Virtual Pharmacy Education 2020 Programming

Virtual Pharmacy Education 2020 - AACP Annual Meeting - July 13-31, 2020

All Annual Meeting programming will be recorded and available to view on-demand within our conference platform for up to one year.

Special Programming

Session times below are in Eastern Time (ET); however, within our conference platform Pathable, times will display in the user’s time zone.

AFO SIG Programming

Pre-registration required. Fee $50.

MONDAY, July 6 Noon-4:00 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program

The Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG program is designed for administrative and financial officers as well as other AACP participants interested in key administrative issues impacting the operations of colleges of pharmacies. As more and more Colleges of Pharmacies struggle with the current economic climate, many of us are exploring alternative revenue sources. At the annual meeting the SIG will host several sessions on current and new revenue sources with a particular focus on the administrative and financial aspects to consider.

THURSDAY, July 9 Noon-4:00 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program

The Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG program is designed for administrative and financial officers as well as other AACP participants interested in key administrative issues impacting the operations of colleges of pharmacies. As more and more Colleges of Pharmacies struggle with the current economic climate, many of us are exploring alternative revenue sources. At the annual meeting the SIG will host several sessions on current and new revenue sources with a particular focus on the administrative and financial aspects to consider.

Teachers Seminar Programming

Teachers Seminar: Inclusive Teaching: A Strategy to Reach ALL Learners

The Teacher Seminar will focus on identifying ways to be intentional and inclusive in your teaching. Inclusive teaching refers to a learning environment in which all students, regardless of background and personal characteristics, are provided the opportunity to meet their learning potential. To effectively do this, it is imperative that teachers have an in-depth understanding of themselves—their teaching style, motivation, emotional intelligence, grit, resilience, among others. 

Participants will be provided strategies to get to know themselves and their students, and how this knowledge collectively can contribute to an enhanced learning experience. Case-based scenarios will be discussed to allow application of strategies to different learning environments. Participants will be encouraged to utilize one or more of these strategies upon return to their institution and to take a scholarly approach to their inclusive teaching implementation.

Pre-registration required. Fee $99.

Monday, July 6

1:00 p.m.–2:05 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Keynote: Teaching for Equity and Inclusion

In this session we will engage in a broad discussion of inclusive pedagogy, the evidence for its importance, and strategies to teach for equity and inclusion. Using active approaches, participants will reflect on their role as educators and their teaching practices, who their students are and the experiences they bring to the classroom, and ways to create supportive learning experiences

(Speaker) Tomika L. Ferguson, Virginia Commonwealth University (Speaker) Adria Hoffman, Virginia Commonwealth University

1.00 Contact Hour

2:05 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Networking Break

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Strategies for Inclusive Teaching Across Learning Environments

During this session participants will be provided with multiple strategies for inclusive teaching as applied to a variety of learning environments, including individual teacher/learner interactions, small groups, and large classrooms. Inclusive learning principles such as multiple means of engagement, diversity of pedagogical approaches, and creating a safe learning environment for learners will be explored in the context of course design and content delivery.

(Speaker) Melissa J. Durham, University of Southern California

1.00 Contact Hour

3:15 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Networking Break

3:25 p.m.–4:10 p.m.

Defining Your Space and Place in Scholarship That Promotes Inclusive Teaching

As we experiment with inclusive teaching, approaches, delivery methods and assessment strategies will be implemented and refined. Participants in this workshop will discuss scholarly questions that are ripe for investigation within inclusive teaching practice. Next, participants will explore their interests, skills and circumstances to assist in defining a scholarly space within inclusive teaching that is inspiring and uniquely suited to them. Strategies for successful reporting of an initiative will also be included.

(Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota

0.75 Contact Hour

3:25 p.m.–4:10 p.m.

Inclusive Teaching Strategies in Large Classrooms

During this session participants will discuss case-based scenarios involving large classroom learning. Participants will strategize how to ensure inclusive teaching in either the creation or revision of a course or an individual session, and develop plans for implementing those strategies.

(Speaker) Melissa J. Durham, University of Southern California

0.75 Contact Hour

3:25 p.m.–4:10 p.m.

Inclusive Teaching Strategies in Small Groups and Team-Based Experiential Environments

This session will focus on the teaching and learning that takes place in a small group (around 6-10 students) and team-based experiential environments. How can faculty structure their instruction and the environment to optimize inclusivity? This task might seem easy to accomplish with a small number of students, but is it that straightforward? In this session, participants will discuss some principles of and ideas for inclusive teaching in a small-group and team-based experiential settings.

(Speaker) Judith L. DeLuca, Wilkes University

0.75 Contact Hour

3:25 p.m.–4:10 p.m.

The Value of Inclusive Teaching in Patient Education

Inflexible communication/education strategies and preconceptions about those with visible and/or invisible impairments can lead to unnecessary health disparities. The session will include a frank discussion about how the patient-provider relationship can be tainted quickly when misconceptions, assumptions and rigid communication strategies impair quality patient education. Improv activities that create “synaptic noise” to mimic deficits in the ability to meaningfully process information will be used as we explore both typical communication and inclusive teaching techniques to “educate” neurotypical individuals in impaired environments.

(Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

0.75 Contact Hour

4:10 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Networking Break

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Defining Your Space and Place in Scholarship That Promotes Inclusive Teaching

As we experiment with inclusive teaching, approaches, delivery methods and assessment strategies will be implemented and refined. Participants in this workshop will discuss scholarly questions that are ripe for investigation within inclusive teaching practice. Next, participants will explore their interests, skills and circumstances to assist in defining a scholarly space within inclusive teaching that is inspiring and uniquely suited to them. Strategies for successful reporting of an initiative will also be included.

(Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota

0.75 Contact Hour

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Inclusive Teaching Strategies in Large Classrooms

During this session participants will discuss case-based scenarios involving large classroom learning. Participants will strategize how to ensure inclusive teaching in either the creation or revision of a course or an individual session, and develop plans for implementing those strategies.

(Speaker) Melissa J. Durham, University of Southern California

0.75 Contact Hour

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Inclusive Teaching Strategies in Small Groups and Team-Based Experiential Environments

This session will focus on the teaching and learning that takes place in a small group (around 6 - 10 students) and team-based experiential environments. How can faculty structure their instruction and the environment to optimize inclusivity? This task might seem easy to accomplish with a small number of students, but is it that straight forward? In this session, participants will discuss some principles of and ideas for inclusive teaching in a small-group and team-based experiential settings.

(Speaker) Judith L. DeLuca, Wilkes University

0.75 Contact Hour

 

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

The Value of Inclusive Teaching in Patient Education

Inflexible communication/education strategies and preconceptions about those with visible and/or invisible impairments can lead to unnecessary health disparities. The session will include a frank discussion about how the patient-provider relationship can be tainted quickly when misconceptions, assumptions and rigid communication strategies impair quality patient education. Improv activities that create “synaptic noise” to mimic deficits in the ability to meaningfully process information will be used as we explore both typical communication and inclusive teaching techniques to “educate” neurotypical individuals in impaired environments.

(Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

0.75 Contact Hour

 

Tuesday, July 7

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Assessment for Equity and Learning

In this session we will discuss assessment strategies as opportunities to support equity in student learning and our own growth as educators. We will also discuss strategies that can be used to determine whether goals of inclusive teaching are being met.

(Speaker) Tomika L. Ferguson, Virginia Commonwealth University (Speaker) Adria Hoffman, Virginia Commonwealth University

1.00 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Networking Break

2:15 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Promoting Scholarship Within Your Inclusive Teaching Practice

Participants will discuss strategies to promote rigorous data collection, insightful analysis and strong writing related to inclusive teaching practices.  The session begins with discussion of student learning assessment options and program evaluation approaches.  Strategies for success in peer and editor review will also be discussed.

(Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota

0.75 Contact Hour

2:15 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Assessing Inclusive Teaching Strategies in the Large Classroom 

As a follow-up to the first breakout session on inclusive teaching in large groups, this session will challenge participants to think about ways to effectively assess whether the strategies they have implemented in the classroom have been effective. 

(Speaker) Melissa J. Durham, University of Southern California

0.75 Contact Hour

2:15 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Assessment of Inclusive Teaching Strategies in Small-Groups and Team-Based Experiential Environments 

As a follow-up to the first breakout session on inclusive teaching in small groups and team-based experiential settings, this session will challenge participants to think about ways to effectively assess whether the strategies they have implemented in the either the classroom or experiential setting have proven effective. 

(Speaker) Judith L. DeLuca, Wilkes University

0.75 Contact Hour

2:15 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

The Value of Inclusive Teaching in Patient Education

Inflexible communication/education strategies and preconceptions about those with visible and/or invisible impairments can lead to unnecessary health disparities. The session will include a frank discussion about how the patient-provider relationship can be tainted quickly when misconceptions, assumptions, and rigid communication strategies impair quality patient education. Improv activities that create “synaptic noise” to mimic deficits in the ability to meaningfully process information will be used as we explore both typical communication and inclusive teaching techniques to “educate” neurotypical individuals in impaired environments.

(Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

0.75 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Networking Break

3:15 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Promoting Scholarship Within Your Inclusive Teaching Practice

Participants will discuss strategies to promote rigorous data collection, insightful analysis and strong writing related to inclusive teaching practices.  The session begins with discussion of student learning assessment options and program evaluation approaches.  Strategies for success in peer and editor review will also be discussed.

(Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota

0.75 Contact Hour

3:15 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Assessing Inclusive Teaching Strategies in the Large Classroom 

As a follow-up to the first breakout session on inclusive teaching in large groups, this session will challenge participants to think about ways to effectively assess whether the strategies they have implemented in the classroom have been effective.  

(Speaker) Melissa J. Durham, University of Southern California

0.75 Contact Hour

3:15 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Assessment of Inclusive Teaching Strategies in Small-Groups and Team-Based Experiential Environments 

As a follow-up to the first breakout session on inclusive teaching in small groups and team-based experiential settings, this session will challenge participants to think about ways to effectively assess whether the strategies they have implemented in the either the classroom or experiential setting have proven effective. 

(Speaker) Judith L. DeLuca, Wilkes University

0.75 Contact Hour

3:15 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

The Value of Inclusive Teaching in Patient Education

Inflexible communication/education strategies and preconceptions about those with visible and/or invisible impairments can lead to unnecessary health disparities. The session will include a frank discussion about how the patient-provider relationship can be tainted quickly when misconceptions, assumptions and rigid communication strategies impair quality patient education. Improv activities that create “synaptic noise” to mimic deficits in the ability to meaningfully process information will be used as we explore both typical communication and inclusive teaching techniques to “educate” neurotypical individuals in impaired environments.

(Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

0.75 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Networking Break

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Summary and Wrap Up

Speakers will lead a discussion of themes of the day, answer questions from the audience and share suggestions of first and next steps in creating an inclusive teaching environment for students.

(Speaker) Tomika L. Ferguson, Virginia Commonwealth University (Speaker) Adria Hoffman, Virginia Commonwealth University

0.75 Contact Hour

General Meeting Programming

Session times below are in Eastern Time (ET); however, within our conference platform Pathable, times will display in the user’s time zone.

MONDAY, July 13 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Opening General Session: A Lawyer’s Prescription for Pharmacists’ Role in Achieving Health Equity

Racial, ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities in the United States are well documented but the causes are still poorly understood. This presentation will identify some causes that are uniquely within reach of pharmacists to address. Pharmacists and their educators are a vital and central key to defeating unjust and avoidable health disparities. Pharmacists are often the most accessible, trusted healthcare professional available to underserved patient populations. Moreover, pharmacists are often intimately familiar with the neighborhood, environmental and family contexts in which patients live, work and play. As educators that train the professionals who are proximate to vulnerable patient populations, faculty are uniquely positioned to reduce and even eradicate disparities in vaccine coverage, substance dependency, diabetes, asthma and more. The presentation will identify biases that stand in the way of solutions that could dramatically reduce health disparities in America, and conclude by suggesting that the members of AACP hold the key to the prescription for health equity.

(Speaker) Dayna Matthew, University of Virginia, School of Law

TBD

TUESDAY, July 14 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

First House of Delegates Session

All Annual Meeting attendees are welcome to come and hear reports from AACP leaders, including president Todd D. Sorensen's and incoming president Anne Y. Lin's remarks. Candidates for the office of President–elect will be introduced during the session and an initial report on the business before the House will be provided by the Bylaws & Policy Development Committee.

WEDNESDAY, July 15 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Networking Sessions: CEO Deans; Associate and Assistant Deans; Department Chairs

Three concurrent networking sessions hosted by the Council of Deans (COD) to discuss ideas, practices, and strategies employed by colleges and schools of pharmacy during the onset and initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic and how these will shape policies and procedures to restart the academic enterprise in the areas of research, teaching and facility planning. Due to the evolving nature of this public health crisis, the discussions held during these sessions may assist academic pharmacy for Fall 2020 planning and beyond. Each of the networking sessions will be moderated and will discuss areas of concern for following three groups: CEO Deans, Assistant/Associate Deans, and Department Chairs. There will be the opportunity for all three groups to come back together as a one large group to report out on the findings from each group. Each session will be recorded and available for meeting attendees.

(Moderator) Sidhartha D. Ray, Touro College of Pharmacy–New York; (Moderator) Steven C. Stoner, University of Missouri–Kansas City;  (Moderator) Wendy C. Cox, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Moderator) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University

THURSDAY, July 16 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Final House of Delegates Session

The final business of the 2020 House of Delegates will occur at this session.

FRIDAY, July 17 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Friday General Session: Driving Chronic Medication Management (CMM) Implementation: 10–Year Journey of Diffusion and Its Implications to Pharmacy Education and Training

Demand for clinical pharmacists in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has risen sharply and continues its upward trajectory. During this session, Dr. Anthony Morreale will share the advances in clinical pharmacy practice that have been seen in the past 10 years by the largest managed care provider in the U.S.: the VA. The VA’s approach to expanding clinical pharmacy programs through centralized processes involving gap analysis, standardization of practices, mentoring, consultative visits and education has been innovative and largely successful. Dr. Morreale will discuss the lessons learned from the VA focus of developing and expanding clinical pharmacy practices throughout the country and the implications for the future of pharmacy education and residencies.

(Speaker) Anthony P. Morreale, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

1.00 Contact Hour

MONDAY, July 20 Noon–1:00 p.m.

Science Plenary: The New Science of Wellness and What it Means for 21st Century Medicine

Healthcare is becoming more proactive and data–rich, with increasing focus on maintaining and enhancing wellness beyond just reacting to disease. The Institute of Systems Biology has assembled a data set of thousands of people who participated in a “scientific wellness” program integrating genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, microbiomes, clinical chemistries and wearable devices coupled with health coaching for behavior change. The resulting personal, dense, dynamic data (PD3) clouds (Price et al., Nature Biotechnology, 2017) provide a powerful platform for scientific discovery, where deep longitudinal data enables detection of the earliest transition states between wellness and disease. Dr. Nathan Price will discuss how the interpretation of these data led to actionable findings for individuals to improve health, reduce risk drivers of disease, understand how genetic risk manifests in the body throughout life (e.g., in Alzheimer’s disease) and show individual trajectories into disease (e.g., cancers). In addition, Dr. Price will describe what the data shows about healthy aging, how insights into human biology (e.g., microbiome–human metabolome connections, Wilmanski et al., Nature Biotechnology, 2019) can be drawn from the data and conclude with a big picture view of how this endeavor relates to the future of healthcare.

