session will also facilitate participants’ brainstorming of approaches to incorporate EPAs into experiential learning at their institutions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Critically evaluate assessment approaches and implementation strategies for successful EPA implementation.
  2. Examine student assessment outcomes data generated from EPA-based evaluation tool implementation to better understand the value associated with implementing EPA-based IPPE and APPE evaluations.
  3. Interpret preceptor satisfaction outcomes data generated from EPA-based IPPE and APPE student evaluation implementation to understand the impact of EPA-based IPPE and APPE evaluation implementation on key stakeholders.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-067-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jennifer Baker, University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Whitney Maxwell, University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Cathy Worrall, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Elizabeth Weed, Medical University of South Carolina

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Approaches to Funding Graduate Students and Graduate Programs

Graduate programs find it increasingly difficult to fund their programs and their students. At the same time, graduate programs are an important component of pharmacy programs because of, for example, their important role in research. This program will discuss maximizing traditional sources and describe novel approaches to fund graduate programs with the goal of expanding sources of support.

(Speaker) James O'Donnell, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Andrew Coop, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Peter Swaan, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Suresh Madhavan, University of North Texas

3:05 p.m.–3:35 p.m.

Safe to Speak: Fostering a Psychologically Safe and Inclusive Teaching Environment

Psychological safety, defined as the perception to take risks, is necessary for inclusive learning. Educators can influence psychological safety by understanding contributing factors, assessing it among teams, and using strategies to foster psychologically safer learning environments. This session will showcase research about psychological safety and what contributes to and diminishes psychologically safety. Participants will also assess their perceptions and apply strategies to case examples so they will be prepared to foster psychological safer learning environments.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe psychological safety and its impact on collaboration and learning.
  2. Apply strategies to foster psychological safer learning environments.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-068-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Michael Wolcott, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy/Adams School of Dentistry; (Speaker) Kyle Turner, The University of Utah

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Screen Break/Mindfulness Activity

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Meet the AJPE Editors

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education? Do you have a question about AJPE? Connect and meet with the editors and staff of AJPE.

(Speaker) Gayle Brazeau, Marshall University

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Growing an Orchard of Scholarship Using Leadership Development Scholarship as an Example

Bearing the fruits of scholarship takes considerable time and effort. This session uses an apple orchard metaphor with an example of leadership development scholarship to guide us in bringing our scholarship of teaching and learning to publication and sustainability. A successful orchard develops based on many considerations including weather, soil, and farming practices. Likewise, successful scholarship considers many variables over the life cycle of the publication, line of inquiry, and the author's body of work.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify scholarship of teaching and learning initiatives and assess their scholarly potential.
  2. Recognize the maturity of a scholarship of teaching and learning initiative and the related implications in potential and publishing opportunities.
  3. Determine the actions that should be taken to support an initiative's scholarly dissemination at each phase of maturity (i.e., align actions with high potential opportunities).

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-069-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Andrew Traynor, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Robin Zavod, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Cortney Mospan, Wingate University; (Speaker) Benjamin Aronson, Ohio Northern University; (Speaker) Kristin Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Andrew Traynor, University of Minnesota

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

No Boarding Pass? No Problem! Reimagining Global Health Education During a Pandemic

As travel has come to a standstill with the pandemic, programs are reimagining what global health education may look like, both now and in the future. This program, targeting faculty and administrators, will discuss strategies for programs to adapt their global health education offerings in ways that are still impactful and purposeful. From virtual placements and project-based activities to experiences involving domestic partners, there are numerous approaches to sustain student interest in global health experiences.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the evolving global health education landscape during the coronavirus pandemic.
  2. Recognize four future trends in global health education.
  3. Develop an individualized action plan to adapt global health education at one’s home institution capitalizing on the opportunities of the four trends.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-070-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) David Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Ellen Schellhase, Purdue University; (Speaker) Melody Ryan, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Jeanine Abrons, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Monica Miller, Purdue University

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Microsessions: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

4:00 p.m.–4:10 p.m.

“This is the Way”—An Approach to Creation of a DEI Taskforce at One Institution

Increased focus on diversity, equity and inclusion based on recent events has prompted many institutions to reevaluate their approaches. This microsession will describe a stepwise process for initiating and developing DEI efforts that can be adapted to any organizational culture.

(Speaker) Charrell Lipscomb, University of the Sciences

4:10 p.m.–4:20 p.m.

Creating Advocates for Social Justice: A Remote Health Equity Curriculum in a Neuropsychiatric Course

In this session, we will describe the design, implementation, and outcomes of a remote Health Equity Curriculum in a Neuropsychiatric course aimed at teaching students to identify and recognize structural causes of health disparities, design interventions to reduce these causes, and to engage in equitable, civil, and compassionate discussions about systemic racism and implicit biases.

(Speaker) Stephanie Hsia, University of California, San Francisco

4:20 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Crucial Pieces Missing in Pharmacy Education: How to Work Effectively with Deaf/Hard of Hearing Patients

Attendees will learn about the implementation of additional deaf/hard of hearing patient content in the curriculum at one school of pharmacy. The impact of this integration on student pharmacists’ learning, confidence and competence will also be discussed.

(Speaker) Michelle Blakely, University of Wyoming

4:30 p.m.–4:40 p.m.

Strategies to Combat Inequities Leading to Faculty Burnout

This session will discuss evidence-based inequities that lead to burnout in healthcare faculty, particularly pharmacists, and highlight the culpability of academic institutions in regard to establishing reasonable expectations and supportive work cultures. Lastly, the session will address strategies to minimize burnout in the academic setting.

(Speaker) Patricia Darbishire, Purdue University

4:40 p.m.–4:50 p.m.

Yes We Can! Implementing Accommodations in the Experiential Setting to Provide Equitable Learning Opportunities

This session will highlight effective strategies that colleges and schools of pharmacy can utilize to support learners with disabilities by implementing appropriate learning accommodations in the experiential setting. Efforts to support these students are essential for the provision of equitable learning opportunities and requires collaboration amongst various stakeholders in the educational process.

(Speaker) Janel Soucie, University of Florida

4:50 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Q&A with Microsession Speakers

4:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

An Interprofessional Clinic Without Walls: Transforming a Schizophrenia Simulation Activity to Telehealth

Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that requires pharmacotherapy and an interprofessional team approach. However, pharmacy students do not often get opportunities to understand such mental health challenges in the classroom nor how they can collaborate with allied health professionals through expanding telehealth models. This session describes the transformation of an interprofessional education (IPE) event with occupational therapy students to virtual delivery by using Zoom technology and standardized patients portraying first-episode schizophrenia.

(Speaker) Abir El-Alfy, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Kevin Bozymski, Medical College of Wisconsin

4:35 p.m.–5:05 p.m.

