Pharmacy Education 2022 - Programming

Pharmacy Education 2022 Cityburst logo

Pre-Sessions

All Programming is Subject to Change.

Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG Program

Fee: $300; $250 with full conference registration. Pre-registration recommended.

View Schedule

All times listed below are in Central Daylight Time.

Saturday, July 23

10:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG Program

Pre-registration required

Ft. Worth 1, 2

The Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG program is designed for administrative and financial officers, as well as other AACP participants interested in key administrative, financial, and leadership issues that influence the operations of colleges of pharmacy. This half-day program will provide participants the opportunity to engage in meaningful discussions regarding communication, risk management, and other areas of responsibility within the Finance and Administration role, as well as hot topics in the world of finance and operations.

10:00 a.m.–10:50 a.m.

Executive Committee Meeting 

If you are new to the AFO-SIG, your role, or this conference, please join the Executive and Education Committee members for a casual meet and greet session.

11:00 a.m.–11:25 a.m.

Newcomer’s Session

If you are new to the AFO-SIG, your role, or this conference, please join the Executive and Education Committee members for a casual meet and greet session.

11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m. 

AFO SIG Program Lunch and Rapid-Fire Items

SIG Updates, Installation of New Officers, etc. with Rapid Fire Topics to facilitate an open room discussion with attendees first at their respective tables and then with the attending group.

1:30 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Assessing Strategic Plans for ACPE Accreditation Standards

Mercer University recently received accolades from their ACPE accreditation reviewers for their strategic plan. This program will hear from two schools that used the same consultant to construct and assess strategic plans to meet ACPE accreditation standards. The program will focus on similarities and differences on how these two schools developed their strategic plan, assessed their strategic plan and lessons learned over the last 5 years.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. How to develop a strategic plan that meets ACPE Accreditation Standards.  
  2. How to assess strategic plans that meet ACPE Accreditation Standards.  
  3. Lessons learned from managing these new strategic plan processes.

(Speaker) Robert E. Lamb, MBA, Director of Finance and Administration, Mercer University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Dale E. Rush, CGFM, Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs, UIC College of Pharmacy

3:00 p.m.– 4:20 p.m.

Focus Topics

Guided roundtable discussions to focus on HR issues. Such topics will include the increasingly remote workspace and retention efforts, both internal and external to our institutions. These extended discussions will focus on active learning, best practices, and key takeaways to bring back strategies to our colleges and schools.

Admissions Workshop: Recruitment and Admissions for Future Generations

Fee: $375; $325 with full conference registration. Pre-registration is recommended.

View Schedule

All times listed below are in Central Daylight Time.

Thursday, July 21

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

PharmCAS Advisory Committee Meeting

Closed meeting.

Ft. Worth 1, 2

(Chair) Jennifer Clutter, M.A., Program Coordinator, West Virginia University

Friday, July 22

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Friday Continental Breakfast

Grapevine Pre-function

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Admissions Workshop Registration & Help Desk

Center Pre-function

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for the Admissions Workshop 2022. Staff will be available to answer your general Admissions Workshop questions.

8:00 a.m.–8:15 a.m.

Opening Remarks and Welcome

Grapevine C

(Speaker) Donald Godwin, Ph.D., Dean, Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of New Mexico

8:15 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Keynote Address: Higher Education’s Great Upheaval: Implications and Strategies for Pharmacy Education

Grapevine C

The U.S. is in the midst of a profound transformation. As the world shifts to an increasingly interconnected knowledge economy, the forces of technological innovation, globalization, and demographic change create vast new challenges, opportunities, and uncertainties. In this great upheaval, institutions are at a crossroads. Scott Van Pelt will highlight the key findings from his book, “The Great Upheaval: Higher Education's Past, Present, and Uncertain Future,” focusing on the implications for pharmacy education.

(Speaker) Scott Van Pelt, M.A., Ed.M., Associate Director, Wharton Communication Program, University of Pennsylvania

9:30 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Break 1

Grapevine Pre-function

9:45 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Panel Discussion: Promoting the Profession to Generation Z and Beyond

Grapevine C

This session will provide a brief overview of the recruitment challenges faced in recent years and focus on strategies to effectively recruit applicants. As a profession, we must adapt to generational changes and optimize recruiting while adjusting to the ever-changing landscape created by the pandemic and other unforeseen future challenges. The panel will highlight strategies preferred by Gen Z students including messaging, appealing means of contact, effective methods of outreach, and promotion of the profession.