(Speaker) Nathan Price, Institute for Systems Biology

1.00 Contact Hour

Scheduled Programming
During these sessions, attendees will watch a pre-recorded video and have the opportunity to participate in a live Q&A with speakers during the session's scheduled time.

Monday, July 13

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Strengthening Global Health Experiences Through Interprofessional Collaboration

The use of competency frameworks and entrustable professional activities (EPAs) has the potential to improve learning outcomes and strengthen interprofessional collaboration for international experiential opportunities as demonstrated by a multi-institutional study on global health experiences. Participants will discuss how to tailor learning objectives utilizing different global health competency frameworks and will walk away with an individualized action plan for their program. The target audience includes faculty interested in developing and expanding global health activities.

(Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University; (Speaker) Ellen M. Schellhase, Purdue University; (Speaker) Jodie V. Malhotra, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Sarah A. Dascanio

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Make It V-Real: Incorporating Virtual and Augmented Reality Technologies into Pharm.D. Curriculum to Improve Content Delivery and Student Performance

Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) are innovative technologies enabling the overlay of digital information over a simulated (VR) or real world (AR). VR and AR are the evolution of 21st-century education. The target audience is faculty who want to be on the forefront of education innovation. Participants will learn how Howard University and Virginia Commonwealth University have used VR and AR in their curriculums to improve content delivery and enhance student performance.

(Chair) Toyin O. Tofade, Howard University; (Speaker) Simon S. Wang, Howard University; (Speaker) Salome B. Weaver, Howard University; (Speaker) Yolanda McKoy-Beach, Howard University; (Speaker) Lauren M. Caldas, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Dayanjan Wijesinghe, Virginia Commonwealth University

1.00 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Council of Deans (COD) Special Session: Planning for the Future of Pharmacy Education

This session will disseminate key findings from two investigations which can provide insight as to the future drivers of transformation for pharmacy education, research and practice: (1) The 2020 AACP Member Needs Survey that will contribute to the 2021-2024 AACP Strategic Plan and (2) The University of Southern California School of Pharmacy’s focused telephone interviews with 50 thought leaders from various sectors of healthcare, including healthcare technology companies, health services organizations, government and academia.

(Speaker) Vassilios Papadopoulos, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Terri S. Moore, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Team Teaching in an Integrated Curriculum: Learning How to Merge or Staying in Your Lane

Teaching in teams is becoming popular due to innovative curriculum integration strategies. Learning to plan and merge content, teaching styles and assessments of a teaching team can often be challenging and takes time to achieve. Successes and strategies of teaching as an interdisciplinary team will be discussed as faculty attendees learn from faculty and student perspectives associated with one school’s experience in addressing the challenges of team teaching in a fully integrated and courseless curriculum.

(Speaker) Bradley Wright, Auburn University; (Speaker) Lea S. Eiland, Auburn University

0.50 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Disability Diversity: How to Help All Learners Maximize Their Potential

Students of all abilities and backgrounds crave classrooms that are inclusive and convey respect. For those students with disabilities, the archetypal education setting may present certain challenges that require accommodation and consideration. This presentation will provide active learning experiences that enhance understanding of various disabilities and outline some common characteristics of each disability. Participants will discern strategies to enhance the teaching and precepting of learners with disabilities and unearth ways to optimize student learning.

(Speaker) Justina Lipscomb, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Elina Delgado, William Carey University; (Speaker) Sarah E. Kubes, The University of Texas at Austin

1.00 Contact Hour

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Well-being in the Pharmacy Curriculum: An Elective for Students by Students

Help! Students are stressed but don’t participate in well-being events! Colleges of pharmacy are focusing on well-being efforts, but what works for one student may not work for another, and some students may not see the value in offerings. What if there was a better way to infuse well-being into the curriculum? Session attendees will learn about an innovative well-being elective course design and walk away with scalable approaches to implementing well-being interventions or courses.

(Speaker) Meredith L. Howard, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Marian Gaviola, University of North Texas Health Science Center

0.50 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Teaching Therapeutic Reasoning—From Models to Mastery

Therapeutic reasoning remains a cornerstone of pharmacy education. Since the “standing room only” AACP session in 2019, the field of health professions education has produced promising advances on this topic. Our international team will present the latest models from our systematic literature review and our empirical studies across a spectrum of learners in several award-winning course designs. Participants will leave with ideas for their own learning environments, teaching, and research. Future collaborations will be encouraged.

(Speaker) Kayley M. Lyons; (Moderator) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) Conan MacDougall, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Katherine Gruenberg, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Denise H. Rhoney, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1.00 Contact Hour

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Utilizing YouTube to Deliver Pharmacist Counseling Information for Prescription and Non-Prescription Medicines

This session will describe utilizing YouTube as a novel educational approach for the delivery of pharmacist counseling information for 150 commonly prescribed medications and 45 non-prescription products. Student-pharmacists filmed, directed and produced all educational videos. Since January 2018, the channel has recorded over 1.5 million views from patients around the world. Comprehensive channel analytics and the process for video and channel creation will be discussed. Faculty, administrators and staff interested in innovative educational models are invited.

(Speaker) Seth D. Heldenbrand, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

0.50 Contact Hour

Tuesday, July 14

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Workload Modeling and Management Across Diverse Programs: More Than Just Teaching Hours!

Fulfilment in work is essential for our wellness, but equitably balancing needs of a department with individual faculty interests can be challenging. Rational workload modeling can help garner trust, create stability and prevent faculty burnout. This session will explore approaches to workload modeling and management, across each academic pillar (i.e., teaching, service, scholarship and clinical practice), at diverse pharmacy programs with a goal that participants can bring tangible solutions to challenges faced at their institutions.

(Speaker) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) Caitlin Gibson, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Laura H. Waite, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Angela K. Nagel, St. John Fisher College

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Advancing Practice Transformation Through Implementation Science

Implementation science provides rigorous and reproducible tools and techniques that pharmacy faculty can apply to their education, practice and research. Effective application of implementation science at schools can accelerate efforts in practice and curricular transformation, assuring fidelity and reliable assessment approaches. Growing capacity for implementation research represents an opportunity for pharmacy schools to expand the scope and impact of their faculty’s scholarship.

(Speaker) Jennifer Bacci, University of Washington; (Speaker) Margie Snyder, Purdue University; (Speaker) Carrie Martin Blanchard, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

1.00 Contact Hours

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Are You Working Harder Than You Should? Engaging Faculty and Preceptors in Assessment Using Technology

The University of Southern California has developed new approaches to conducting peer observation in the classroom and assessing its experiential programs through AARDVARC (Automated Approach to Reviewing and Developing Valuable Assessment Resources for your Curriculum). We will demonstrate how institutions can conduct peer teaching observation efficiently and how coverage of EPAs and disease states can be assessed using technology. Target audience: Faculty and administrators responsible for curriculum, assessment, faculty development and experiential programs.

(Speaker) Ian S. Haworth, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Ying Wang, University of Southern California; (Moderator) Maryann Wu, University of Southern California

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Taking the Reins in Describing the Impact of Your Educational Scholarship

When describing educational scholarship, faculty can report the same common metrics (e.g., grants, publications) or they can use more context-rich methods of explaining direction, contributions and impact. This session will introduce methods for representing your scholarly contributions in education, its breadth and its effects. Examples will include Specific Contribution Statements, Area of Inquiry Graphics, Impact Stories, and “The ELM Tool.” Presenters will discuss using these methods to demonstrate scope, depth and influence of scholarly work.

(Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Simon P. Albon, The University of British Columbia; (Speaker) Janet H. Cooley, The University of Arizona

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Unlocking the Potential: Case-writing Tips and Strategies for Multiple Mini-Interviews

In the Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI), candidates rotate through a series of short interviews, responding to a case-based scenario. This interview technique is appealing because of the focus on non-academic constructs and the reduction in bias. However, the quality of the MMI model hinges largely on the quality of the scenarios used. This session will focus on tips and strategies for writing MMI cases based on the literature and the speakers’ previous experience.

(Speaker) Wendy C. Cox, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

0.50 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Learning Analytics—A Glimpse Into the Future of Teaching and Learning

Learning analytics is an emerging discipline that has profound potential applications in pharmacy education. We will explore several topics in learning analytics including creating models to predict student outcomes, dashboards, data visualizations, providing personalized feedback at scale and adaptive learning support. During this session, you will learn about the latest trends in learning analytics and hear about work we are doing that might be useful for your own learning environments.

(Speaker) Kayley M. Lyons; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jason Brunner, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Kathryn A. Fuller, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1.00 Contact Hour

Wednesday, July 15

11:00 a.m.–Noon

America’s Next Top Scholar: Using Altmetrics to Boost Your Impact Factor

Is your h-index bringing you down? Add to your impact with alternative metrics (“altmetrics”). Learn how to harness metrics such as media mentions, engagement on Twitter, and references in patents and policy documents to enhance your promotion and tenure applications, and to strengthen faculty and institutional visibility. We will also discuss challenges and limitations with using altmetrics compared to traditional measures such as citation counts. Designed for all audiences regardless of familiarity with the topic.

(Speaker) Emily F. Gorman, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Andrew Coop, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Hilary M. Jasmin, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Nancy Borja-Hart, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Michael P. Veve, The University of Tennessee

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

How Pharmacy Students Can Adjust Their Mindset to Adopt Beneficial Habits

In order to achieve success in a Pharm.D. program and subsequent career it is of utmost importance that students adopt healthy habits. The formation of good habits begins with a shift in mindset. Faculty members are in a good position to teach and encourage this shift for the formation of healthy habits. This session will provide an introduction on understanding habits in the brain and provide recommendations for faculty to help their students.

(Speaker) Kim D. Tanzer, Western New England University; (Speaker) Tracy K Pettinger, Idaho State University

1.00 Contact Hour

12:30 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Utilizing a Novel Collaborative Educational Model to Enhance Experiential Training

Pharmacy educators will learn how one college created and implemented an acute care medicine collaborative teaching model to enhance student learning during advanced pharmacy practice experiences. This presentation outlines the overall design of the model including utilization of technology and strategic use of student activities. The intentional structure of the model incorporated activities including themed video modules, interprofessional discussion, progressive cases, literature evaluation and formal presentations.

(Speaker) Mary A. Worthington, Samford University; (Speaker) Jeffrey A. Kyle, Samford University

0.50 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Best Practices for Developing Effective AACP Mentoring Programs and Relationships for Pharmacy Faculty

The session is targeted to current and future pharmacy faculty. Best practices in developing a mentoring program will be presented including the varied mentoring programs available through AACP. Then two mentor/mentee groups, one each from the Women Faculty SIG and Biological Sciences Section mentoring programs, will speak about their approaches and successes. The session will end with an audience activity to identify mentoring needs and mechanisms to seek out mentors, followed by a group discussion.

(Chair) Shannon Kinney, Western New England University; (Speaker) Lea S. Eiland, Auburn University; (Speaker) Diane M. Calinski, Manchester University; (Speaker) Manas Mandal, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Jaclyn Novatt, Long Island University; (Speaker) Laura M. Borgelt, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Kamila A. Dell, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Susan E. Smith, The University of Georgia

1.00 Contact Hour

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Pursuit of APPEness: A Characterization of APPE Readiness by Faculty, Preceptors and Students

APPE readiness is an important, yet undefined concept. Academic performance is often the primary measurement of APPE readiness. However, personal and relational characteristics are equally important. Without a comprehensive understanding of this construct, students may be inadequately assessed and supported for APPEs. This session will define APPE readiness, informed by a qualitative study of students, preceptors, and faculty. Using this definition, curricular interventions and assessments aimed at supporting APPE readiness will be discussed.

(Speaker) Katherine Gruenberg, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Stephanie L Hsia, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Valerie B. Clinard, University of California, San Francisco

0.50 Contact Hour

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Beyond Biostats: Integrating Literature Analysis and Practical Application Early and Often

Schools of pharmacy include literature evaluation in their curriculum to meet ACPE standards; however, ensuring students are proficient is challenging. This session will describe how one school of pharmacy integrated evidenced based principles throughout the first three years of a fully integrated curriculum. Instructional methods for delivering foundational knowledge, practical application and demonstrating competency will be explained. Innovated assessment methods will be shared including holding students accountable for journal analysis activities in large group settings.

(Speaker) Lori B. Hornsby, Auburn University; (Speaker) Jessica Starr, Auburn University

0.50 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Choose Your Own Adventure: Innovative Approach to Enhancing Student Clinical Decision-Making in Anticoagulation Management

This session highlights opportunities and challenges of incorporating an innovative active learning activity into a lecture setting to achieve CAPE outcomes in patient-centered care, medication use systems management, problem solving and communication. This session will focus on the implementation of a Choose Your Own Adventure (CYOA) activity in a 3rd year course and lessons learned after three years of delivery. This session is intended for clinical faculty, and learners considering a career in academia.

(Speaker) Sharmon P. Osae, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Anne Misher, The University of Georgia

Thursday, July 16

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Design Your Next Leadership-Based Program or Scholarly Initiative: A Leadership “Think Tank” and Networking Session

Attendees will leave this session with a specific plan for a novel, cross-institutional Collaborative Leadership Initiative Plan (CLIP) that is either curricular, co-curricular or scholarly. Facilitated networking and Leadership Think Tanks will enable attendees to rapidly identify common interests related to Leadership Development and form cross-institutional collaborations. Faculty, administrators and staff desiring to create a new leadership program at their institution, or produce collaborative scholarly deliverables based on existing leadership programs should attend this session.

(Speaker) Kerry K. Fierke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Gregory M. Zumach, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, University of Florida; (Speaker) Edward Portillo, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Whitney D. Maxwell, University of South Carolina

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Moving Beyond USNWR: Is it Time for a New Rating System for Colleges of Pharmacy?

More than 22,000 pharmacists and others have signed a petition calling for reform of pharmacy school accreditation. Concerns about the oversupply of pharmacists and competence of recent graduates has spurred calls for greater transparency of the quality and value of pharmacy schools. Are we prepared to lead the way toward better transparency of quality and value in Pharm.D. education? How can we create a system for evaluating pharmacy schools that is useful to applicants and employers?