Future Pharmacists Under Construction—Laying the Foundation in the Classroom with Clinical Practice Guidelines

Pharmacy students must build a solid understanding of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in order to practice evidence-based medicine. CPGs have high cognitive load requirements, and students often lack the skills necessary to navigate the data presented. Best practices regarding when and how to train students in this area are not well established. This session will challenge participants to develop creative strategies that support student success for understanding and applying CPGs in class and in practice.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the impact of developing and implementing a clinical practice guideline (CPG) skill development activity for pharmacy students.
  2. Develop a plan to create, implement, and assess the impact of a CPG skill development activity on student performance.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-071-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) McKenzie Grinalds, Cedarville University; (Speaker) Alexandra Hintz, Cedarville University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Burnout to Breakdown to Breakthrough

It is well established that pharmacy faculty are at risk of burnout, especially emotional exhaustion. Session participants will explore the process of resisting and recovering from burnout, utilizing methods from the book Burnout: Breaking the Stress Cycle. Attendees will identify a desired target area to break through, and will participate in guided discussions to develop personal, practical action steps to implement.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify methods to prevent and resolve symptoms of burnout and emotional exhaustion.
  2. Describe methods to process the physiological effects of stress and to manage time, energy, and workload.
  3. Develop a specific action plan to take steps to move from coping to thriving in pharmacy academia.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-072-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Andrea Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Lisa Meny, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Michael Fulford, The University of Georgia

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Coaching in Pharmacy Education: Are You My Mentor, Advisor, Teacher, Preceptor, or Coach?

Coaching has long been successfully utilized in sports, music, leadership and business, with a recent expansion into academia and medical education. It has been described as “unlocking a person’s potential to maximize their own performance.” This presentation is designed to explore current practices and recommendations for medical coaching and provide a forum to discuss strategies for implementation in pharmacy education.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Differentiate the types of professional relationships educators may function in.
  2. Explore the advantages and challenges to employing coaching in pharmacy education.
  3. Propose opportunities for implementation of coaching in schools of pharmacy.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-073-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Elina Delgado, William Carey University; (Speaker) Ashley Hawthorne, William Carey University; (Speaker) Justina Lipscomb, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Sarah Kubes, The University of Texas at Austin; (Moderator) Michael Gonyeau, Northeastern University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Daring to Teach the Whole Truth: Structural Racism, Structural Competence and Health Inequities

This session describes how educators can prepare students to address health inequities in practice by being structurally competent and not just culturally competent. The experience of educators who have successfully incorporated history, structural racism and implicit bias in their classrooms will be shared. Attendees will be provided with practical examples of how they can teach various contemporary topics in the curriculum through a health equity lens.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast structural competency and cultural competency.
  2. Describe how structural racism and structural competency can be incorporated into the curriculum in schools of pharmacy.
  3. Identify curricular opportunities where health inequities in patients can be mitigated by addressing how the subject matter is taught in the curriculum.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-074-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Hope Campbell, Belmont University; (Speaker) Lakesha Butler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Edgar Diaz-Cruz, Belmont University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Brick by Brick: Strategies for Building and Maintaining Momentum in your Educational Scholarship

Do you feel overwhelmed when thinking about educational scholarship given how long and complex the inquiry process can be? Have you wondered about strategies to make it more manageable, especially when working in teams? Project management principles offer ways to streamline your scholarship, keep track of progress, and increase the likelihood of success. This session will discuss navigating the challenges of educational scholarship through project management, including tools and techniques that may be helpful.

(Moderator) Spencer Harpe, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Spencer Harpe, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Kristin Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Daniel Malcom, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Robin Zavod, Midwestern University

5:15 p.m.–5:45 p.m.

Use of Advance Organizers in Integrated Teaching

To promote meaningful learning and aid in information retrieval, we will discuss advanced organizers in our session. We will demonstrate the use of flowcharts to summarize the management of acute cardiovascular diseases by combining pharmacological concepts with evidence-based pharmacotherapeutic decision-making. These concepts are represented in one flowchart, promoting an integrated approach to learning. Flowcharts, as advanced organizers, can present content in an organizational format that promotes retrieval and are a valuable teaching and learning tool.

(Speaker) Anthony Zimmermann, Western New England University; (Speaker) Diptiman Bose, Western New England University

5:50 p.m.–6:20 p.m.

Student Writing Club: An Opportunity to Promote Student Publication

Are your students looking for opportunities for publication? This program will share descriptions of four schools of pharmacy in Wisconsin who have student writing clubs partnered with the state pharmacy journal. The writing clubs allow students the opportunity to complete professional writing in a non-competitive peer review process to publish a narrative review. Attendees will leave this session with tools to implement similar programs in their state or province.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the rationale for promoting student publication within a Doctor of Pharmacy program.
  2. Describe possible structures and partnerships of a student writing club to improve opportunities for student publication.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-075-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Amanda Margolis, University of Wisconsin–Madison; (Speaker) Michael Nagy, Medical College of Wisconsin

Wednesday, July 21

9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session II

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting platform.

(Moderator) David Holdford, Virginia Commonwealth University

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Be All That You Can Be: Do's and Don'ts of Being a Mentee

Mentorship is a key element to successfully navigating academia and the promotion and tenure process; however, cultivating and developing these relationships is not always intuitive. This session aims to highlight how to be a successful mentee and help mentees leverage mentorship pairings to maximize benefits for both parties. Mentees from various institutions will share perspectives to provide peer insight into navigating mentorship, providing best practices to employ and pitfalls to avoid in the process.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize the importance of mentorship.
  2. Describe best practices for and barriers to being a successful mentee.
  3. Develop a SMART goal on how to utilize a mentorship experience more effectively.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-076-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kristin Janzen, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Emmeline Tran, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Christina Seeger, Texas A&M University; (Speaker) Nitesh Kunda, St. John's University; (Speaker) Ryan Owens, Wingate University

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Incorporating Cultural Intelligence into Doctor of Pharmacy Class Sessions, Courses, and Curricula: Introducing a Framework

The session will discuss the need for incorporating cultural intelligence training in Pharm.D. curricula. The development of the Cultural Intelligence Framework will be shared with participants along with relevant examples of how the framework was used to identify cultural intelligence at the class, course, and curriculum level. In addition, ways to identify areas of opportunity for including cultural intelligence training by using the framework will be discussed.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the Cultural Intelligence Framework and engage in discussion regarding the incorporation of cultural intelligence in pharmacy education.
  2. Use the Cultural Intelligence Framework to identify where and how cultural intelligence is incorporated into a class session, course, or Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-077-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Lana Minshew, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Diana Lee, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Is There Anybody Out There? Games You Can Use to Engage Online Learners

Do you lecture into a webcam and wonder if anyone is paying attention? Are students sitting at their computers just playing games? Use that! Actively engage learners with games that are not only fun, but teach and spark interest. Learn how to create an online escape room! Lead a virtual scavenger hunt! Create non-trivial trivia games! Faculty from three institutions will teach you how to integrate games into your remotely-delivered content.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe resources used to create serious games built for pharmacy content.
  2. Discuss ways to incorporate gamification into a pharmacy course.
  3. Discuss the opportunities and challenges of adapting an in-person game to the online environment.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-078-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Emily Gorman, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Jason Guy, University of Findlay; (Speaker) Gary Theilman, The University of Mississippi

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Recruiting and Supporting Students in Community Pharmacy Research During COVID-19

Community pharmacy research opportunities for students can be challenging to come by across pharmacy programs. Adjusting to the virtual curriculums during the COVID-19 pandemic raises additional challenges. This presentation compares methods for recruiting and supporting students who are interested in community pharmacy research across five pharmacy programs.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe current efforts among five pharmacy programs for recruiting and supporting students who are interested in community pharmacy research.
  2. Identify barriers that students encounter that impact student success in their research endeavors.
  3. Discuss strategies to evaluate effectiveness of programs targeting students’ success.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-079-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Huy Hoang, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Tyler Kiles, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Michelle Sahr, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Ashley Moody, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Laura Knockel, The University of Iowa

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Teaching Pharmacy Students Resource Allocation Ethics in a Courageous New World

Global society is experiencing a catastrophic “wake up” call across all elements of human relationships, governance and economics. Resource allocation and distribution of health care technologies (e.g., vaccines, medications) are critical knowledge and skills for pharmacists now and into the future. This program will discuss the history and implementation of these concepts in classroom and experiential education settings. Presenter and audience discussion will be used to identify best practices for education moving into the future.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define the concept of “resource allocation” and its historical development.
  2. Give three (3) examples of resource allocation in health care delivery.
  3. Formulate three (3) elements for classroom discussion of resource allocation.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-080-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Chair) Suzanne Larson, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Diane Ginsburg, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) James Ruble, The University of Utah

10:35 a.m.–11:05 a.m.

Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment: Experience with a Faculty Development Series

Inclusive teaching practices are instrumental in creating and maintaining a learning environment where all participants are fully engaged and respected. These practices support meaningful and accessible learning, and shape the best experiences for learners and educators. However, many pharmacy faculty lack formal training in identifying and implementing inclusive learning practices within their teaching environment. This session will describe the approach that one institution took in developing faculty to effectively recognize and embody inclusive learning practices.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe inclusive learning examples and evidence supporting these strategies.
  2. Identify approaches to designing and implementing faculty development sessions on creating inclusive learning environments.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-081-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kathryn Morbitzer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Suzanne Harris, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Chalmers and Weaver Awards Presentation

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

“Us vs. Them:” Exploring Viewpoint Diversity and Mitigating the Ramifications of Polarization

In the current culture wars, divisions run rampant across demographic and political lines. Several factors contribute to polarization, including echo chambers, fear of dissension, and an “us vs. them” mentality. This session will describe 1) the current polarized landscape, 2) how our psychology and the role of echo chambers contribute to polarization, and 3) how to foster viewpoint diversity to overcome polarization.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the current landscape of academia from polarization and viewpoint diversity perspectives.
  2. Discuss how human psychology and echo chambers contribute to polarization.
  3. Create and implement strategies to foster viewpoint diversity in colleges and schools of pharmacy.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-082-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Jonathan Thigpen, Samford University; (Speaker) Vibhuti Amirfar, St. John's University; (Speaker) Rick Shweder, University of Chicago

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Are We Ready for Kids? Training and Assessing Students to Provide Culturally Responsive Pediatric Care

Pharmacists care for patients across the lifespan, including children. Integral to the delivery of quality patient care is the understanding and appreciation of the role cultural values and beliefs have on patient outcomes for all patients. Working with pediatric patients requires one to also consider: age, cognitive and emotional development, and family dynamics. In this session, pharmacy practice faculty and lab instructors will explore and discuss how to longitudinally integrate culturally appropriate pediatric cases.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify elements of ACPE Guidelines that pertain to graduates' ability to provide population-based care.
  2. Summarize key considerations when developing a unit of instruction designed to improve graduates' knowledge and skills in providing culturally appropriate care to the pediatric population.
  3. Outline steps faculty can take to enhance existing instructional methodologies by incorporating communication techniques and skills to better address the needs of special populations.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-083-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Nicholas Fusco, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Monica Miller, Purdue University; (Speaker) Sally Arif, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Imbi Drame, Howard University; (Speaker) Jacqueline Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Better Together: Supporting Pharmaceutical Care Skills Through Interprofessional Activities

Many schools of pharmacy have embedded Interprofessional Education (IPE) activities within their Skills Labs to ensure graduates are prepared to work as a member of an interprofessional team. This session will describe a variety of in-person and collaborative online IPE offerings embedded within Skills Labs curricula that support the development of pharmaceutical care skills and overall course goals and objectives. Resources and the need for continuous quality assessment of IPE activities will also be discussed.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate an IPE activity and corresponding learning objectives for its ability to contribute to Skills Lab course-level goals and objectives.
  2. Discuss a variety of in-person and collaborative online IPE learning activities embedded within Skills Lab curricula that focus on the development of pharmaceutical care skills.
  3. Compare innovative approaches to securing IPE activity resources, including facilitators and assessors.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-084-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Chair) Lucio Volino, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; (Speaker) Susanne Barnett, University of Wisconsin–Madison; (Speaker) Casey Gallimore, University of Wisconsin–Madison; (Speaker) Kimberley Begley, Creighton University; (Speaker) Jared Van Hooser, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Lead Now! Strategies to Combat Organizational Disconnect and Distancing

In times of stress and change, an organization can develop a distance and disconnect between faculty, staff, and the administration. While faculty and staff are serving as the frontlines for the program and interfacing with students to carry out the operations, the administration is doing its part to help keep the program moving forward. Here, we describe strategies to connect better with colleagues, regardless of your position, academic rank, or role within the organization.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the elements and symptoms of organizational disconnect and distance.
  2. Compare and contrast the vantage points of various stakeholders in organizations facing organizational disconnect and distance.
  3. Develop a strategy for building an infrastructure supporting mentorship, engaging in effective leadership and management, and engaging in talent development.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-085-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) David Fuentes, Academic Consulting Services; (Speaker) Brooke Griffin, Midwestern University

11:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Staying in Touch – Strategies to Reach Students in Need

A multifaceted approach can identify students with negative well-being who may be hesitant to seek help and access campus resources. With a pandemic and changes in curricular delivery, the need to identify students with increased anxiety and/or stress and provide support is a top priority. This program is geared toward academic and student affairs faculty/staff, and discusses a combined academic/student affairs approach to identify at-risk students and promote a supportive, nonjudgmental culture to provide assistance.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe a collaborative, proactive action plan to identify students with negative well-being in a pharmacy program using a student affairs and academic approach.
  2. Develop individual organizational strategies to identify students with increased anxiety and/or stress using student affairs and academic services.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-086-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Dawn Havrda, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Chasity Shelton, The University of Tennessee

11:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Training Pharmacy Students to Deliver Bad News Using the SPIKES Model

Pharmacists are often involved in delivering “bad news” to patients. Poor communication skills in delivering distressing news may lead to patient misunderstanding of disease, treatment, and reduced quality of care. This session will describe the implementation of a counseling model developed to deliver bad news, “SPIKES model”, within a pharmacy skills course. Attendees interested in learning about the counseling model, its application and effectiveness are encouraged to attend.