(Moderator) Benjamin D. Aronson, Ohio Northern University; (Speaker) David Nau, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Terri L. Warholak, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Vibhuti Amirfar, St. John's University

12:30 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Sink or SwIm: Supplemental Instruction (SI) in Pharmacy Education

Supplemental Instruction (SI) seeks to support students in difficult courses utilizing peer-leaders. The Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy offers SI in two formats—face-to-face and virtual—for selected courses. This session will describe both models and share perspectives and viewpoints regarding SI from faculty, students and peer-leaders. Participants will have the opportunity to share their SI experiences; solutions will be brainstormed for the top challenges and results shared via Pathable.

(Moderator) Susan L. Mercer, Lipscomb University; (Moderator) Kayce Gill, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Steve Phipps, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Sarah Collier, Lipscomb University

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

“But We’ve Always Had Two Midterms and a Final!” Rethinking the Student Exam Experience

Are you a pharmacy educator wondering if there are better approaches to assess student learning besides two midterms and a final in every course? This session will present a coordinated exam structure among three foundational medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics and pharmacy practice courses, outside of a block curriculum model, intended to reduce student exam burden and enhance the student experience. Speakers will share their experience with the structure and highlight key implementation and assessment considerations.

(Speaker) Curtis G. Jefferson, University of Washington; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Bacci, University of Washington

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

The Curious Case of Curiosity in Student Pharmacists: What It Is and Why It Matters

What motivates us to continue to learn? This session will discuss the concept of epistemic curiosity and lifelong learning. In addition to discussion underlying literature regarding curiosity and learning, speakers will present the results of their study exploring the current types of curiosity within student pharmacists at three institutions. This session will provide background for faculty and administrators, as well as an opportunity for brainstorming the use of curiosity measures in various areas of academia.

(Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Emily K. Frederick, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Christopher Johnson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Free Your Mind! Incorporation of Daily Mindfulness Into Your Course to Enhance Student Well-Being

New initiatives have been developed recently among schools of pharmacy focused on student wellness, largely as co-curricular or elective experiences which may be difficult to include all students or fit into a full curriculum. We will discuss how any faculty member teaching in the didactic curriculum can incorporate 5-minute daily mindfulness into any course to enhance student well-being. A variety of mindfulness practices will be showcased to determine which may work best for your classroom.

(Speaker) Ryan E. Owens, Wingate University; (Speaker) Shawn R. Taylor, Wingate University

0.50 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

“Bugs and Biodrugs:” Incorporating Emerging Biological Sciences Topics Into the Pharmacy Curriculum

Emerging topics in the biological sciences that impact pharmacy and pharmacy education are presented. This session explores evidence supporting use of the microbiome in the treatment of human disease. The session also addresses the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of inflammatory autoimmune diseases and cancer. Participants of the session will gain understanding of new and highly relevant topics in the biological sciences and ideas about how to incorporate these topics into teaching.

(Moderator) Diane M. Calinski, Manchester University; (Speaker) Abby Weldon, William Carey University; (Speaker) Jessica L. Johnson, William Carey University; (Speaker) Manas Mandal, Roseman University of Health Sciences

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Evolving Systematic Course Review: Beyond Logistics to Continuous Quality Improvement

Formal systematic course review remains a challenge in higher education, especially at the professional education level. Institutional culture, multiple/competing demands on faculty time, content competitiveness, disparate views on academic freedom, student engagement and reluctance for change can undermine effective course review for quality improvement. This program is designed to share success strategies and elicit respect and creative problem solving across different types of institutions to foster collaborative and sustainable continuous quality improvement in course review.

(Moderator and Speaker) Fadi M. Alkhateeb, Qatar University; (Speaker) Maria M. Mantione, St. John's University; (Speaker) Timothy V. Nguyen, Long Island University; (Speaker) Brittany M. Schmidt, South College

Friday, July 17

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Get to Know Yourself: Novel Tools to Enhance Student Self-Awareness

As schools and colleges of pharmacy continue to look for ways to enhance self-awareness, a variety of tools are available that offer unique insight into one’s self. Further, these tools can provide insight into how individuals approach team dynamics, collaboration, and leadership. This session offers attendees an overview of the evidence for such tools, strengths and limitations of popular options, and the opportunity to consider which tools best meet the needs of their institution.

(Speaker) Jacqueline M Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Kyle Turner, The University of Utah

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Development of a Longitudinal Skills Blueprint for Pharmacy Education

Creating a cohesive comprehensive skills assessment program can be challenging. How should our expectations of students change as they progress through the curriculum? Should the expectations be similar between schools/colleges of pharmacy? This session for both novice and experienced faculty will discuss the approach skills faculty from five different institutions took to begin developing a longitudinal skills blueprint. Presenters will also address how EPAs tie into longitudinal skills assessment.

(Speaker) Kali M. VanLangen, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Carrie Vogler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Jeanne E. Frenzel, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Laura E. Knockel, The University of Iowa

1.00 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

“All for One and One for All” The PPCP Musketeers

How do you contribute to a student being able to answer a preceptor’s question? Does your discipline matter? The PPCP provides a consistent message to patients and healthcare teams about what pharmacists do and encompasses all disciplines. Using a mock video preceptor-student discussion, this session will model how practice, foundational and social-administrative disciplines contribute to student preparedness to be a team-ready, practice-ready pharmacist. Participants will develop actionable plans for expanding PPCP throughout the entire curriculum.

(Speaker) Aleda M. Chen, Cedarville University; (Speaker) Margarita V. DiVall, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Michael J. Gonyeau, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Mary E. Kiersma, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; (Speaker) Jeannine M. Conway, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Teresa A. O'Sullivan, University of Washington; (Moderator) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Keeping Students Engaged in Learning: The Development of an Innovative Board Game

This session will explore how games can be developed and tailored to meet the educational needs of healthcare professionals from student to new practitioner to seasoned expert. Iter Vitae, translated as the Journey of Life, is a board game developed to strengthen disease state management skills with a focus on the patient experience. The game follows seven characters through their health journey where they encounter new diagnoses, disease progression, health/personal setbacks and medication related issues.

(Speaker) Elizabeth K. Pogge, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Lindsay E. Davis, Midwestern University/Glendale

0.50 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

We Have to Talk: Using Simulation to Teach Students How to Handle Difficult Conversations

Successfully navigating difficult conversations can be challenging, whether with patients, colleagues or employees. Using simulation to teach communication skills creates a safe environment for students to apply these skills in difficult situations. This session shares the approaches that three institutions have used to prepare students for difficult conversations through simulation. Techniques to debrief and provide feedback to the students will also be discussed. Target audience members are instructors within communication or skills-based courses.

(Speaker) David E Matthews, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Kristine Parbuoni, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Sun Lee, High Point University; (Speaker) Shaina Musco, High Point University; (Speaker) Courtney L. Bradley, High Point University

1.00 Contact Hour

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

“Attitude Drives Altitude“ Developing an Effective Tracking and Mentoring Process for Professional Behavior

Professionalism is an attitude. Attitude can drive student’s future altitude. In the academic setting what is the proper way to promote and foster professional behavior while holding students accountable for professional lapses? CAPE 2013 Domain 4 Standard focuses on personal and professional development, however navigating the process is challenging. This program will discuss tracking, mentoring and guiding students who struggle with professional behaviors and/or soft skills through a newly developed Professionalism Advisement Plan.

(Speaker) Robin M. Li, University of Florida; (Speaker) Shannon Miller, University of Florida

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Scaffolding and Safety Nets! Identifying and Supporting Struggling Students in the Didactic and Experiential Curriculum

Students enter Pharm.D. education with varying backgrounds and levels of academic preparedness. Movement toward more holistic admissions must now be accompanied by varied and diverse support systems to scaffold and promote student success. Adjusting to the classroom, to practice settings, working with preceptors and patients, raise additional challenges. Here, we share strategies for helping students at risk for struggling academically and professionally at three pharmacy programs.

(Speaker) Rosemary Sanchez, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Mary E Solis, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) C. Leiana Oswald, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Huy T. Hoang, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Heroes in Training: A Marvel It Will Be!

Legislative change may feel like an Infinity War, especially when it comes to policies on substance use disorders. This session will describe an innovative and interprofessional approach for training health professional students to become advocates for harm reduction strategies. The program invites all students, residents, and faculty to not only attend the session, but also become an Avenger to end the war on drugs.

(Speaker) Roshni P. Emmons, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Amber King, Thomas Jefferson University

0.50 Contact Hour

 

Saturday, July 18

10:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Virtual Pharmacy School Fair

AACP will host a Virtual Pharmacy School Fair on Saturday, July 18, from 10:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m. ET. Schools of pharmacy have until Friday, July 10, to register to participate in this event. This event is FREE for all prospective student to attend. Students who register will automatically be entered into a drawing for a $50 Amazon Gift Card! Please help us promote this event by tagging @Pharm4Me and using #VirtualPharmacySchoolFair in your social media. https://www.careereco.com/Fair/EventDetails?fairId=9179abac-0a7f-4289-b9e1-ab9900ee9a02

Monday, July 20

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Wait, You’re Implementing a New Curriculum Too?!? Perspectives From Across the Country

With numerous schools actively implementing or planning to launch a new curriculum, we have stories to tell and lessons to share. Ten programs from across the country will share strategies around leadership, implementation, coordination, use of technology and faculty development. Various perspectives for student learning support and effective use of assessment data will be discussed. Faculty, administrators, and staff attendees will interact personally with programs and leave with ideas to apply at their home institutions.

(Speaker) Janet H. Cooley, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Lea S. Eiland, Auburn University; (Speaker) Stephanie L Hsia, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Timothy V. Nguyen, Long Island University; (Speaker) John (Jay) L. Martello, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Conrad Dhing, Husson University; (Speaker) Matthew M. Lacroix, The University of Rhode Island; (Speaker) Emily Eddy, Ohio Northern University

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Remediation: Experiential Education Early Intervention Strategies

Unfortunately, not everyone shines on APPEs. A variety of surveillance and early intervention strategies may be used to identify at-risk of failure students during the pre-APPE curriculum and during APPEs. Examples include longitudinal pre-APPE readiness courses, APPE “bootcamps,” and preceptor coaching by experiential faculty. Using case vignettes, presenters will guide audience members to customize early intervention strategies from a programmatic level, experiential level and individual preceptor level to implement at their home institutions.

(Speaker) Meredith L. Howard, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Marian Gaviola, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Lisa J. Killam-Worrall, University of North Texas Health Science Center

1.00 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Finding your Best “Yes” for Success and Well-being: A Guide for Faculty in Clinical Practice

One way to mitigate burnout is by engaging in activities that ignite your passion. Faculty from all career stages will discuss how you can empower yourself and others to find the right “yes” (and appropriate “no”) while balancing the need to develop as a clinician, educator, and scholar. This session will help clinical faculty find strategies to manage clinical practice and find the best “yes” to attain personal and professional success and well-being.

(Moderator) Jill S. Borchert, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Nancy Borja-Hart, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Meagan A.M. Brown, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Anisa Fornoff, Drake University; (Speaker) Michael J. Gonyeau, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Susan E. Smith, The University of Georgia

1.00 Contact Hour

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Critical Thinking Reflections: Am I Applying the Standards and Virtues of a Critical Thinker?

The application of critical thinking standards, such as depth, breadth, clarity and relevance, helps to achieve high quality thinking. The cultivation of critical thinking virtues, such as intellectual courage, humility and empathy fosters growth as a critical thinker. In this mini-session, faculty of all disciplines will discover how questions drawn from the standards and virtues can be utilized by students to self-reflect on the quality of their critical thinking as they work through complex problems.

(Speaker) William C. Mobley, University of Florida

0.50 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

The G.A.M.E. of Life: Academic Pharmacy Edition

To have a successful career, pharmacy faculty must focus their time and energy on specific goals and skillfully navigate career transitions. At the 2019 AACP Annual Meeting presenters shared “How to Survive and Thrive in Academia” and introduced the Goal Achievement Matrix Exercise (G.A.M.E.). During this session presenters will guide the audience through their own personal G.A.M.E. in an interactive experience based on the Game of Life™ board game.

(Speaker) Lisa M. Meny, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Katie Smith, University of Georgia

1.00 Contact Hour

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Developing and Implementing a Competency-Based Clinical Pharmacogenomics Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE)

Pharmacists are the primary healthcare providers responsible for implementing pharmacogenomics to optimize patient care. Pharmacogenomics APPEs train student pharmacists to apply knowledge and skills in this area, but many preceptors lack experience teaching clinical pharmacogenomics. This session will review pharmacogenomics competencies put forth by various pharmacy organizations and describe clinical teaching and learning activities at University of Florida that ensures student pharmacists meet practice-based competencies in clinical pharmacogenomics and are prepared to implement pharmacogenomics in patient care.

(Speaker) Kristin W. Wiisanen, University of Florida; (Speaker) Emily J. Cicali, University of Florida

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

A Diagnosis of Exclusion…Defining Professionalism and Integrity: Strategies for Addressing Student Behavior and Mindsets

Effectively managing student conduct and professionalism issues can be complicated. Programs strive to instill a professionalism mindset in students and a culture of professionalism across institutions. Consistent, fair and appropriate response to allegations of misconduct utilize standardized methodologies for investigations, hearings, and appeals. This workshop examines the professionalism and misconduct policies, procedures and educational strategies of four Pharm.D. programs and the positive impact that these approaches have on the state of professionalism in their programs.

(Speaker) Rocke DeMark, Chapman University; (Speaker) Amy Diepenbrock, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Jeremy A. Hughes, California Health Sciences University

1.00 Contact Hour

Tuesday, July 21

11:00 a.m.–Noon .

Developing a Prescriber’s Mindset for Advanced Pharmacist Roles and Interprofessional Teaming

As the role of the pharmacist continues to evolve from dispensing to independent and delegated prescribing, opportunities exist to shift pharmacy education to ensure students are confident and practice-ready to prescribe. The presenters will describe curricular modifications at four institutions utilized to hone clinical decision-making skills, instill a prescriber mindset, and to utilize evidence from other health professions who have experienced similar practice transformation. Target audience includes faculty teaching clinical decision-making and scope-of-practice regulation.

(Speaker) Julie Akers, Washington State University; (Speaker) Jeremy A. Hughes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Angela K. Nagel, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Kristin Robinson, Florida A&M University

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Work Smarter Not Harder—Instructional Design and Project Management Principles for Course Managers

The expansion of team-taught integrated courses in pharmacy curricula has introduced challenges for course management. A course leader may need to align faculty from multiple departments with different priorities. Instructional design and project management principles offer unique solutions for course design which could make management and delivery of content easier for everyone. In this interactive session, three institutions will present their experiences and participants will develop an instructional design plan for delivering their own courses.

(Speaker) Julie S. Thomas; (Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, University of Florida; (Speaker) Stormi Gale, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Zachary Noel, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Stephanie L. Sibicky, Northeastern University

1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Academic Success Sessions for P1 Students

This session will describe the implementation of five mandatory academic success sessions for P1 students. The sessions were offered during the first eight weeks of the fall quarter. Topics included sleep and distractions, study strategies, student counseling, introduction to learning centers and being engaged learners. Incorporation of university partners in the sessions will be highlighted. Session outcomes will be shared based on student feedback. Changes planned for the next academic year will be discussed.