(Speaker) Suzanne Galal, University of the Pacific; (Speaker) Deepti Vyas, University of the Pacific

11:50 a.m.–12:20 p.m.

Mission Accepted: Integration of Biostatistics, Research Design, and Pharmacoepidemiology With Pharmacotherapy

Critical appraisal and application of drug therapy literature, a key educational outcome per the 2016 ACPE standards, requires integration of biostatistics, research design, pharmacoepidemiology, and pharmacotherapy. Owing to inherent content differences, these topics are traditionally taught as separate courses. However, this siloed approach is a challenge to pharmacy educators because it may be less effective in helping students integrate these topics. This session addresses this challenge by describing principles and strategies to integrate these topics.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe principles and strategies of designing and implementing a curriculum that integrates biostatistics, research design, and pharmacoepidemiology with pharmacotherapy.
  2. Design a plan for integration of biostatistics, research design, and pharmacoepidemiology with pharmacotherapy at your institution.

knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-087-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jaekyu Shin, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Trang Trinh, University of California, San Francisco

11:50 a.m.–12:20 p.m.

Why Grading and Entrustable Professional Activity Feedback Should be Separated in Experiential Learning

Experiential educational success relies on accurate feedback to improve student learning. A challenge with providing accurate feedback is separating it from the final grade. Separation can be difficult when preceptors use rubrics to work backwards by checking boxes until the desired grade appears. In this process, the grade defines the performance and construes the learner feedback. During this session, we will walk through separating feedback on Entrustable Professional Activities from the grade in experiential learning.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the rationale for separating feedback on EPAs from a summative assessment of experiential performance.
  2. Describe the process for separating feedback on EPAs from a summative assessment of experiential performance.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-088-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Adam Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Kathryn Fuller, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

12:15 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

Meet the AJPE Editors

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education? Do you have a question about AJPE? Connect and meet with the editors and staff of AJPE.

(Speaker) Gayle Brazeau, Marshall University

12:15 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

Screen Break/Mindfulness Activity

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Closing the Equity Gap: Innovative Global Public Health Strategies for Reducing Disparities

Based on the CDC, cultural competence is defined as the: “integration and transformation of knowledge about individuals and a groups of people into specific standards, policies, settings to increase the quality of services; thereby producing better outcomes.” Given the current public health pandemic, a “Think Tank” was established from the AACP Global Education, Health Disparities, and Public Health SIGs for “Closing the Health Disparities Gap by Implementing Innovative Global Public Health Models.”

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss various platforms for educating pharmacy students on the needs of the underserved patient population
  2. Identify methods for engaging academicians, practitioners, fellows, residents, and student pharmacists in community outreach programs that address health disparities both domestically and abroad.
  3. Share key areas for advocacy in advancing pharmacy practice and expanding the role of pharmacists in public health.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-089-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Chair) Sheila Seed, MCPHS University; (Moderator) Sheila Seed, MCPHS University; (Speaker) Abby Kahaleh, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Sharon Connor, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Imbi Drame, Howard University; (Speaker) Jennifer Bhuiyan, St. John's University

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

First Things First: Successful Strategies for Transitioning into a New Leadership Position

Structures and systems used to integrate employees into new roles must be evaluated at organizational levels to ensure new leaders understand the culture and environment, form positive bonds with colleagues, and initiate productive connections with direct reports. Failure to routinely assess and modernize these efforts can lead to burnout, decreased engagement and poor outcome achievements. New and current leaders will benefit from this discussion on internal and external support systems in leadership transitions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the benefits and challenges of both internal and external leadership transitions.
  2. Identify support mechanisms and resources to acclimate leaders to their new role based on the nature of their transition.
  3. Describe strategies and techniques for successfully navigating career changes and leadership transitions.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-090-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Lalita Prasad-Reddy, Chicago State University; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, Chicago State University; (Speaker) David Fuentes, Academic Consulting Services; (Speaker) Marc Fleming, University of North Texas; (Speaker) Kristin Robinson, Howard University

12:45 p.m.–1:15 p.m.

Take Action! Using the Hexagon Tool to Successfully Implement Integrated Curricula

Pharmacy schools have been charged by the ACPE standards, CAPE outcomes, and literature to achieve curricular integration. These resources emphasize a need for integrated pharmacy curricula but lack direct guidance on what integration means and how it is implemented. Is your institution ready for integration? What resources are needed to succeed? This session will aid faculty in identifying gaps and support the development of an individualized plan for curricular integration using implementation science.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the use of five implementation science stages and the National Implementation Research Network’s Hexagon Tool to help guide operationalization of curricular integration at their institution.
  2. Evaluate elements of curricular integration within their institution using the National Implementation Research Network’s Hexagon Tool and Implementation Science.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-091-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Amber Frick, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Faustina Thanh-Lan Hahn, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Tearing Down Age-Old Barriers: Empowering Students to Break Down Barriers to Provide Exemplary Geriatric Care

The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic cast a spotlight on unique barriers to optimal care for vulnerable elders, while bringing a host of new and previously underrecognized challenges. Effective solutions will require development and implementation of innovative educational strategies in the didactic, laboratory, and experiential settings to ensure that care is continuously monitored, measured, and adapted to meet goals. Pharmacists will leave this session with tools to implement these solutions in their practice.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss educational strategies to equip and empower students to identify and dismantle barriers of care for older adults.
  2. Implement the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process to teach adaptable patient-centered and holistic care plans.
  3. Collaborate with fellow pharmacists to develop practical clinical solutions to optimize the care of older adults.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-092-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Kimberly Nealy, Wingate University; (Speaker) Tara Storjohann, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Elizabeth Pogge, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Michael Nagy, Medical College of Wisconsin

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Microsessions: Virtual Assessment

12:45 p.m.–12:55 p.m.

Clinical Assessment 2.0: Assessing Patient-Centered and Interprofessional Skills in the Virtual World

Telemedicine has become the new standard of care in the pandemic world and training students to deliver quality patient care in a virtual setting is essential. This session will describe the transformation of a curricular capstone assessment activity of student clinical skills in patient and interprofessional interactions to a telemedicine setting on a virtual platform. Methods to maintain the integrity of the high-individual assessment in the new platform will be discussed.

(Speaker) Kristine Schonder, University of Pittsburgh

12:55 p.m.–1:05 p.m.

Dear Faculty: Utilizing Student Committees as a Formative Assessment Strategy

Research has shown that student focus groups are often a sound method for collecting formative feedback regarding teaching effectiveness and student learning. This session will summarize the Student Liaison Committee (SLC) process utilized at the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, which is a focus-group style formative evaluation process used to gather course and teaching feedback throughout the semester. The goal of this session to promote the use of students as partners in formative assessment.

(Speaker) Brianna Henson, University of Kentucky

1:05 p.m.–1:15 p.m.

Hello, I Cannot Hear You!! Evaluating a Telehealth Patient Counseling Encounter with Complex Care Needs

This session will provide an overview of a telehealth encounter where students were assessed on counseling a patient with complex care needs (e.g., difficulty hearing, dexterity problems, etc.) who was prescribed a new medical device (e.g., inhaler, insulin, BP, glucometer, etc.) through the remote environment. Strategies for successfully conducting skills-based assessments online will be discussed.

(Speaker) Mariette Sourial, Palm Beach Atlantic University

1:15 p.m.–1:25 p.m.

Making the Transition to Virtual Skills-Based Objective Structured Clinical Examinations: Strategies for Effective Implementation

This session will review pedagogical pearls when transitioning individually assessed skills-based Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) from a live face-to-face offering to a synchronous virtual format. Comparison of student performance data will be reviewed between 2019 (face-to-face) and 2020 (virtual) course offerings for a third year Internal Medicine elective. Results showed no statistical difference in student performance on such OSCEs, individually or overall. Qualitative data included student perceptions of this format with students reporting continuity of effective, timely, and meaningful assessment.

(Speaker) Jaclyn Cole, University of South Florida

1:25 p.m.–1:35 p.m.

Pedagogy Versus Pandemic: Evaluating Practice-Readiness on Virtual Rotations

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic demonstrated that emergency scenarios occur unexpectedly and that pharmacy educators must adapt quickly to novel learning environments. An inherent challenge of remote rotations is designing a student experience that provides opportunities for students to demonstrate and assess practice-readiness with achievement of the core entrustable professional activities (EPAs), especially EPAs in the Patient Provider and Interprofessional Team Member domains. This can be achieved by providing a combination of fictional scenarios and real-life remote participation in the Pharmacist Patient Care Process.

(Speaker) Samantha Moore, St. John's University

1:35 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Q&A with Microsession Speakers

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Open Hearing of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee.

Open Hearing of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee.

(Moderator) W. Thomas Smith, Manchester University

1:20 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Staying the Course: Preventing Curricular Drift Through a Course Quality Review Process

Integrated curricula require cross-course communication to ensure continued alignment. A continuous, systematic course review process provides a formalized approach to maintain quality and prevent curricular drift. This session will provide an overview of a multi-faceted approach to course quality review implemented at the University of Florida. The approach focuses on inter- and intra-course quality improvements. Participants will learn key elements of the process and strategies to address common recommendations for course improvements and alignment.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Outline key elements of a course quality review process for an integrated curriculum.
  2. Adapt strategies that maintain course integration for incorporation into the course quality review process at your institution.

( 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Karen Whalen, University of Florida; (Speaker) Michelle Farland, University of Florida

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Emergency Preparedness and Health Promotion for Pharmacists in the Era of Global Pandemics

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought into focus the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including (SDG3) for global health and (SDG17) for partnerships. Pharmacists have a crucial role in emergency preparedness and health promotion. The session will highlight participants’ roles in SDGs, provide professional development in emergency preparedness and response, and equip them with the constructs of the Health Belief Model (HBM) to promote public uptake of vaccines for COVID-19 and other emerging infectious diseases.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Outline how pharmacists can positively impact the outcomes of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals 3 & 17 (global health and partnerships).
  2. Utilize the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) model to promote and engage pharmacist's training in emergency preparedness and response and highlight areas of incorporation of same in the Pharm.D. curriculum.
  3. Apply the constructs of the Health Belief Model to develop health education materials to promote the public’s uptake of vaccines for COVID-19 and other emerging infectious diseases.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-093-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Joyce Addo-Atuah, Touro College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Abby Kahaleh, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Hoai-An Truong, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

No Waiver Required: What Pharmacists Need to Know About Buprenorphine for Opioid Use Disorder Treatment

This session will convey foundational knowledge regarding buprenorphine, an effective but frequently misunderstood treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD), and the pharmacist’s role in its accessibility and use. Presenters will share insights regarding didactic, experiential, and continuing education focused on buprenorphine for OUD. Participants will prepare for integration of this content within their curricula through facilitated small group discussion. The target audience includes (1) didactic instructors who teach in psychiatric modules and (2) experiential preceptors.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the basics of buprenorphine as an effective treatment for opioid use disorder and emerging roles for pharmacists.
  2. Describe successful examples of buprenorphine focused education and clinical service activities in didactic, experiential, and continuing education.
  3. Develop a plan to integrate buprenorphine related education into the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-094-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Chair & Moderator) Daniel Ventricelli, University of the Sciences; (Chair & Speaker) Lucas Hill, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Hannah Johnson, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Samantha Odem, William Carey University; (Speaker) Amy Werremeyer, North Dakota State University

2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Text Analytics—Rise Above the Word Clouds

If you are in education, then you have large amounts of text and limited time. Fortunately, text analytics tools are becoming more user-friendly and widely available. We will present several applications of text analytics from our own work and others. Examples will include using word trees, topic modeling, sentiment analysis and more. Text analytics can be utilized for identifying at-risk students, providing more efficient feedback, quickly identifying themes, and more.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe various types of text analytics being used in education.
  2. Identify how text analytics could be used in the participant’s learning environment or answer the participant’s research questions.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-095-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kayley Lyons, Monash University; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

The AACP Policy on Honors, Awards and Leadership Positions

AACP's Policy on Honors, Awards and Leadership Positions states that AACP retains the right to defer or decline to grant honors or positions, or to revoke or suspend those already granted, if AACP determines that it is in the best interests of the field to do so. The rationale, underlying ethical considerations and implementation procedures related to the policy will be reviewed, particularly in the context of harassing and discriminatory behavior by awardees.

(Moderator & Speaker) Russell Melchert, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Speaker) Bradley Cannon, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker) Robin Zavod, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Karen J. Kopacek, University of Wisconsin–Madison

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

ACT Pharmacy Collaborative Task Force: Review of Curriculum and Experiential Education Frameworks

This open forum will provide the Academia-CPESN Transformative (ACT) Pharmacy Collaborative Task Force the opportunity to share a draft framework for Community Pharmacy integration in the curriculum and experiential education at colleges and schools of pharmacy. The session will have the opportunity for participants to share feedback and suggestions regarding the draft frameworks.

(Moderator & Speaker) Melissa McGivney, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Nicholas Leon, Thomas Jefferson College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Megan Smith, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Christopher Daly, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Focusing on Students’ Differences, Not Similarities: Are You a Culturally Responsive Teacher?