(Speaker) Janeen S. Winnike, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker) Lauren B. Angelo, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science

0.50 Contact Hour

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Effective and Low-Cost Simulation: Teaching Drug Utilization Review (DUR) with Minimal Financial and Faculty Burden

Drug utilization review (DUR) skills are essential to pharmacists across various settings, therefore educators must effectively build student confidence and competence in becoming medication problem solvers. This session will offer a solution to teaching DUR skills with an innovative, low resource burden, active learning activity that provides personalized feedback to students. Experiences will be shared regarding activity implementation at three institutions to prompt discussion about extrapolating innovative choose-your-own-adventure learning activities to other core curricular content.

(Speaker) Apryl N. Anderson, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Lauren M. Caldas, Virginia Commonwealth University

0.50 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Academia-CPESN Transformation (ACT) Pharmacy Collaborative: Aspects Pertaining to Research, Scholarship and Curriculum

The ACT Pharmacy Collaborative is an operational learning and ACTing collaborative between schools of pharmacy and established clinically integrated networks of community-based pharmacies to support the transformation of community-based pharmacy practice from a product-based care model to a community-based pharmacy care delivery model. The program will discuss the research and scholarship aspects as well as the curriculum perspective for faculty members and student pharmacists at colleges/schools of pharmacy.

(Moderator) Nidhi Gandhi, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Megan G. Smith, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Stefanie P. Ferreri, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1.00 Contact Hour

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

9-birds, 1-stone: A Year-long Project Promoting Professionalism, Advocacy, Leadership, Communication, Collaboration, Self-Awareness, Problem-Solving and Innovation

We will discuss an innovative approach to personal and professional development. First-year students work in small groups on a year-long project. The project includes a written paper, completion of a deliverable and a final presentation. Additional skills of team dynamics, self-awareness and giving feedback are integrated within this experience. Assessment of teamwork and communication skills are used. This project promotes advocacy, leadership, communication, collaboration, self-awareness, problem-solving and innovation during the earliest stages of professional development.

(Speaker) Judith L. DeLuca, Wilkes University; (Speaker) Kimberly A. Ference, Wilkes University

0.50 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Simulation vs. Gaming: Choosing a Strategy to Activate Your Classroom

What is game-based learning and how does that differ from simulation? While both active learning strategies are available to pharmacy educators, the pros and cons may not be applicable to every classroom situation. During this session, participants will explore game-based learning and simulation, including very basic to more complex activities and will have the opportunity to brainstorm new active learning activities for their classroom using one of these strategies.

(Speaker) Andrea L. Porter, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Rebecca Schoen, Duquesne University

0.50 Contact Hour

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

A GPS for Curricular Mapping: Revisiting the Path to Achieving Student Competency

While most faculty are aware of various constructs for assessing the outcomes of pharmacy curricula, a competency-driven curriculum presents unique challenges. This session will help faculty involved with curricular design and assessment develop an innovative way to individualize assessment of student activities that map back to Entrustable Professional Activities (EPA), in order to demonstrate student achievement of desired ACPE competencies and CAPE outcomes.

(Speaker) Karleen Melody, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Laura H. Waite, University of the Sciences

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

P&T: Ten Steps to Successfully Navigate Promotion and Tenure

Promotion and/or tenure are generally expected of all faculty in pharmacy education. However, junior faculty in particular are often left to seek mentorship to navigate the promotion/tenure process as there is only limited published literature to provide guidance. This session will discuss 10 key steps to navigate the promotion and tenure process with perspectives from teaching-focused as well as research-focused institutions with applicability to both pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical science faculty.

(Speaker) Velliyur Viswesh, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Karen Hassell, West Coast University; (Speaker) Brian L. Erstad, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Leanne Coyne, The University of Texas at Tyler

1.00 Contact Hour

Wednesday, July 22

11:00 a.m.–Noon

The Final Missing Piece in the Well-being Puzzle: What Leadership Can Do

Many presentations and seminars pertaining to well-being have historically focused on how individuals can make lifestyle changes to improve their well-being. However, the importance of organizational management principles and widespread initiatives to improve well-being from the institutional perspective is often overlooked. This session will focus on how institution leaders can implement strategies that minimize exhaustion and increase engagement among faculty and staff, as well as tools to reduce student pharmacist stress and anxiety.

(Speaker) Jaclyn Boyle, Northeast Ohio Medical University; (Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Dale E. English, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Mate Soric, Northeast Ohio Medical University; (Speaker) R. Kiplin Guy, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Daniel Arendt, Northeast Ohio Medical University

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

CPD as a Means to Professional Development: Strategies for Curricular Threading of Lifelong Learning Concepts

Curricula have an important role in promoting and supporting the process of self-directed lifelong learning for student pharmacists as outlined in ACPE Standards. The benefits of adopting a CPD approach include assistance with attaining educational outcomes and creating “CPD ready” graduates. However, threading CPD skill development through the curriculum requires a coordinated effort with systems for support and assessment. This session will explore CPD placement in didactic and experiential curriculum with practical implementation techniques highlighted.

(Moderator) Jennifer L. Baumgartner, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Elizabeth A. Sheaffer, Samford University; (Speaker) Hoai-An Truong, University of Maryland Eastern Shore; (Speaker) Trina J. von Waldner, The University of Georgia

1.00 Contact Hour

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Mental Health First Aid: Increasing Student Pharmacist Preparedness to Respond Through Simulation

When encountering mental health crises, such as suicide, pharmacists and student pharmacists are underprepared to respond. In this session, presenters from The University of Sydney and Washington State University will describe their experiences in developing and implementing Mental Health First Aid training and simulated patient assessments into curricula. An educational framework will be provided that can be used to increase the number of individuals who are prepared to respond during a mental health crisis.

(Speaker) Damianne Brand-Eubanks, Washington State University; (Speaker) Sarira El-den, University of Sydney; (Speaker) Anne Kim, Washington State University; (Speaker) Rebekah Moles; (Speaker) Jennifer D. Robinson, Washington State University

1.00 Contact Hour

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

COP + FDA: Collaborating with the FDA in Basic Science, Experiential Education and Curriculum

The FDA is ripe with mutually beneficial opportunities for pharmacy schools, yet is often underutilized for research and education collaborations and future career opportunities for students. Given the need for unique skillsets in the future pharmacy workforce, this session will introduce participants to key collaboration areas with the FDA: basic sciences, experiential education, and curricular content and resources. Opportunities and examples of successful collaborations will be presented by faculty and an FDA representative.

(Speaker) Joseph Grillo; (Speaker) Lindsey H. Welch, The University of Georgia

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Sunshine or Rain: Implications of the 2019 National Pharmacist Workforce Study for Pharmacy Educators

This session will describe key findings from the 2019 National Pharmacist Workforce Study including burnout and student debt, as well as discrimination and harassment in pharmacy workplaces. Reported findings can help shape approaches Colleges of Pharmacy can use to address these issues. The presenters will share experiences and perspectives on how these topics can be addressed. Group discussions will be used to share additional strategies for pharmacy educators to manage these topics.

(Speaker) Matthew Witry, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) William R. Doucette, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Brianne K. Bakken, Medical College of Wisconsin

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Can You Really Integrate From Day 1? Examples From a “Courseless” Curriculum

What does curricular integration actually look like in the classroom? How soon is too soon to integrate? This program will describe the format of a fully integrated, “courseless” curriculum at one school of pharmacy. Rather than traditional courses, “learning experiences” are integrated with foundational, social/behavioral and clinical sciences beginning on day one of the P1 year. Participants will see tangible examples from the classroom with a focus on organization and integration throughout the P1 year.

(Speaker) Lori B. Hornsby, Auburn University; (Speaker) Bradley Wright, Auburn University

0.50 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Capturing Change: Assessing the Personal and Professional Development Among Pharmacy Students

Significant emphasis is placed upon personal and professional development among student pharmacists, yet many factors make it challenging to assess those students. Three programs will present their longitudinal programs for assessing Standard 4 attributes using both qualitative and quantitative methods. This session for faculty addresses how programs may best use assessment results to foster personal and professional development among students, such as through interpretative reports, self-reflection, faculty advising with rubric-based grading, and co-curricular mentoring groups.

(Speaker) Sean T. Leonard, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Minakshi Lahiri, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Jill M. Augustine, Mercer University; (Speaker) Justine S. Gortney, Wayne State University

1.00 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Promoting Student Achievement Through Practices of Early Intervention, Metacognition and Remediation

Defining indicators of academic risk, inculcating academic achievement, and implementing effective remediation practices are critical foci for all pharmacy programs. Collectively, academic support initiatives are aimed at improving metrics of attrition, progression, and practice-readiness. The presence of such initiatives further supports program compliance with ACPE Standard 17. This session is appropriate for all pharmacy educators and program administrators, and highlights academic support facilitation in three institutions.

(Speaker) Steven J. Crosby, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) C. Leiana Oswald, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) James M. Culhane, Notre Dame of Maryland University

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

“Tuh-MAY-Toe” or “Tah-MAH-Toe”: The Pragmatist vs. Idealist APPE-Readiness Debate

Presenters from two colleges of pharmacy will describe each institutions’ unique assessment plan to measure student APPE Readiness. Presenters will debate potential solutions to several key questions surrounding APPE readiness while engaging the audience in the discussion. Throughout the debate presenters will address implications, opportunities and trade-offs of each institution's assessment plan with the audience. Time will be allotted for the audience to share challenges and solutions within their current approach to APPE readiness.

(Speaker) Eric H. Gilliam, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Kali M. VanLangen, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Lisa M. Meny, Ferris State University

1.00 Contact Hour

Thursday, July 23

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Creating Discerning Clinicians: A Model for Longitudinal Literature Evaluation Instruction

The purpose of this session is to highlight a thoughtful approach to curricular design to maximize relevance and resource utilization in teaching, assessing, and providing feedback regarding literature evaluation skills, with the goal of developing students into discerning clinicians. We will discuss the structure and rationale regarding our sequence, methods of maintaining relevance to the overall curriculum, and showcase our strategies for individualized assessment and feedback of a large class of students with limited resources.

(Speaker) Evan Williams, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Surajit Dey, Roseman University of Health Sciences

Noon–1:00 p.m.

O, to See Ourselves as Others See Us...A Curricular Progression from Self to Peer Assessment

This session will navigate innovative methods for developing skills in self-reflection, self- and peer-assessments, as well as near-peer teaching across three colleges of pharmacy. Panelists will describe the development of such activities within a skills laboratory setting, mapping benefits to EPAs and 2013 CAPE Educational Outcomes. In addition, barriers to implementation will be addressed. Participants will have the opportunity to consider applicability to the curriculum within their colleges of pharmacy.

(Moderator) James R. Taylor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Crystal Zhou, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Jaekyu Shin, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Jaime Riskin, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Colleen A. Dula, The Ohio State University

1.00 Contact Hour

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Enhancing Resilience in Learners and Educators

As educators, we seek to enhance the development of resilience in future pharmacists and in ourselves. Speakers will describe methods for doing so, including implementation of formal resilience training and delivery of a resilience story slam, during which speakers told brief stories related to the theme of resilience. Program evaluation results and learner perspectives will be shared. Attendees will be encouraged to reflect on their own resilience given the information presented.

(Speaker) Laura H. Waite, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Amber King, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Elena M. Umland, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Laura A. Mandos, University of the Sciences

1.00 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Four Schools Tackle Meaningful Preceptor Development

Schools and colleges of pharmacy, the primary source of IPPE and APPE preceptor development, are commonly concerned with how to provide meaningful preceptor development programming that enhances preceptors’ ability to optimize learning for students and meets accreditation standards. This session will provide attendees with novel examples of ways to advance to that goal line in a variety of mediums and approaches. Attendees will create plans to tackle barriers to implement novel preceptor development methods in their own schools.

(Speaker) Janet H. Cooley, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Suzanne Larson, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Mary Douglass Smith, Presbyterian College; (Speaker) Charlene Williams, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1.00 Contact Hour

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Development, Implementation and Evolution of a Pharmacy and Nurse Practitioner Student Interprofessional Communication Activity

Interprofessional education is a key feature in the 2013 CAPE outcomes (promoter, collaborator). Simulation exercises with prescriber students are essential to ensure pharmacy students are APPE and practice ready and have adequate communication skills with other providers. Conducting these exercises can be challenging without a teaching hospital or medical center nearby. This session describes the development of a pharmacy and nurse practitioner IPE using Zoom to facilitate connection and communication with standardized cases.

(Speaker) Jeremy Daniel, South Dakota State University; (Speaker) Alex W. Middendorf, South Dakota State University

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Polishing Your Pearl: A Guide to Carving Out a Prominent Place in the Publishing Space

As a pharmacist, pharmaceutical scientist, social/administrative pharmacy researcher or administrator, you’ve published in your discipline. Have you ever considered publishing in pharmacy education? Are there best practices for conducting successful research and publishing as a pharmacy educator? This session will provide an overview of publication strategies for scholarly work in pharmacy education. Learn from pharmacy education journal editors about tips and tricks that make your work appealing to editors, reviewers and the Academy.

(Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Developing a New Practice Site—Integrating Into the Care Teams in Acute and Ambulatory Care

Pharmacist may face challenges starting a practice site. Clinical faculty may be developing sites from the start and need to learn about the process of change management and leadership for success. Demonstrating competencies early to your new team raises the possibility of acceptance into the team and plays a crucial role in successfully establishing the practice site. Here, we discuss strategies for developing both acute care and ambulatory care services for pharmacists.

(Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Maya Leiva, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Rebecca Leon, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Lianjie Xiong, Sutter Health; (Speaker) Zachary A. Weber, Purdue University

1.00 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Continuing Professional Development as a Framework for Preceptor and Non-Preceptor Practitioners

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is a framework for pharmacy practitioners to maintain continuing competence and to advance their professional practice. This program will focus on CPD for preceptor and non-preceptor practitioners. The session will define the CPD framework, introduce the CPD cycle, and discuss how practitioners can utilize this model to facilitate self-directed practitioner development. The session will also provide examples of how schools and colleges have encouraged and motivated CPD in their faculty and preceptors.

(Moderator) Jodie V. Malhotra, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Jaclyn D. Cole, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Suzanne Larson, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Stephen A. Brown, Samford University; (Chair) Hoai-An Truong, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

1.00 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Cultivating Essential Skills—Situational Judgement Tests to Develop Professionalism

Development and objective assessment of non-cognitive attributes is challenging. Situational judgement tests (SJTs) represent a methodology for developing and assessing non-cognitive attributes and may overcome the reliability, validity and feasibility issues of alternative evaluation methods (e.g. reflections, multiple mini interviews, observations). This workshop will examine curricular implementation of SJTs at three institutions and investigate use of SJTs to develop essential skills of student pharmacists.

(Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, University of Florida; (Speaker) Michelle Z. Farland, University of Florida; (Speaker) Jennifer D. Robinson, Washington State University; (Speaker) Carl Kirkpatrick, Monash University; (Speaker) Kirstie Galbraith

Friday, July 24

11:00 a.m.–Noon

First Do No Harm: How to Avoid Common Pitfalls and Address Ethical Challenges in Global Health Experiences

Global health experiences result in increased interest in volunteerism and humanitarianism. Bi-lateral and multi-lateral initiatives can build capacity and improve health care globally. Relationships with international partners must be based on equity, respect, justice and reciprocity. Students must act within a scope of practice that would be acceptable in the United States. This highly interactive special session will focus on ethical concerns that commonly arise in student global experiences including partnership-building, research and practice

(Moderator) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) Jeanine P. Abrons, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Sharon E. Connor, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Lauren J. Jonkman, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University; (Speaker) Ellen M. Schellhase, Purdue University

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Near Perfect Syndrome: Disease Eentric to Patient-Centric Collaborative Model, Integrating Acronyms LEARN, PACE and OARS into QuEST/SCHOLAR-MAC Framework

QuEST/SCHOLAR-MAC model is the gold standard in Self-Care patient counseling simulations. Mimicking the Pharmacist Patient Care Process model (PPCP), the QuEST/SCHOLAR-MAC provides the simplest framework for quick assess and recommendation to patients. Focusing on patient-centric collaborative model rather than disease-centric, more is needed to address the patient’s needs. Engaging students in such movement/practice experience unleashed the truth about this myth. Perfecting it requires an integration of key acronyms/concepts -Cultural humility-LEARN, relational elements-PACE, motivational interviewing core skills-OARS into the gold standard model. Teaching in teams is becoming popular due to innovative curriculum integration strategies. Learning to plan and merge content, teaching styles, and assessments of a teaching team can often be challenging and takes time to achieve. Successes and strategies of teaching as an interdisciplinary team will be discussed as faculty attendees learn from faculty and student perspectives associated with one school’s experience in addressing the challenges of team teaching in a fully integrated and courseless curriculum.

(Speaker) Miriam Ansong, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Allen Keshishian Namagerdi, California Health Sciences University / (Speaker) Bradley Wright, Auburn University; (Speaker) Lea S. Eiland, Auburn University

0.50 Contact Hour / 0.50 Contact Hour

1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Enhancing Application and Long-Term Retention of Clinical Knowledge Using an Extracurricular Non-Credit Course

Pharm.D. programs continue increasing required curricular content, necessitating innovative approaches to facilitate student learning. This session presents the example of an extracurricular course designed using a case-based approach integrating learning concepts such as repeated testing, repetitive rules and patterns, and interleaving to move students from memorization of content knowledge to application in clinical situations. Faculty interested in creating instructional designs to modify and complement existing curricula should attend for approaches to design, implementation, and assessment.

(Speaker) Kimberley J. Begley, Creighton University; (Speaker) Kevin T. Fuji, Creighton University

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Untangling the Web of Clinical Decision Making Using PDMPs: A Vignette-Based Learning Experience

Oftentimes within the healthcare setting, there isn’t a clear-cut “right” or “wrong” choice which can lead to increased variance in clinical decision making—often at the cost of inequitable care for patients. This session will discuss an innovative method to identify discrepancies in decision making among student pharmacists. The target audience for this setting is faculty interested in preparing students for community-based rotations (IPPE/APPE) where the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program will be used.

(Speaker) James Douglas Thornton, University of Houston; (Speaker) Vaishnavi Tata, University of Houston College of Pharmacy

0.50 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Innovation in Teaching—Patient Voices: Practicing With Intent

The recipient of the 2020 Innovation in Teaching Award will present the winning submission.

(Moderator) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University; (Speaker) Annie Nebergall; (Speaker) Anna Haas-Gehres

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Encouraging Inclusion: Incorporating LGBTQIA+ Activities for Community and Hospital Pharmacy Throughout Student Pharmacists Educational Experience

This session will discuss the implementation of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersexed, and Asexual (LGBTQIA+) activities across three installments of a student pharmacist six-semester practice-based course focused on serving LGBTQIA+ patients in community and hospital pharmacy practice. The target audience is pharmacy educators. Participants will be introduced to the institutions’ initiative to better serve this growing patient demographic. The LGBTQIA+ community faces many disparities and pharmacists are in prime position to be patient advocates.

(Speaker) Chelsey K. Llayton; (Speaker) Lauren M. Caldas, Virginia Commonwealth University

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

All In: Leveraging Multi-Institutional Collaboration to Transform Community Pharmacy

Community pharmacy practice transformation initiatives such as Academic-CPESN Transformation (ACT) and Flip the Pharmacy have created demand for faculty to collaborate on research, education, service, and QA/QI to support local community pharmacy networks. These CPESN networks cover diverse geopolitical regions and include multiple pharmacy academic institutions, providing opportunities for multi-institutional collaboration. Promoting effective strategies for multi-institutional collaboration is essential for developing meaningful partnerships and the efficient use of faculty resources.

(Speaker) KariLynn Dowling-McClay, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Sharon S. Gatewood, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Tyler S. Dougherty, South College; (Speaker) Jessica M. Robinson, East Tennessee State University

1.00 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Moving IPE to the Next Level: Enhancing Collaborative Practice Through Legislative Change and Advocacy

Interprofessional education (IPE) is required in the training of future pharmacists and their health professions peers. Evidence exists illustrating that patient-centered, collaborative care results in better patient outcomes. However, legislative change supporting collaborative practice is lacking. Students are IPE trained but often enter a workforce that may not embrace collaborative practice; thus, creating a difficult transition and disconnect. This panel will encourage leaders in IPE to pursue legislative change to promote interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP).

(Speaker) Jennifer L Adams, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Kari L. Franson, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Angela S Stewart, Washington State University; (Speaker) Sara Mahmoud; (Moderator) Elena M. Umland, Thomas Jefferson University

1.00 Contact Hour

Monday, July 27

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Spark Joy in Precepting: Begin With the End in Mind

Preceptors serve as role models for pharmacy learners but often find themselves overwhelmed with work and struggle to find purpose and joy in their professional and precepting roles. Attendees in this session will have an opportunity to learn about the importance of core values in self-development and be challenged to build a meaningful precepting philosophy based on their personal values. Preceptors will walk home with an individualized action plan aimed to develop the ‘whole’ student.

(Speaker) Jennifer Chang, University of Washington; (Speaker) Anita J. Cleven, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Huy T. Hoang, Pacific University Oregon

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Teach the Teacher: A Conversation with FDA About Pharmacogenomics Information in Drug Labeling

A key resource for pharmacogenomics information is FDA-approved drug labeling. This session will provide pharmacogenomics educators the opportunity to learn directly from FDA representatives about how decisions are made with respect to integrating pharmacogenomics data into FDA-approved drug labeling as well as the clinical utility and limitations of this information. This discussion-based session will engage participants and generate valuable insights into how to integrate contemporary regulatory science into pharmacy school curricula to advance pharmacogenomics education.

(Moderator) Roseann S. Gammal, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) Joseph Grillo; (Speaker) Robert Schuck; (Speaker) Amy L. Pasternak, University of Michigan; (Speaker) Rustin Crutchley, Washington State University

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Soft Skills Need Hard Tools: Review of Validated Instruments to Assess Global Health Education

Global health education encompasses broad goals including delivery of cross-cultural care, caring for the underserved, improving inequities, and working with diverse populations. Though global health education has grown in popularity, assessment strategies are not well defined. This session will highlight different tools used in didactic courses across health professions to assess global health knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and skills identified through a systematic review. Participants will discuss these assessment tools and their application to curricula/courses.

(Moderator) Abby A. Kahaleh, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Sharon E. Connor, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Jordan R. Covvey, Duquesne University; (Speaker) Lauren J. Jonkman, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Melody H. Ryan, University of Kentucky

1.00 Contact Hour

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Are We Talking About the Same Thing? Evaluating Priority Leadership and Professionalism Traits Across Stakeholders

With the dynamic and complex healthcare environment, it is imperative that pharmacy programs produce future leaders and high performing professionals. While many agree these constructs are important in the pharmacy workforce, how we define leadership and professionalism can vary across student, faculty and preceptor stakeholders. Presenters will share experiences in identifying key traits, building consensus on priority leadership and professionalism attributes across stakeholders, and integrating these prioritized traits within the curriculum.

(Speaker) Jacqueline M Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Stephanie N. Kiser, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

0.50 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Ethical Issues in Health Professions Education

Ethics are included in the ACPE Standards 2016: “Exploration of approaches to resolving ethical dilemmas in patient care, addressing moral responsibility and the ability to critically evaluate viable options against the needs of patients and other key stakeholders.” Standards 2016 also address ethics education as a component of experiential and interprofessional education. This session will address cases requiring the application of ethical principles and framework for decision-making as well as guidance for faculty teaching ethics.

(Speaker) Diane B. Ginsburg, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) M. Lynn Crismon, The University of Texas at Austin; (Chair) David M. Baker, Western New England University

1.00 Contact Hour

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Blissful Being: Bringing Mindfulness and Wellness to College of Pharmacy Faculty

Bliss is defined as supreme happiness, utter joy or contentment. Blissful Being is one who is full of supreme happiness, utter joy and contentment. Is this even possible? Taking a holistic and regenerative approach to adding mindfulness activities into curriculum have been shown to improve wellness in terms of positive affect, resiliency and decreased stress. The increasing mental health crisis has prompted the need for pharmacy schools to take a proactive approach toward increasing wellness among students. In this mini-session we will detail activities in a year-long faculty wellness program and results of self-reported burnout and stress over that period of time.

(Speaker) Teresa M. Cavanaugh, University of Florida; (Speaker) Stacey D. Curtis, University of Florida

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Ready or Not, Here They Come!—Supporting Students at Risk for Poor Performance on APPEs

Early detection and intervention for students with academic and professionalism issues is a requirement of ACPE standards. While early detection systems are more readily available in the didactic environment, they are more difficult to implement in experiential training. Early detection and intervention programs are particularly important for students at risk of poor performance on APPEs. This session will showcase an approach to monitoring and early intervention for at-risk students to minimize poor performance on APPEs.

(Speaker) Carinda Feild, University of Florida; (Speaker) Karen Whalen, University of Florida

0.50 Contact Hour

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

It’s All in the Gumbo: Cultural Competence, Health Disparities and Preparation of Future Pharmacists for a Diverse Population

Have you ever wondered how you can get your students to become a pharmacist who delivers authentic patient-centered care? Are you in need of new ideas to train culturally aware pharmacists? This mini-session will focus on how cultural competency can be integrated throughout the pharmacy curriculum, including didactic and experiential activities. Speakers will share successes and lessons learned during implementation of multiple strategies.

(Speaker) Lakeisha G. Williams, Xavier University of Louisiana; (Speaker) Melanie Haydel, Xavier University of Louisiana; (Moderator) Sara A. Al-Dahir, Xavier University of Louisiana

0.50 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Closing the Integration Gap: Using High-Fidelity Simulation to Integrate Pharmaceutical and Clinical Sciences

Transitioning from foundational science to the clinical curriculum is challenging due to a paucity of models of integration. We implemented a novel Integrated Cardiovascular Simulation (ICS) using high-fidelity manikins following the P2 pathophysiology and pharmacology course sequence. Students practiced the SBAR communication technique, heart failure symptomatology, arrhythmia electrocardiogram interpretation and patient counseling skills integrated with foundational science content through post-session debriefing. We will discuss the curriculum, assessment and transferability of ICS for Pharm.D. programs. Target: all levels.

(Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Song Oh, California Northstate University

Tuesday, July 28

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Batman and Robin: Exploring Efficiencies of Departmental Leadership Using a Vice-Chair Model

Pharmacy academia is undergoing significant transition as enrollment challenges mount, the pharmacist's role on the healthcare team evolves, and student needs are becoming more resource-intensive. Vice-chairs can partner effectively with department chairs to help faculty achieve both institutional and personal goals. This session will facilitate open discussion about utilizing individuals in a vice-chair role and provide resources to institutions considering the addition of (or modifications to) a vice-chair model.

(Speaker) Laura H. Waite, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Angela K. Nagel, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Elizabeth (Lisa) Phillips, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Cathy Y. Poon, University of the Sciences

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Using Standardized Patients for Case Portrayal and Assessment—Approaches to Enhance Accuracy and Reproducibility

Standardized patient (SP) encounters provide opportunities for students to apply knowledge and skills in a realistic and safe environment. Training SPs to accurately and consistently portray a case and assess learners is key to the success of these encounters, especially for summative assessments. SP assessment of appropriately selected domains of student performance during these encounters can also help decrease faculty workload associated with grading.

(Speaker) Kelly Lempicki, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Carol A. Motycka, University of Florida; (Speaker) Chasity M. Shelton, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Jamie Pitt, University of Tennessee Health Science Center

1.00 Contact Hour

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Overcoming Extracurricular Challenges: Keys to Improving Graduate Student and Post-Doc Wellness

Student pharmacist mental health is receiving heightened attention, and similar challenges exist among graduate students and post-docs in managing their wellness. The unique mental health challenges experienced by these trainees will be highlighted and discussed in this program, referencing observations made by researchers while showcasing potential resources and solutions. The session will also facilitate group discussion among faculty around real-world struggles they’ve seen in their trainees, allowing for subsequent, collaborative development of potential strategies.

(Chair) Kimberly B. Garza, Auburn University; (Speaker) Phong Luong, University of California, Irvine; (Speaker) Nathan L. Vanderford

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Rethinking Advanced: Building an APPE That Drives Practice Change in Community Pharmacies

Fifteen years ago, as community pharmacies implemented MTM services, APPEs were designed to prepare students for those services. Today, community pharmacies offer clinical services to meet demands of value-based care. As practice advances, APPEs are a viable mechanism to assist pharmacies while exposing students to new models of care. This session highlights how to strategically enhance experiential education in community practice and how to design rotations for mutual benefit to both the pharmacy and student.

(Speaker) Megan G. Smith, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Shanna O'Connor, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Amy Schmidt, North Star Pharmacy and Infusion

1.00 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Do You Want to Build an OSCE?: A Tale of the OSCE Across Three Colleges of Pharmacy

An Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has become a preferred method to evaluate learner performance across various health professions, including pharmacy. Since pharmacy education has shifted towards a patient-centric profession, students should be assessed on clinical competence, knowledge, and communication skills to ensure practice readiness based on the Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs). This session will discuss best practices for OSCE implementation and share how three Colleges of Pharmacy conduct OSCEs.