Pharmacy educators often don’t know how to leverage the growing cultural diversity of their classrooms to promote learning and connection with their students. Incorporating culturally responsive teaching (CRT) techniques allows for role modeling of cultural humility and promotion of intercultural training. This session will present literature emphasizing methods to implement CRT across the curricula and present institutional strategies that can be implemented to promote intercultural development of faculty and preceptors.

(Chair) Sally Arif, Midwestern University; (Moderator) Sally Arif, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Sally Arif, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Nicole Winston, Augusta University; (Speaker) L'Aurelle Johnson, University of Minnesota

2:35 p.m.–3:05 p.m.

Clinical Reasoning: What if APPE Students Are Missing the Mark and We Don’t Know It?

Clinical reasoning is important to develop in student pharmacists, but faculty may struggle with how to identify students struggling with clinical reasoning early in an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience and implement strategies specifically targeted at developing a student's clinical reasoning. This presentation will outline the method for clinical reasoning assessment and a novel clinical reasoning activity used by preceptors at one health system.

(Speaker) Ginelle Bryant, Drake University; (Speaker) Eliza Dy-Boarman, Drake University

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Screen Break/Mindfulness Activity

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Can You Hear Me Now? A Class Activity About Interprofessional Communication and Micro/Macroaggressions in Healthcare

Communication problems and microaggressions occur frequently in healthcare among team members and even from patients. A virtual class activity was designed for 474 interprofessional students to have facilitated conversations about scenarios that presented communication conflicts and microaggressions emerging from provider-patient interactions and intra-team dynamics. The conflicts involved racial, ethnic, and gender disparities and stereotypes that sometimes affect healthcare teams. Design, implementation, and data collected from the activity involving 261 student responses will be presented.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain what microaggressions are and how they occur on the health care team.
  2. Describe the structure and assessment of a small group interprofessional activity to address communication conflicts on medical teams, and how to translate its use in their school.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-096-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Philip Rodgers, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Charlene Williams, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Collaborations to Optimize Prescription Pain Management

This session will showcase the experiences and strategies implemented during the 2019-2021 Optimal Prescribing in Pain Management (OPPM) Collaborative. The OPPM Collaborative, a two-year grant-based initiative funded by Cardinal Health Foundation, engaged state pharmacy associations and schools of pharmacy in partnerships that facilitated efforts by pharmacists to collaborate with other healthcare providers and patients in support of optimal medication use in pain management. Cardinal Health Foundation partnered with the National Alliance of State Pharmacy Associations (NASPA), AACP, and the Alliance for Integrated Medication Management (AIMM) to coordinate and facilitate this initiative. The initiative supported five state grantees between 2019 and 2021. The presentation will feature the grantees discussing the diverse set of programs, resources, and tools to achieve optimal prescribing for pain management.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Highlight the overall purpose, design and outcomes of the 2019-2021 OPPM Collaborative.
  2. Explore opportunities for schools of pharmacy and state pharmacy associations to partner in an effort to promote optimal prescribing in pain management.
  3. Identify strategies for optimal prescribing of opioids in pain management.
  4. Discuss opportunities for schools of pharmacy to take a leadership role for optimal prescribing in pain management.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-097-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Todd Sorensen, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Paul Scanlon, The Alliance for Integrated Medication Management; (Speaker) Aliyah Horton, Maryland Pharmacists Association Foundation, Inc.; (Speaker) Amy Tiemeier, Missouri Pharmacy Foundation; (Speaker) Erica Martin, Pharmacy Society of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Steven Martin, Ohio Northern University; (Speaker)Penny Shelton, North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association; (Speaker) Cheryl Viracola, The North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association Endowment Fund, Inc

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Making Gold from Lead: The Alchemy of Succeeding in Student-focused Scholarship

One of the most challenging aspects of being a faculty member is including pharmacy students in scholarship projects. This session examines programmatic initiatives and innovative strategies that promote student inclusion in scholarship and create mutually beneficial scholarship opportunities for students and faculty members. Elective courses, scholarship tracks, and a new Pharm.D./M.S. program will be outlined. Additionally, creative scholarship projects will be explained in detail, for example crafting publishable review papers during 4-6-week rotations.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify at least one programmatic strategy to implement at your home institution that will increase the involvement of pharmacy students in scholarship.
  2. List several ways that pharmacy students could assist you with your scholarship goals.
  3. Identify obstacles and develop solutions to include pharmacy students in your scholarship.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-098-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator & Speaker) Dan Berlau, Regis University; (Speaker) Tim Bloom, Shenandoah University; (Speaker) Pius Fasinu; Campbell University; (Speaker) Sigrid Roberts, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Brendan D. Stamper, Pacific University Oregon

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Peeling Back the Layers of Layered Learning in Experiential Education

Layered learning is an essential strategy in many experiential education programs to secure an adequate number of placements for required IPPE and APPE hours. However, experiential education directors often struggle with how to implement and foster layered learning within their programs. This session will provide participants with examples of successful layered experiential learning models from four colleges/schools of pharmacy. Furthermore, presenters will share how their layered learning models were adapted in response to the pandemic.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define layered learning as it relates to experiential activities.
  2. Describe 3 models for incorporating and summarizing strategies for preceptor development for implementing layered learning at experiential sites.
  3. Discuss successes and challenges of implementing and fostering layered learning models within experiential education programs.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-099-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Sheila M. Allen, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Marlowe Djuric Kachlic, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Julie Legg, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Mara Kieser, University of Wisconsin–Madison; (Speaker) Mary McGuiggan, University of Minnesota

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Yours Not Hours: Making CPD Personal

Though pharmacists are aware of the CPD model, many still employ an hours-based approach to continuing education. Additionally, there is less emphasis on personal development. This session will identify ways for the CPD model to be implemented in various settings and explore a personal development framework to achieve higher levels of work fulfillment. All those interested in supporting themselves, trainees, and colleagues in their personal and professional development are encouraged to join.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Apply the continuing professional development model to a variety of practice settings.
  2. Discuss the relationship between personal development and professional development.
  3. Utilize a personal development framework to address a work challenge.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-100-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Jennifer L. Baumgartner, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; (Speaker) Stephen A. Brown, Samford University; (Speaker) Caitlin Musgrave Mardis, University of South Carolina

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grant Award Microsessions

Recipients of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grants will share 10-minute summaries of their SOTL projects.

(Moderator) Ellen Woods, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education

Creating an Inclusive Climate Within Pharmacy Practice

(Speaker) Kathleen Adams, University of Connecticut

Comparison of Peers Versus Actors as Standardized Patients on OSCE Performance

(Speaker) Albert Bach, Chapman University

Preceptor Perspectives on EPA-based Assessment: A multi-School Study

(Speaker) Andrew Darley, University of Georgia

California Health Sciences, University), Interprofessional Dietary Coaching for Healthy Hearts in Underserved Communities

(Speaker) Farid Khalafalla, College of Pharmacy

Feedback for Clinical Reasoning: Closing the Gaps to Improve Efficiency and Quality

(Speaker) Denise Rhoney, University of North Carolina

Assessing the Use of Emotional Intelligence Training to Teach CAPE Outcomes

(Speaker) Holly Robison, Manchester University

Impact of Interprofessional Simulations on Performance in an Emergency Response

(Speaker) Amy Yanicak, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Chemistry Section: Progress Report from 2019-2020 New Investigator Award Recipients

Research seminar describing the progress of AACP New Investigator Award-supported projects.