(Speaker) Wendy H. Updike, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Stacey D. Curtis, University of Florida; (Speaker) James R. Taylor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Jamie Woodyard, Purdue University; (Speaker) Erini Serag-Bolos, University of South Florida

1.00 Contact Hour

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Actions Speak Louder Than Written Words: Engaging Students Through Authentic Assessment

According to Adult Learning Theory, learners desire problem-based learning as well as being oriented to the roles they will take on. One way to do this is through developing a simulated experience that mimics the role the student will take. Additionally, by providing a student with a simulated experience, an authentic assessment can be provided for the evaluation of the skills necessary for the future role upon completion of the curriculum. Pharmacy practice audience members will be given an overview of how this was accomplished in a College of Pharmacy elective through an active learning instructional design and assessed with a simulated patient encounter. Audience members will then be asked to begin to develop their own activity to implement in their curriculum.

(Speaker) Delaney Ivy, Texas A&M University; (Speaker) Heather Hay, Texas A&M University

0.50 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Beyond Analyzing the Data: Leveraging Your Biostatistician to Boost Your Scholarship Capacity and Quality Throughout

Clinical pharmacy faculty may be uncomfortable engaging in scholarly activities. Faculty may perceive the role of socioeconomic sciences Ph.D. faculty as solely performing data analysis for research projects. However, their contribution to clinical faculty research and scholarship goes far beyond just a data analyst and can include study design and methodology development. This session is intended to share successful strategies of incorporating your faculty with a greater comfort level in study design, methodology, and biostatistics into the entire research process to enhance your scholarship productivity.

(Speaker) P. Brandon Bookstaver, University of South Carolina; (Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Z. Kevin Lu, University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Shaowei Wan, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Lianjie Xiong, Sutter Health - Modesto, CA

1.00 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Preparing Our Graduates for the NAPLEX—Do Test Prep Programs Make a Difference?

Despite scarce evidence of effectiveness, many pharmacy schools offer required or elective NAPLEX preparation programs. This session will present results of a nationwide survey describing NAPLEX preparation programs offered by schools and colleges of pharmacy. Additionally, presenters will share data evaluating association between NAPLEX preparation program characteristics and first-attempt NAPLEX pass rates. The session will encourage open discussion for a nuanced understanding of the relationship between NAPLEX preparation programs and success on the licensure exam.

(Speaker) Omar F. Attarabeen, Marshall University; (Speaker) Carol Goldin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; (Speaker) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Karen R. Sando, Nova Southeastern University

1.00 Contact Hour

Wednesday, July 29

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Lessons Learned: Case Examples of Interprofessional Education Programmatic Evaluation

Programmatic evaluation for quality interprofessional education (IPE) is challenging. Purposeful selection of learning models can guide development of robust evaluation plans. Presenters will provide overview of applicable learning models, and share processes of evaluation plan development at their home institutions. Participants will receive evidence-based information and tangible ideas for guiding appropriate selection and alignment of evaluation methodologies and tools within their own IPE programs. Target audience is faculty/instructors involved in development and assessment of IPE.

(Speaker) Casey Gallimore, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Susanne G. Barnett, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Joseph A. Zorek, University of Texas Health Science Center

Noon–1:00 p.m.

The Importance of Skills-Based Courses in Aligning Expectations for Progression Within the Pharmacy Curriculum

The pharmacy scope of practice is evolving with a need to develop diverse students’ skill sets. The 2016 ACPE Accreditation Standards, CAPE 2013 Education Outcomes, and the Entrustable Professional Activities all strongly emphasize skills development and assessment. However, the expected progression of such skills within the curriculum is not clearly defined and varies between institutions. This session will review innovative design and sequencing of pharmacy skills laboratory courses from a cohort of Florida colleges.

(Speaker) Mariette Sourial, Palm Beach Atlantic University; (Speaker) Melissa Ruble, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Jaclyn D. Cole, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Marina Ishak, Nova Southeastern University

1.00 Contact Hour

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

A Discussion of Current Online Pharm.D. Degree Programs

Online Pharm.D. degrees are currently offered by three schools of pharmacy: Creighton University, Duquesne University, and the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM). Each school will discuss their program as well as the technology used and the process of converting face-to-face to online content.

(Speaker) Marsha McFalls, Duquesne University; (Speaker) Kimberley J. Begley, Creighton University; (Speaker) Kristen M. Gawronski, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

1.00 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

It’s Debatable: Implementing and Assessing Debates in Required and Elective Didactic Courses

Pharmacy educators will learn innovative active learning strategies utilizing debates in a required integrated therapeutics and elective course. Sample teaching strategies about debates from three different institutions will be discussed. Presenters will describe how to assess 1. student perception, 2. pre/post knowledge assessment, and 3. summative exam data to measure outcomes and student learning. Attendees will be armed with instructions, outcome assessment tools and debates prompts to incorporate debates in their courses.

(Speaker) Edo-abasi U. McGee, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine; (Speaker) Jeffrey A. Kyle, Samford University; (Speaker) Beth Cady, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

1.00 Contact Hour

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Bring That Patient to Life—Enhance Learning With 360° Interactive Virtual Reality (VR) Technology

It can be challenging to conceptualize patient care with little exposure to actual treatment environments and modalities. Virtual reality technology is one method to bring the treatment environment to the classroom and “bring patients to life”. Learn more about the use of 360o interactive virtual reality (VR) technology in a critical care elective and its impact on student engagement, understanding of, and comfort and preparedness with an ICU environment and patient care treatment modalities.

(Speaker) Carinda Feild, University of Florida; (Speaker) Julie S. Thomas, University of Florida

0.50 Contact Hour

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Ring, Ring: Implementing a Telehealth Veterans Affairs Population Health Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience Course

ACPE Standards 2016 expects Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE) to expose students to common contemporary practice models and patient-centered and population-based care. Two institutions will share their innovative approaches to designing and implementing a telehealth IPPE course that focuses on population health in collaboration with two Veterans Affairs Healthcare Systems. The successful launch, lessons learned, opportunities for improvement, and best practices will be shared to enhance replicability and scalability to other healthcare institutions.

(Speaker) Lena McDowell, Auburn University; (Speaker) Pamela L. Stamm, Auburn University; (Speaker) Allen Shek, University of the Pacific; (Speaker) Sian Carr-Lopez, University of the Pacific; (Speaker) Randell K. Miyahara

1.00 Contact Hour

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Early Detection, Supplemental Instruction and Self-Directed Remediation: The Life Raft to Keep Students Afloat

A three-pronged approach is utilized to reduce attrition from the Pharm.D. program. The first includes daily academic monitoring utilizing sophisticated technology to identify/support students who are having academic challenges. Second, supplemental instruction is offered as an additional resource for focused learning. Last, self-directed remediation based on the humanistic theory of learning is provided in the summer. In addition to enhancing on-time graduation rates, this student-centered, personalized approach cultivates skills necessary for life-long continual professional development.

(Speaker) Teresa M. Cavanaugh, University of Florida; (Speaker) Shauna Buring

0.50 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

A Multiple Perspective Discussion on Lessons Learned From the Accreditation Self-Study Process

The accreditation self-study requires intense preparation to submit a quality report that accurately reflects program strengths and opportunities for improvement. Gathering data, writing narratives, organizing the report, and ensuring endorsement by faculty, staff and students can be overwhelming. This session explores approaches and perspectives from multiple pharmacy schools. Panel participants include self-study co-chairs who recently completed the self-study and accreditation process.

(Speaker) Darin C. Ramsey, Butler University; (Speaker) Bernadette K. Brown, Butler University; (Speaker) Patricia L. Darbishire, Purdue University; (Speaker) Timothy J. Bloom, Shenandoah University

1.00 Contact Hour

Thursday, July 30

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Taking ExamSoft to the Next Level: Use of Advanced Reporting for Programmatic Improvements

Many programs use ExamSoft to administer assessments, but not all programs are reaping the full benefits of the data maintained within the program. Advanced reporting can offer programs insight into student performance and remediation, course design, faculty teaching, and curricular effectiveness. This session will explore how three schools are using longitudinal performance data to provide feedback to students, faculty and the curriculum as a whole.

(Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) David J. Caldwell, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

From Couch to PGY1: Experiences and Innovations in Residency Preparatory Courses

Post-graduate training opportunities are becoming increasingly more competitive and as faculty members and preceptors, we are constantly seeking new and innovative ways to afford students the opportunity of successfully obtaining post-graduate training positions. Preparing students takes more than a lecture on post-graduate opportunities and/or polishing a CV or letter-of-intent. This session will highlight elective courses and innovative experiences from various universities on obtaining post-graduate opportunities.

(Speaker) Sean Smithgall, Auburn University; (Speaker) Taylor D. Steuber, Auburn University; (Speaker) Tibb F. Jacobs, The University of Louisiana at Monroe

1.00 Contact Hour

1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Examining Student Self-Awareness of Performance on Entrustable Professional Activities Given Context of Preceptor Evaluations

In experiential learning, student self-evaluation of knowledge and skills is used to determine students’ self-awareness. At our institution we ask learners to self-assess their performance on Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs). The purpose of this self-assessment is to investigate if students can accurately self-evaluate performance on EPAs and if their accuracy and therefore, self-awareness, improves over time. This session will describe the justification, design, outcomes, and lessons learned from using student self-evaluation of EPAs to measure self-awareness.

(Speaker) Kathryn A. Fuller, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Abbey M. Kruse, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Using EPAs as ABCs: Alternative Building of a Curriculum

Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) provide a method to ensure pharmacy students are adequately prepared to enter pharmacy practice. Can the EPAs be used as the foundation of a new curriculum, meeting ACPE requirements? The EPAs can be utilized as a backbone to determine content for didactic and simulation courses across disciplines. Defining competency outcomes for each professional year prior to change, the curriculum can be methodically built with the intention of developing practice-ready graduates.

(Speaker) Richard J. Silvia, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) Christy S. Harris, MCPHS University–Boston

0.50 Contact Hour

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

“Design Thinking” for Integrating Pharmaceutical and Clinical Sciences: An Interactive Workshop

Design thinking creates solutions for complex problems through iterative and continuous adjustment by including the end user as a part of the process. We will demonstrate how design thinking may be adapted to enhance curricular models of integration of pharmaceutical and clinical sciences for pharmacy programs. H-, Z- and spiral integration models and Harden’s Ladder will be examined and audience members will participate in designing approaches for integrating foundational and clinical sciences. Target: all levels.

(Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Mathews, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

From Chaos to Efficiency: Using a Centralized Constituent Relationship Management System for Student Support

Is your student data current, consistent and accessible to those who need it? Designing and implementing a centralized CRM (Constituent Relationship Management) system created efficiency, organization, and improved communication across our college of pharmacy. We transformed business processes in recruitment, student retention, enrollment management, and many other aspects of student support. Join us as we share our journey in collecting/using student data that supports the student, college units and accreditation needs with a connected campus.

(Speaker) Shauna M. Buring, University of Florida; (Speaker) Sarah K. Barker, University of Florida

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Implementation Strategies and Leading Practices for Integrating Substance Use Education within Doctor of Pharmacy Curricula

Pharmacists regularly encounter patients who misuse substances, but few receive formal training. AACP provides curricular guidelines for integrating substance misuse and addiction education within Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) curricula, yet implementation of these guidelines remains varied. A panel with faculty from four diverse pharmacy programs will present and discuss (1) important lessons learned from substance misuse training with pharmacy students, (2) implementation strategies for successful curriculum integration and (3) implications for pharmacy practice.

(Moderator) Alexandra A. Nowalk; (Speaker) Lucas A. Berenbrok, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Brittany L. Riley, Marshall University; (Speaker) Nataliya Scheinberg, Shenandoah University; (Speaker) Daniel J. Ventricelli, University of the Sciences

1.00 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

“The Camera Does Add 10lbs” and Other Important Teaching Considerations in a Video Connected Classroom

Multi-campus pharmacy schools have led the way with incorporation of video-connected classrooms. Single campus pharmacy schools can capitalize on these experiences with video-conferencing to help teach skills needed for video-connected healthcare delivery. Faculty seeking ways to maximize effectiveness and engage students in video-connected environments will benefit. Participants can expect an active session, with practical and meaningful tips to take back to their campus. Video-technology teaching examples will be shared in a fun and educational environment.

(Speaker) Stephanie N. Kiser, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Michelle Z. Farland, University of Florida

1.00 Contact Hour

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

21st Century Teaching: Essential Curricular Design Elements of Hybrid and Online Courses for Pharmacy Programs

As the numbers of millennial and new generation learners attending pharmacy school increase, the modalities of educational delivery need to match their different, self-directed, self-paced and interactive learning styles. We will present essential elements of course design for online and hybrid courses including strategies for student onboarding, curricular design, and assessment. Examples of hybrid and online Pharm.D. courses, assessment, student perception data, and transferability to other programs will be discussed.

(Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Ruth Vinall, California Northstate University

Friday, July 31

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Integrating Palliative Care and Discussions on Death and Dying Into Pharmacy Curricula

Although pharmacist involvement in palliative care continues to grow, training within the pharmacy curriculum remains limited and varies by program. Pharmacists require training in the clinical and non-clinical aspects of palliative care to meet the needs of an aging population and greater proportion of patients with serious illness. This session will provide background, practical strategies, and examples to integrate palliative care into the curriculum with a focus on core competencies integral for all student pharmacists.

(Speaker) Jon P. Furuno, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Marian Gaviola, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Meredith L. Howard, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Jennifer Pruskowski, University of Pittsburgh

1.00 Contact Hour

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Measuring the Heartbeat of the Student Learning Culture: What They Do to Supplement Learning and How You Can Adapt

Learning via online has become prevalent. Online learning resources (OLR) may provide benefits to students beyond what faculty in a classroom setting can do. What are the characteristics of the students using OLR? Do they perform better academically? Can we leverage OLR to support or accommodate the various learning needs of our diverse students or those “at-risk”? Come and hear the survey results from a three-institution study attempting to answer these questions.

(Speaker) Adam B. Woolley, Northeastern University; (Speaker) See-Won Seo, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) Sharon K. Park, Notre Dame of Maryland University

1.00 Contact Hour

1:00 p.m.– 2:00 p.m.

Putting the Puzzle Pieces Together: Facilitating Data-Informed Decision Making Using Real-Time Curricular Mapping and Course-Streams

Both the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy and The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy have engaged faculty in sustainable, real-time curriculum mapping as part of the course development process for the past several years. This strategy improved instruction, assessed curricular effectiveness, informed continuous quality improvement and identified faculty development opportunities. Using lessons learned, participants will explore mapping strategies and novel curricular course design infrastructures, such as course streams, to facilitate data-informed decision making.

(Speaker) Jacqueline M. Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Mary E. Ray, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Denise H. Rhoney, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1.00 Contact Hour

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Thinking Outside the Box: Applying “Design Thinking” to Create Innovative Interprofessional Education Activities

Design thinking is the process of creating solutions for complex problems by including the end user as a part of the solution. Adapted from the profession of design, the process emphasizes creating solutions through cyclic, iterative and continuous adjustment. We will discuss how design thinking principles may be adapted to create interprofessional education experiences where students learn to empathize, define, ideate, prototype and test IPE solution for complex care patients. Target audience: all levels.

(Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, California Northstate University

2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Bridging the Gap: Introducing LGBTQ-focused Topics Through IPE Within a Modular Pharm.D. Course

Nationally, health profession schools continue to focus on developing culturally competent practitioners who can provide evidence-based patient care to diverse patient populations, including members of the LGBTQ community. However, there still remains a lack of knowledge and instruction on how to integrate LGBTQ-focused topics across various professional curricula, including schools of pharmacy. This session describes one institution’s strategy on incorporating LGBTQ-focused topics into a modular Pharm.D. curriculum course utilizing an interprofessional education setting.

(Speaker) Brooklyn Cobb, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Charrell S. Porter, University of the Sciences

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Implementation of a Clinical Case Defense Course in a 3-Year Pharmacy Program

This session will describe the inception and impact of a Clinical Case Defense capstone course designed to improve the skillsets of patient assessment, literature evaluation, ability to answer questions, and overall oral presentations of pharmacy students immediately prior to APPE rotations. We will discuss successes, pitfalls, and best practices for implementing what has become an effective and valuable course in our curriculum.

(Speaker) Jason Alegro, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Kelli Covington, Roosevelt University

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

How to Be the Host With the Most: Key Considerations for Hosting Visiting International Students

As schools of pharmacy continue to expand their global outreach, there has been an increase in non-U.S. students applying to U.S.–based institutions for short term clerkships/placements. Presenters will share their experience coordinating non-U.S. student clinical placements, research placements, and summer programs. Participants will discuss host institution considerations such as visa requirements, logistics, cultural immersion, and engagement with students at the host institution. Target audience: Global Education SIG and Experiential Education Section.

(Speaker) Sarah A. Dascanio; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

0.50 Contact Hour

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Women Leading Big Change

An interactive session with women leaders who have faced and conquered leading big change in their area of pharmacy. This session will bring together leaders from all facets of pharmacy including academia, practice, and advocacy to discuss the changes they championed and what they learned during the experience. The session will be interactive with an initial presentation portion and then time for questions.

(Speaker) Julie A. Johnson, University of Florida; (Speaker) Veronica P. Vernon, Butler University; (Speaker) Raylene M. Rospond, Manchester University; (Speaker) Suzanne Soliman

Pre-Recorded Sessions
These sessions feature pre-recorded, on-demand videos available to view at attendees' convenience.

Addressing Health Care for Vulnerable Populations Through Interprofessional Education

To address health disparities among vulnerable populations and interprofessional education (IPE), The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) developed an Interprofessional Health-Focused Community of Practice (HFCOP), a partnership of faculty representatives from UTEP’s health disciplines and Texas Tech School of Medicine. The HFCOP is focused on implementation of IPE. This session will Illustrate opportunities on how to incorporate care for vulnerable populations (refugee, transgender, and individuals experiencing homelessness) by using an IPE cased-based experience. Members interested in developing vulnerable populations IPE are encouraged to attend.

(Speaker) Margie E. Padilla, The University of Texas at El Paso; (Speaker) Vicki Howe, The University of Texas at El Paso

0.50 Contact Hour

Administering StrengthsFinder is Not Enough: Advancing Professional Development Curricula By Identifying AND Building Student Talents

Administering the StrengthsFinder assessment can result in significant “aha moments” for students. However, without intentional strengths application in curricula, strengths utilization and development may not automatically follow. As the employment market shifts and evolves, students must be prepared to differentiate themselves and provide evidence of their talents. To assist, faculty can craft strengths “touchpoints” within curricula, monitor strengths self-efficacy, and examine data to identify areas where pharmacy students excel and struggle in using their talents/strengths.

(Moderator) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Andrew Traynor, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Robert A. Bechtol, University of Minnesota

All Generations Work the Same? Fake News!

We are currently living in a time when for the first time in history, there are five different generations that make up the current workforce. Compelling data highlighting some of the differences between these generations. This level of diversity provides as many benefits as it does misunderstandings and conflict. The purpose of this session is to highlight the challenges and realities regarding communicating with generational differences. Attendees will walk out from this session with a better understanding of how different generations work and with effective strategies for relating and communicating across generations.

(Speaker) Nicole Marie Perea, Washington State University; (Speaker) Huy T. Hoang, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Andrew A. Yabusaki; (Speaker) Tracy K. Pettinger, Idaho State University

1.00 Contact Hour

Analytics for Experiential Education

One of the primary challenges within experiential education is how to leverage both quantitative and qualitative data to monitor and support students during rotations across numerous sites and types of rotations. This session discusses how to build a comprehensive analytics tool that provides a clear historical and current record of the student across all rotations to target learning deficiencies efficiently and effectively. The session addresses implementation opportunities and challenges for learning analytics in experiential education.

(Speaker) Aaron O. Thomas, University of Florida; (Speaker) Karen Whalen, University of Florida

Coming Full Circle: 360° Assessment Item Review

Writing even a single assessment item can be difficult. What if there were an easier way to formulate items that took the entire instructional and assessment process into consideration? There is, and we can show you how. Learn how to improve you assessment items through a 360° review process. This intentional review process focuses on intentional design and alignment and concludes with a postmortem analysis that prepares the item for future use.

(Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Sarah E. Raake, Sullivan University

0.50 Contact Hour

Congressional 101: The Inner Workings of Capitol Hill & Advocacy

Attendees will get a Congressional 101 on learning the basics of Capitol Hill in D.C. from the budget process to how a bill becomes law. You will also learn how to become an advocate and use your status as a member of a College of Pharmacy to educate members of Congress and their staff. We will take a deeper dive into the staff and committee structure in both the House and Senate.

(Speaker) Jasey C. Cárdenas, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Gina Ryan, Mercer University; (Speaker) Christine M. Klein, Mercer University

Consistency Matters: Maintaining Order in the Midst of Course Coordination Chaos

When asked to coordinate a course, many faculty cringe at the amount of time and effort spent keeping themselves, other instructors, and learners moving toward a common goal. Additionally, maintaining course coordination consistency throughout an entire program appears to be an elusive goal, but is it? This session will review the why's and how's of maintaining course coordination consistency. Attendees will receive a “course coordination handbook” that can be personalized to any course or program.

(Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Sarah E. Raake, Sullivan University

0.50 Contact Hour

Contract or Invitation? Designing a Learner-Centered Syllabus

For better or worse, the syllabus sets the tone for your course and the upcoming semester. Does your syllabus read like a contract: full of legalese, policies, and penalties? Or is it an invitation to students that promises engagement, creativity, and a collaborative learning environment? This mini-session reviews easy-to-implement strategies for designing a syllabus that’s learner-centered and which puts the spotlight squarely on student learning. Design elements for creating infographic-style syllabi will also be discussed.

(Speaker) Zara Risoldi Cochrane, Shenandoah University

Creating Discerning Clinicians: A Model for Longitudinal Literature Evaluation Instruction/Practical Strategies for Writing the Results Section in a Research Report

The purpose of this session is to highlight a thoughtful approach to curricular design to maximize relevance and resource utilization in teaching, assessing, and providing feedback regarding literature evaluation skills, with the goal of developing students into discerning clinicians. We will discuss the structure and rationale regarding our sequence, methods of maintaining relevance to the overall curriculum, and showcase our strategies for individualized assessment and feedback of a large class of students with limited resources. / The text of the results section provides the authors' interpretation of the data shown in tables and figures to provide meaning for the findings. When writing the text, authors are admonished to avoid repeating the data in the text but are not told how to write text that interprets the data. This session will present a strategy for writing the results section using topic sentences. Topic sentences can assist in identifying what data to include in the text and guidance on avoiding repetition of the data. Participants will review example text written with and without a topic sentence then they will create 2 to 3 checklist items to help them when writing.

(Speaker) Evan Williams, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Surajit Dey, Roseman University of Health Sciences / (Moderator) Marion K. Slack, The University of Arizona

0.50 Contact Hour

De-Stigmatization of Mental Health Conditions—Considerations for U.S. Pharmacy Curricula

Psychiatric pharmacy faculty will present coursework examples that may be implemented in pharmacy curricula to increase student exposure to mental illnesses and people affected by them. Increasing familiarity of mental illnesses can reduce stigma and improve practice readiness in students. This session, targeted toward faculty and administrators, will include active learning and conclude with suggestions to better prepare students to work with this population and how these ideas can be implemented at your institution.

(Speaker) Lisa Goldstone, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Suzanne C. Harris, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jolene R. Bostwick, University of Michigan; (Speaker) Charles F. Caley, Western New England University; (Speaker) Marshall E. Cates, Samford University

1.00 Contact Hour

Developing Students to Become Global Leaders

As the globalization of healthcare continues, it is important to enable our students as agents of change on a global scale. This session will describe strategies for developing students into global leaders through the concepts of global mindset and global citizenship and will discuss the outcomes of implementing a global leadership module across three countries. This session is for faculty interested in enhancing global student opportunities and those interested in expanding leadership activities globally.

(Moderator) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Andreia Bruno-Tome, Monash University; (Speaker) Oksana Pyzik, University College London; (Speaker) Sarah A. Dascanio; (Speaker) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) Caroline Welles, University of North Carolina

1.00 Contact Hour

Developing the Future Addiction Treatment Workforce Through Experiential Education

Clinical educators who have developed and precepted innovative advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) which focus on the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) will prepare participants to develop or enhance their own SUD APPEs. Successful strategies for engaging student pharmacists in interprofessional collaboration will be highlighted. The target audience for this activity includes clinical preceptors and experiential education administrators who may be in a position to develop or support the development of SUD APPEs.

(Speaker) Lucas G. Hill, The University of Texas at Austin; (Chair and Speaker) Laura C. Palombi, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Courtenay G. Wilson; (Speaker) Alyssa M. Peckham, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Melinda Ramage, MAHEC OBGYN

1.00 Contact Hour

Development of the Nation’s First Master of Science in Medical Cannabis Science and Therapeutics

This program will describe the development and implementation of the nation's first Master of Science in medical cannabis studies. The M.S. program is designed to foster a deeper knowledge and understanding of the science, clinical therapeutics, and regulatory policy related to medical cannabis. The inaugural class includes health care practitioners, scientists, lawyers, and medical cannabis industry professionals, among others. Challenges and lessons learned will also be discussed.

(Speaker) Leah C. Sera, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Lisa Finn, University of Maryland

Dire Straits to Altered Fates: Enhancing Pharmacy Curricula to Meet Society’s Needs

This session will target faculty, administrators, and preceptors to briefly review the development of previously published learning competencies for urban underserved practice. However, the focus of the presentation will be on identifying opportunities within pharmacy curricula where these learning competencies may be incorporated. The speakers will provide examples within the didactic and experiential curricula to prompt the audience to begin to brainstorm activities that can be mapped to the urban underserved learning competencies.

(Speaker) Christopher Johnson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) James Lokken, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Andrew Traynor, Concordia University Wisconsin

Exploring Career Development Through an Individualized Learning Experience: The Student Directed Practicum

This program targets faculty interested in exploring an alternative mechanism for student career development. The Student Directed Practicum is an optional career development summer experience in which students 1) participate in self-directed experiential learning 2) establish SMART goals, and 3) engage in reflective modules that foster self-awareness and career direction. Attendees will discuss the outcomes of a student directed, faculty facilitated approach towards career exploration and how such an experience can benefit faculty and students.

(Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

0.50 Contact Hour

Fake News? Instructing Learners on CBD and Kratom as Alternatives for OTC Pain Relief

Products containing CBD and kratom have quickly become common in the marketplace and many pharmacists and students, regardless of setting, are increasingly being sought out by patients and healthcare providers to discuss these substances, especially for use in pain. Educators can assist with identification and development of essential skills needed by students to approach these evolving conversations. Implementing educational strategies into the pharmacy curriculum can provide a comprehensive approach to student practice-readiness.

(Speaker) Shawn R. Taylor, Wingate University; (Speaker) Thomas Sayre, Regis University

Five Hundred Days That Shaped the Future of Pharmacy in the United States

Over the next two years the profession of pharmacy will celebrate two important bicentennials, the founding of the United States Pharmacopeia (1820) and the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy (1821). Join us as pharmacy historian, Greg Higby, speaks on the events that lead to the establishment of these two important organizations.

(Speaker) Gregory J. Higby, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) James. M. Culhane, Notre Dame of Maryland University

How Can We Help You? Developing a Multi-Campus Health-System IPPE at Diverse Hospitals

IPPEs contribute to APPE-readiness by providing early patient care experiences in diverse practice settings. Ensuring high-quality experiences and consistent outcomes at hospitals with different practice models is an ongoing challenge. This session discusses strategies for developing and maintaining a longitudinal health-system IPPE program at multiple hospitals across the state through mutually beneficial activities that enhance site-specific patient care services. The intended audience of this presentation is experiential faculty/staff, preceptors, and curriculum administrators.

(Speaker) Andrew Darley, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Misha T. Watts, The University of Georgia

0.50 Contact Hour

Innovative Concepts in Pharmacy Education That Incorporate Augmented Reality to Improve Student Learning Outcomes

Augmented Reality (AR) is predicted to be more fully adopted into all aspects of Pharmacy in the near future. The ubiquity and impressive computing power of modern smartphones can be exploited to provide novel ways to actively engage Pharm.D. students in both lecture and laboratory sessions. The session is aimed at Pharmacy educators interested in learning how to incorporate AR content within either their lecture or laboratory materials.

(Chair) Chase Smith, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Moderator) Ola A. Ghoneim, University of Saint Joseph; (Moderator) Christiane Chbib, Larkin University; (Moderator) Carolyn Friel, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester

IPE Program Development and Assessment in a Non-Medical Center Based College of Pharmacy

Butler University’s Pharmacy Program developed its IPE program with didactic, co-curricular, and experiential activities. An IPE course sequence was developed, co-curricular tracking initiated; reinforced by IPPEs and APPEs. One unique aspect is our cooperation with the Indiana University IPE Practice and Education Center, adopting the IU TEACH! curriculum which allows pharmacy students broad interaction with medical students and other prescribers, as well as a wide range of other healthcare profession students. Assessments will be presented.

(Speaker) Trish Devine, Butler University; (Speaker) Bernadette K. Brown, Butler University

It Takes A Village: Simulated Interprofessional Experiences with a Geriatric Twist

Within the context of geriatrics, students become practice ready to treat this complicated, vulnerable population and effectively work within interprofessional teams. This interactive session will explore ideas on how to develop and implement successful interprofessional education opportunities for students that emphasize geriatric topics and/or include geriatric patients. Attendees will participate in the session through small group brainstorming, sharing ideas collectively online, and contributing to a toolkit that will be distributed via AACP Connect post-meeting.

(Moderator) Tara Storjohann, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Elizabeth K. Pogge, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Michael Nagy, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Stephanie L. Sibicky, Northeastern University

1.00 Contact Hour

It’s PB&J Time! How to Make a Tasty MedChem, Pharmacology and Therapeutics Sandwich

This session will describe techniques utilized by two Doctor of Pharmacy programs to integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacotherapeutics. The program will show how the integrative process facilitates an increase in active learning time through guided inquiry, while maintaining > 80% mastery by the students. Furthermore, challenges inherent and suggestions for improvement in the process of integration will be discussed.