(Chair) Giuseppe Gumina, Presbyterian College; (Speaker) Comfort Boateng, High Point University; (Speaker) Jace Jones, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Kalyan Nagulapalli Venkata, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis

4:05 p.m.–4:35 p.m.

Cross-Pollination: A Student-led, Integrated, Ambulatory Care APPE Experience

In this session, attendees will be oriented to a novel APPE experience that uses student-led case presentations to explore a variety of specialized ambulatory care settings. Cross-pollination is an application-based, student-led presentation aimed at exposing APPE students to diverse patient populations while increasing student self-efficacy and decreasing preceptor burden. APPE preceptors that are looking to engage their students in higher level patient discussions are highly encouraged to attend this session.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how to implement Cross-Pollination Experiences into an APPE rotation.
  2. Identify settings in which Cross-Pollination may be useful.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-101-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Michal Mingura, Marshall B. Ketchum University; (Speaker) Puja Patel, Marshall B. Ketchum University

4:45 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence Campaign and Screening of Vaccine Documentary, Followed by a Reception

This session will present details of the joint pharmacy campaign to promote confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine and to address vaccine hesitancy among specific populations. The session will provide a forum to share campaign and member activities to encourage all eligible people to get vaccinated.

(Moderator & Speaker) Stephanie Fouch, AACP

Thursday, July 22

9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session III

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting platform.

(Moderator) David Holdford, Virginia Commonwealth University

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Bridging the Gap: Two Strategies to Synergize Community Pharmacy IPPEs and Nonprescription Medications

This program will describe two methods of working with community rotation sites to provide an intentional self-care therapeutics experience. One approach involves the integration of the self-care therapeutics didactic curriculum into weekly community pharmacy IPPE assignments conducted concurrently over the spring semester of the first professional year. The second approach involves preparing students with didactic self-care instruction prior to the start of IPPE and collaborating with preceptors to incorporate self-care assignments into the IPPE rotations.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe teaching methods utilizing a synchronous community IPPE and didactic self-care therapeutics.
  2. Identify two strategies for preparing students to provide effective self-care of patients during IPPE rotations.
  3. Explain the impact of coordinating didactic and IPPE self-care learning on student and preceptor perceptions.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-102-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Rupal Mansukhani, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; (Speaker) Ryan S. Ades, Manchester University; (Speaker) Phillip Lawrence, Roseman University of Health Sciences

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Managing Change to Do You Good: Tools to Incorporate Change Management into Your Leadership Development

Equip yourself with the knowledge and skills needed to navigate the changes in our profession. Attendees will leave this session with an understanding of multiple change management tools and practical ways to incorporate them into their respective leadership development. Participants will collaborate to problem-solve scenarios on changes to curriculum and resource scarcity. Members from many roles (junior, mid-level/senior faculty, administration, clinical practice-based) desiring to adapt to a changing world will benefit from the conversation.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify change management tools or theories that would be applicable for changes in pharmacy education and practice.
  2. Design change management plans focused on a change at your institution.
  3. Identify key stakeholders to be involved with change management process at your institution.

Application-based (0581-0000-21-103-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Gregory M. Zumach, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Erin E. Miller, South Dakota State University; (Speaker) Andrew Traynor, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Noel Wilkin, The University of Mississippi

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Oversharing: Leveraging Social Media as a Well-Being Tool

While student well-being is an integral component of success in the pharmacy profession, initiatives often occur via live co-curricular or extracurricular activities, which may result in limited attendance due to busy schedules and non-school commitments. This session will demonstrate how any faculty or staff member within a school of pharmacy can use social media accounts to promote well-being in a virtual, asynchronous platform for students, faculty, and staff.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-104-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Ryan E. Owens, Wingate University; (Speaker) Shawn R. Taylor, Wingate University

10:35 a.m.–11:05 a.m.

Staying Close While Distancing: Strategies for Enhancing Global Partnerships in the Virtual Environment

Global partnerships between schools and colleges of pharmacy offer important opportunities for collaboration in research, education and practice. These partnerships support accreditation requirements and recruitment into graduate programs. During the COVID-19 pandemic, international travel was restricted, and schools were left with limited opportunities for international engagement. During this session, participants will examine how three tested strategies for creating interactive international educational experiences can be implemented or adapted for their own institutions.

(Speaker) Rory Kim, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Ian S. Haworth, University of Southern California

11:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Combating Zoom-Fatigue and Other Wellness Strategies: A Comprehensive Approach to COVID-19 Curriculum Adaptation and Beyond

This presentation will describe the University of Maryland’s comprehensive Pharm.D. curriculum approach to support students and faculty during the COVID-19 pandemic. Speakers will discuss (1) how the entire delivery of the curriculum was modified to limit synchronous hours, scheduled at regular times, (2) the embedding of dedicated Instructional Design experts to each and every course to ensure valuable asynchronous activities, and (3) constant engagement with all stakeholders to assess and modify approaches based on feedback.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the impact of “Zoom-fatigue” on student learning.
  2. Utilize a student-centered approach to structure both individual courses and the entire curriculum to minimize Zoom-fatigue and ensure an optimal learning environment.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-105-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Shannon Tucker, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Andrew Coop, University of Maryland

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Microsessions: Virtual Deliver

11:15 a.m.–11:25 a.m.

Leveraging Technology to Deliver a Hospital-Based Professional Skills Course

Creating a hospital-based skills course can be challenging in the remote learning environment. Hospital-based skills courses require several hands-on applications such as aseptic technique, quality improvement techniques such as conducting a root cause analysis and querying an electronic health record (EHR), order entry and verification, communication with other healthcare providers, discharge counseling, and medication reconciliation. This microsession will demonstrate how to leverage technology to provide hands-on active learning opportunities simulating these hospital-based activities.

(Speaker) Deepti Vyas, University of the Pacific

11:25 a.m.–11:35 p.m.

Putting the Precepting Village Together to Help Rotations Go On Despite Virtually Any Challenge

Considering the rotation cancellations at several of our college’s affiliated clinical sites, a shared precepting team of four faculty members created a six-week ambulatory care clinical APPE rotation. The rotation accommodated four students per block in which students completed three weeks of an HIV clinic rotation, and three weeks of a virtual rotation which involved daily check ins, online reflections, virtually attending diabetes clinic visits led by a pharmacist/faculty member via WebEx, projects, case presentations, and leadership development activities. This presentation will review how this team was developed, a description of the ambulatory care sites involved, and how the team adjusted the rotation to meet the needs of the students, the college, the clinics, and the shifts between live and virtual learning during the pandemic.