(Speaker) Dana R. Fasanella, University of Maryland Eastern Shore; (Speaker) Nkem Nonyel, University of Maryland Eastern Shore; (Speaker) Frederick R. Tejada, University of Maryland Eastern Shore; (Speaker) Stacy D. Brown, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Patrice L. Jackson-Ayotunde, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

1.00 Contact Hour

Microsession I: Innovative Pedagogy in the Classroom, Laboratory, Recitation and Experiential Sites

Public Service Announcement Video and Social Media Assignment in a Women’s Health Course

Andrea R. Gauld

Conducting “Challenging Conversations” in a Professional Pharmacy Communications Course

Sharon Rush

Microlearning–Max Impact

Kristine Mason

Choosing Your Reality: Incorporating Mixed-Reality Activities Into the Core Curriculum

Davina M. DeVries

Lessons from a Formulary Decision Making and Informatics Activity in a Drug Information Course

Julie Kalabalik-Hoganson

Application of FMEA Risk Analysis in Teaching Pharmaceutical Compounding

Bradley A. Clark

Jigsaw Journal Clubs–Piecing Together Communication and Evaluation

Lauren R. Biehle

A Novel P1 Readiness Program to Orient Incoming Students to the Pharmacy Curriculum

Fawzy A. Elbarbry

It Just Got Real. Equipping Preceptors for Challenging Situations Through Use of a Virtual Student

Charlene Williams

Increasing Classroom Engagement: How to Pop the Right Kind of Question

Kaci A. Bohn

Use of Telepharmacy Technology to Prepare Pharmacy Students to Deliver Health Care to Distant Populations

Jeanne E. Frenzel

Incorporation of Unique Pedagogical Techniques and Assessment Strategies Into a Pharmacogenomics Elective

Jason Guy

Seeking a Non-traditional Pharmacy Career? It All Starts From College

Christiane Chbib

Developing Problem Solving Transfer Through Scaffolded Systematic Approaches to Problem Solving in an Infectious Diseases Therapeutics Course

Conan MacDougall

Dr. M’s Math: Using Brief Video Podcasts to Improve Academic Performance on Pharmaceutical Calculations

Christina Mnatzaganian

Microsession II: Assessment Strategies

Standardized Formative Assessment Tool for High Fidelity Patient Simulations Across Clinical Electives

Liza B. Andrews

The Final Chapter: Using ExamSoft© Rubrics on Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

Lisa M. Meny

Microsession III: Innovative Approaches to Interprofessional Education

Meeting the Patient Where They Are: Interprofessional Home Visits

Ashley Crowl

Move Over Silicon Valley, It Is Time For Silicon Healthcare

Angela Chu

Outbreak!: An Incident Command Team Simulation

Zachary N. Jenkins

Peer to Peer Teaching in IPE: Pharmacy Students as Educators of Medical Students

Louise S. Parent-Stevens

Saving Patient X: Impact of an Interprofessional Escape Room on Teamwork and Performance During Simulation

Nicholas M Fusco

Using Microcredentials in Interprofessional Education

Emily K. Dornblaser

Elder Abuse as a Vector for Interprofessional Education

Deepti Vyas

Using Simulation to Promote Poverty Awareness in Health Professional Students

M. Jeanna Sewell

A Battle Against Mental Illness Stigma

Dongmi Kim

Where Two Roads Meet: Merging Pharmacy Into a Medicine Scholarly Concentration Program

Amy H. Schwartz

Microsession IV: Student Remediation

Coaching Students and Increasing their Accountability Using Documentation

Amanda Galvan

Oh No, They Failed the Rotation! What’s Next?

Janene L. Marshall

One Size Does Not Fit All: Creating an Individualized Remediation Plan in a Pharmacotherapeutics Sequence

Sarah E. Raake

Remediation Strategies for Students With Social-Behavioral Issues in the Experiential Curriculum

Lindsey E. Dayer

When Thinking About Thinking Isn’t Too Much Thinking: The Metacognition Awareness Inventory in Experiential Remediation

Meredith L. Howard

Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall—Which Applicants Are Fairest of Them All?

This session will be of interest to admissions personnel, as the results of a longitudinal research endeavor will be discussed regarding student academic success in the first professional year of a Pharm.D. curriculum. While traditional measures such as pre-matriculation GPA remain predictive, student resiliency, empathy, and critical thinking skills are potential attributes for success. Grit, Jefferson Empathy, HSRT and True Colors assessments will be discussed in relation to P1 academic achievement.

(Speaker) David B. Romerill, The University of Texas at Tyler; (Speaker) Justin Reinert, The University of Texas at Tyler

Mischief Managed Through Different Wizarding Styles: Understanding Teaching Styles and Classroom Management Strategies

Embedded in the Harry Potter series are representations of different teaching styles and pedagogical techniques. Since the series is based on the Hogwarts School and the teachers and students in the school, the novels reflect real problems and issues in the classroom. This session will explore the strengths and weaknesses of teaching styles used by Hogwarts’ faculty as well as classroom management challenges/solutions that pharmacy faculty can reflect on and apply with their students.

(Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin

1.00 Contact Hour

Nailed It! Implementing Learner Self-Awareness Checkpoints in OSCEs

Do you have moments where you wonder, “What was that student thinking?” Or “Are they aware of what they just did?” Student interactions in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) are a natural place to evaluate a learner’s self-awareness. In this session, we will discuss methods to implement self-awareness activities throughout an OSCE program by administering a “Nailed it/Failed it” tool. Examples of feedback for both the over- and under-confident student will be shared.

(Speaker) Sarah E. Raake, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Katie F. Leslie, Sullivan University

0.50 Contact Hour

Non-Traditional Funding Sources for Pharmaceutical Science Research

Tenure-track science faculty often struggle with developing extramurally-funded research projects. This is particularly true for faculty in teaching-focused schools which do not offer Ph.D. degree programs. This session will explore non-traditional funding sources for pharmaceutical science research, discuss best practices, and showcase successful examples.

(Speaker) Fang Zhao, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Ronny Priefer, MCPHS University–Boston; (Moderator) Asish K. Dutta, Notre Dame of Maryland University

Opioid-Related Activities in Academic Pharmacy: Review and Update

AACP launched the Opioid-Related Activity Database in February 2019. The database has since grown to 450 activities, submitted by 108 institutions. These activities encompass areas in education, research, service, practice, and advocacy. This session will provide an overview of activities at schools and highlight research and important findings from the data collection.

(Speaker) Thomas Maggio, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Pharmacy Skills Experts Define Essential Skills for Pharmacy Graduates

This session will report the results of a national study answering the questions, “what do students need to know and do related to community, health-system, ambulatory care, and managed care at entry to practice.” Laboratory skills experts from across the country participated in a Delphi process used to develop a list of essential skills needed for each practice setting. The Delphi and results will be described and a call to action to pharmacy educators made.

(Speaker) Jeanne E. Frenzel, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Kimberley J. Begley, Creighton University; (Speaker) Courtney L. Bradley, High Point University; (Speaker) Brittany L. Riley, Marshall University; (Speaker) Brandon Nuziale, Pacific University Oregon

1.00 Contact Hour

Reports of the 2019-2020 Standing Committees

The session provides interested attendees an opportunity to interact with the standing committees: Academic Affairs, Argus Commission, Professional Affairs, Research and Graduate Affairs, Strategic Engagement, and Student Affairs. Following brief presentations by committee chairs on the key recommendations contained in the report, discussions on the reports and implementation strategies will be led by committee members.

RoboIPE: Using Telepresence Robots for Multi-site Campuses in Interprofessional Education

Interprofessional education (IPE) remains a challenge for health professions schools across multiple campuses and in rural settings. This session will describe using telepresence robots to increase participation in high fidelity simulation for IPE as students across a state practice communication in telehealth scenarios. The intended audience includes those interested in incorporating IPE or telepresence robots into their curriculum. Educators will actively learn about the implementation challenges, student evaluation results, and recommendations to address these.

(Speaker) Nicole S Young, University of Hawaii at Hilo; (Speaker) Sheri M. Tokumaru, University of Hawaii at Hilo

Seeking Enhanced Learner Engagement? Have You Tried Vulnerability?

In her 2010 TED Talk, Brené Brown described vulnerability as the practice of uncertainty, risk and emotional exposure. What is the evidence surrounding vulnerability and student engagement? How can this practice address CAPE Domain 4: Personal and Professional Development? This session will discuss vulnerability as a way to engage learners and how to model this behavior for learners. Attendees will identify ways to express vulnerability as well as create a learning environment that fosters vulnerability.

(Speaker) Vibhuti Amirfar, St. John's University; (Speaker) Macary W. Marciniak, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Susan S. Vos, The University of Iowa

1.00 Contact Hour

Selling Your Educational Expertise: Creating an Instructional Design Service Center

Ever sit in a cross-campus meeting and hear, “You guys in pharmacy do _________ so well”? Whether that blank is assessment, curricular mapping, experiential education, student advising or online education, that statement could identify a marketable service. This session will present the University of Colorado’s move toward an instructional design fee-for-service center model after other programs on campus recognized the School of Pharmacy’s expertise in online education.

(Speaker) Lisha R. Bustos; (Speaker) Kari L. Franson, University of Southern California

SPEECing of EPAs: Development and Implementation of EPA-based Experiential Curricula Across Multiple Schools of Pharmacy

The Southeastern Pharmacy Experiential Education Consortium (SPEEC) recently transitioned to hybrid EPA and competency-based syllabi and evaluations for APPEs for six schools of pharmacy. This interactive session will focus on the comprehensive, team-based process used to develop syllabi, evaluation tools, and preceptor training modules. This program will reveal lessons learned and key take-away points that will be of interest to the target audience of faculty involved in curriculum, pharmacy practice, and experiential education.

(Speaker) Christine M. Klein, Mercer University; (Speaker) Andrew Darley, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Lynn Stevenson, Auburn University; (Speaker) James W. Fetterman, South University; (Speaker) Misha T. Watts, The University of Georgia

1.00 Contact Hour

Strategies to Reinforce Mathematical Skills Among Pharm.D. Students

Anecdotal evidence suggest that mathematical skills are inherently week for the students entering pharmacy program. However, approximately, one-third of the NAPLEX content includes questions pertaining to calculations. This section strives to incorporate strategies to enhance student comprehension of mathematical and analytical skills. In addition, this session will also attempt to explore ways for improving student compounding and dispensing skills that are needed in the pharmacy practice settings.

(Speaker) Krishna Kumar, Howard University; (Speaker) Tommy C. Morris, Xavier University of Louisiana; (Speaker) Rajesh Vadlapatla, Marshall B. Ketchum University; (Moderator) Asish Dutta, Notre Dame of Maryland University

1.00 Contact Hour

Teaching is Teaching: Does Discipline Really Make a Difference?

There is science behind learning and good teaching utilizes this to design instruction. However, there is often debate (and even AACP programming) centered around the differences between teaching “science” and “practice” within pharmacist training. Is teaching different disciplines that different? Could we synergize efforts by facilitating critical thinking, including making connections across disciplines, to enhance learner development? This session will focus on these questions and apply the science of learning to various avenues of instruction.

(Speaker) Daniel R. Kennedy, Western New England University; (Speaker) Lindsay E. Davis, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1.00 Contact Hour

The Assessment Hat (or Hats!) We All Wear: Assessment Across an Array of Faculty Roles

Faculty wear multiple hats as pharmacy educators and one example is in assessment, since it is an area of shared responsibility among all faculty. This session will characterize common “hats” faculty wear in assessment (e.g., exam item writing, rubric development, assessing teaching). Participants will learn how assessment practices extend across various faculty roles, including those with or without formal assessment titles, and gain practical strategies to adapt to their own faculty role.

(Speaker) Jacqueline M. Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma

1.00 Contact Hour

The Little Search Engine That Could: Literature Appraisal and Data Synthesis Skills for APPE Readiness

This session highlights a creative interdepartmental approach used in a hybrid IPPE course. Adding to traditional teaching methods, faculty utilize an escape room and literature searching modules to incorporate skills needed to execute a literature review. Using a clinical question, students are guided through a controlled patient scenario to locate and appraise research. This preparation is integral to fostering information retention, APPE readiness, and long-term success as educated consumers and producers of biomedical literature.

(Speaker) Brook Amen, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Cheng Yuet, JPS Health Network

Two Early Adopters of Learning Analytics in Pharmacy Education

The session is intended for members of the academy who are involved with or interested in assessment activities at their institution and how to efficiently employ learning and program analytics for the benefit of the student learning and program quality. Two schools will address the challenges and opportunities of leveraging just-in-time analytics to support student success, programmatic assessment, and accreditation requirements. The session also addresses the financial and organizational resources required to implement learning analytics.

(Speaker) Aaron O. Thomas, University of Florida; (Speaker) Gina C. Craft, The University of Louisiana at Monroe; (Moderator) Shauna M. Buring, University of Florida

Unprofessional Behavior: Stories from the Road

Experiential Education administrators from three schools of pharmacy share stories of unprofessional student behavior from their 40+ years of working in experiential education. Scenarios will be presented and will include the resolution and any process or policy changes implemented to avoid similar unprofessional behavior in the future. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss how they would handle each situation, share their own experiences and learn how to take a proactive approach to professional issues.

(Speaker) Trish Devine, Butler University; (Speaker) Maryann Z. Skrabal, Creighton University; (Speaker) Kim D. Tanzer, Western New England University

1.00 Contact Hour

Use of a Warm Hand-off Interprofessional Simulation to Model Asynchronous and Patient-Centered Teamwork

Traditionally, most IPE simulations are in synchronous team settings, but a large portion of outpatient-based healthcare occurs asynchronously. Best practices for asynchronous teamwork involves an interprofessional communication technique called a warm hand-off. Warm hand-offs integrate and coordinate care between healthcare providers while including the patient. This session will introduce warm hand-offs, describe a warm hand-off evaluation checklist, and share the components and results of a warm hand-off simulation with pharmacy and social work students.

(Speaker) Amy D. Robertson, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas

0.50 Contact Hour

You've Got Challenges—We've Got Solutions. Developing a Process to Manage Challenges Encountered by Experiential Education Administrators

Pharmacy practice experiences have increased and now account for 35% or more of pharmacy curricula. These experiences are valuable components in the development of student pharmacists. However, they come with challenges for students and their preceptors that are often time-consuming for experiential administrators and difficult to manage. This session will describe findings from a two-year study conducted at three institutions about the reported issues and applied solutions to preceptor and student reported issues.

(Speaker) Charlene Williams, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Lisa M. Dinkins, Wingate University; (Speaker) Wesley R. Haltom, Wingate University; (Speaker) Kathryn Paige D. Brown, Campbell University; (Speaker) Lana M. Minshew

1.00 Contact Hour