(Speaker) Kathleen Vest, Midwestern University

11:35 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Redefining Project DOCC: A Virtual IPE Collaboration Between Healthcare Providers and Parents

This presentation will describe the adaptation, planning, implementation and results of the Project Delivery of Chronic Care (DOCC) curriculum as a virtual interprofessional education event at one institution. A description of the 3.5 hour-long virtual interprofessional education opportunity for medical, pharmacy, physicians assistant, public health and nursing students and the four phases of: 1) pre-simulation; 2) pre-briefing; 3) parent interview; and 4) debriefing session will be shared. Results of baseline and post assessments will be described, including how learners’ concept of the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) changed as a result of the exercise.

(Speaker) Gina M. Baugh, West Virginia University

11:45 a.m.–11:55 a.m.

Shop Till You Drop: Shopping Virtual Pharmacy Aisles for Interactive Self-Care Patient Cases

Walking into a pharmacy aisle to assist a patient with an over-the-counter recommendation is a clinical skill students should feel comfortable performing on experimental rotations. Using interactive patient cases during a self-care module can develop this skill and increase confidence. With a quick shift to virtual education our self-care module had students utilize the pharmacist patient care process to shop virtual pharmacy aisles containing common over-the-counter medications to provide a recommendation to a simulated patient.

(Speaker) Danielle M. Kieck, PharmD, Assistant Professor, Wilkes University

11:55 a.m.–12:05 p.m.

Zooming Into Deep Learning of Epilepsy: Integrating the Science of Learning Into Education Technology

Most educators know what it’s like to ask students a question only to receive blank stares or now awkward silence on Zoom platforms with cameras off. We might remark “we just went over this yesterday” and feel exasperated by how quickly students seem to forget material. What is not working? Part of the problem may be that our instruction is not always firmly grounded in learning science which could result in students not retaining the desired information. Adding to this concern was the way the COVID-19 pandemic challenged us to think about our educational delivery and incorporate technology more than ever before. This presented a new opportunity to take advantage of the published literature on learning science and integrate it into our new technology assisted learning space. This program will describe an approach to making small changes that shows this integration into how pharmacology and pharmacotherapy of antiseizure drugs and epilepsy were taught during the pandemic.

(Speaker) Denise H. Rhoney, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

12:05 p.m.–12:15 p.m.

Q&A with Microsession Speakers

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

The Straight Dope: Ways to Incorporate Cannabis Science Into Pharmacy Curricula

As states continue to expand access to medical and non-medical use of cannabis, pharmacists are increasingly called upon to counsel patients about the promise and dangers of cannabinoid products. Cannabis products are marketed for a panoply of medical uses that lack controlled clinical trials; pharmacists can feel unprepared to effectively counsel patients about the medical use of cannabis products. This session equips educators with creative ways to integrate cannabis science throughout the pharmaceutical science curriculum.

(Speaker) Christopher Cunningham, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Matthew Metcalf, MCPHS University; (Session Organizer) Giuseppe Gumina, Presbyterian College

11:50 a.m.–12:20 p.m.

A Model for Successful Faculty-Student Research Collaboration: You Can’t Go It Alone!

Research is fundamental for faculty promotion and documented research experience improves student competitiveness for residency and fellowship applications. Mentored student research is not only a win-win situation—such projects can result in transformational work that can improve the field of pharmacy and patient care. This could be you!

(Speaker) Amie Goodin, University of Florida.(Speaker) Scott M. Vouri, University of Florida

Noon-1:30 p.m.

American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE) Editorial Board Meeting

By invitation only.

(Moderator & Speaker) Gayle Brazeau, Marshall University; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky

12:30 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Screen Break/Mindfulness Activity

1:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Final House of Delegates Session

Final Session of the House of Delegates.

(Moderator) Bradley Cannon, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science

2:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Get out of Synch: Adapting Skills Sessions to an Asynchronous Format

During this session, we will review an innovative design of two remote asynchronous skills lab medication counseling sessions. We will discuss implementation strategies, outcomes of an asynchronous versus a synchronous session, student feedback, and lessons learned. Participants will have the opportunity to design their own asynchronous session for implementation at their institution.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages between remote synchronous and asynchronous sessions.
  2. Adapt a synchronous learning session into an asynchronous learning session.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-107-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Crystal Zhou, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Stephanie Hsia, University of California, San Francisco

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Strike Up the Band! Celebrating 200 Years of Pharmacy Education

2021 marks the bicentennial of the founding of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy (PCP), the first College of Pharmacy North America. As such, it is also a celebration of 200 years of pharmacy  education!  This program will provide a broad overview of the evolution of pharmacy education in the United States from its earliest days to modern times.  Special emphasis will be on the role that pharmacy educators have had on the development of our profession.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the evolution of pharmacy education in the United States from apprenticeship training to full time study of the sciences and profession in an academic setting. 
  2. Discuss the role of pharmacy education on the development and progress of the profession.
  3. Identify important “Firsts” for pharmacy education.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-21-106-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Chair and Moderator) Megan R. Undeberg, Washington State University; (Moderator) James Culhane, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Edward Foote, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) George Downs, University of the Sciences Philadelphia College of Pharmacy

3:20 p.m.–3:50 p.m.

Ever-Changing Mapping for an Ever-Changing World: Capitalizing on a Dynamic Curriculum Database

A dynamic curriculum database provides real-time reporting to identify shifts in curriculum content, sets the framework for curriculum integration within and across years, and advances curriculum development. This session will describe the evolvement of a database from tracking curricular content to enhancing rapid deployment of integrated courses as the curriculum shifted to remote opportunities during the pandemic. Participants will be challenged to explore the feasibility of implementing a dynamic curriculum database for their program.

(Speaker) Kristine S. Schonder, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Thomas Waters, University of Pittsburgh

4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Closing General Session: The How of Happiness: Boosting Well-Being Through Kindness, Gratitude, and Connection

During both normal times and challenging circumstances like today, most people around the world report wanting to be happy. Happiness not only feels good, however; it is good. Relative to their less happy peers, happy people are more creative, productive, and helpful; have more stable marriages and higher incomes:, and boast stronger immune systems. Fortunately, decades of research suggest that individuals can deliberately increase their own happiness by creating and maintaining new habits. In this talk, Dr. Lyubomirsky will introduce the “positive activity model,” which describes the “how” and “why” of happiness—that is, the conditions under which such practices as gratitude or kindness work “best” and how small and simple activities can transform people into happier, healthier, more connected, and more flourishing individuals.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. List two intentional activities that have been shown to increase happiness, and describe at least one study that supports the efficacy of each of these two activities.
  2. Describe three factors that moderate (or impact) the success of activities aimed at increasing happiness.
  3. Identify one empirical research example of how positive activities improve not only happiness but other areas of life.

(Keynote Speaker) Sonja Lyubomirsky, University of California, Riverside