(Moderator) Dale English, II, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Julie Olenak, Wilkes University; (Speaker) Cameron Chock, Resident, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Jaccie Hisashima, Student Pharmacist, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Mi Lam, Student Pharmacist, University of North Texas Health Science Center

10:15 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Roundtable Discussion: Best Practices for Promoting Pharm4Me to Current and Future Generations

Grapevine C

Pharmacy is Right for Me (Pharm4Me) is an educational campaign promoting the profession of pharmacy through a website and social media platforms. The website hosts a number of resources for students to independently access and recruitment tools for schools of pharmacy to utilize. This roundtable session will seek examples of best practices to optimize the use of Pharm4Me as a recruiting tool and to promote the profession of pharmacy.

(Moderator) Julie Olenak, Pharm.D., Assistant Dean of Admissions and Student Affairs, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Wilkes University

10:45 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Break 2

Grapevine Pre-function

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Micro-sessions: Recruitment Strategies to Build a Diverse Pipeline

Grapevine C

Presentations will briefly describe innovative pipeline development programs designed to recruit students from diverse backgrounds.

(Moderator) Susan S. Vos, Pharm.D., FAPhA, Associate Dean of Student Affairs, The University of Iowa

Creating excitement about the pharmacy profession through a peer-mentored online course for diverse student populations

(Speaker) Patricia L. Darbishire, Pharm.D., Associate Dean Academic Affairs and Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University

Partnering with Pre-Health Careers High School Programs

(Speaker) Jason McDowell, B.A., Outreach & Admission Advisor, California Northstate University

Longitudinal culture of support through ASPIR2E: A recruitment and retention initiative focused on diverse populations

(Speaker) Amanda Galindo, Ed.D., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Texas A&M University Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy

Using Holistic Admissions Processes to Help Meet Diversity Goals

(Speaker) Paul Jungnickel, Ph.D., M.S., B.S.Pharm., Associate Dean for Academic Programs, Auburn University

Using Holistic Admissions Processes in Admitting a Diverse Cohort

(Speaker) Krystal L. Ward, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, The University of New Mexico

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Friday Lunch

Grapevine Pre-function

1:30 p.m.–2:10 p.m.

Student Pharmacists in Game Development for Middle Schoolers To Inspire a Pharmacy Career

Grapevine C

Pharmacists offer a distinct value to the development of technology related to healthcare. In this presentation, we will review how student pharmacists from the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy engaged in the development of a virtual pharmacy-based game to recruit future generations of student pharmacists.

(Speaker) Ravi Patel, Pharm.D., Lead Innovation Advisor, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker); Benjamin Johnson, Student Pharmacist, University of Pittsburgh

1:30 p.m.–2:10 p.m.

An Inclusive Process for the Development of Standardized Admissions Interview Questions

Grapevine A

Holistic admission is a strategy to assess the unique characteristics and experiences, plus traditional metrics, to identify applicants who will succeed in the program and profession. This presentation will focus on a process to develop standardized interview questions to strengthen the holistic admissions process, promote inclusion, and emphasize the institution's commitment to diversity. This consensus-driven approach was assessed for appropriateness and inclusivity and engaged faculty to identify the important characteristics needed for future pharmacists.

(Speaker) Teresa Cavanaugh, Pharm.D., M.S., Assistant Dean & Clinical Associate Professor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Tyisha Hathorn, M.S., Ph.D., MBA, Associate Director of Admissions, University of Florida; (Speaker) Jessica Huston, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Florida

2:10 p.m.–2:20 p.m.

Break 3

Grapevine Pre-function

2:20 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Triangulating Best Practices to Advance Diverse Admissions Outcomes

Grapevine C

Participants will be able to identify intentionally inclusive strategies across outreach and recruitment, admissions, and retention that effectively advance outcomes for more a diverse admissions model.

(Moderator) Dale English, II, R.Ph., B.S.Pharm., Pharm.D., FASHP, Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Sullivan University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) Skyller Walkes, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion and Assistant Professor of Instruction, The University of Texas at Austin

3:00 p.m.–3:20 p.m.

Break 4

Grapevine Pre-function

3:20 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Measuring Success in Holistic Pharmacy School Admissions

Grapevine C

Holistic admissions review involves the consideration of an applicant’s unique experiences in addition to the traditional measurements of academic achievements. Many schools have developed methods that quantify or incorporate non-traditional variables to fairly and equitably weigh these various components. Studies have examined the correlation between objective variables and first-year success. However, success can extend beyond GPAs. The presentation will consider traditional and unique ways to measure success and the factors that contribute to it.

(Speaker) Thomas TenHoeve, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Student Affairs, University of Illinois Chicago; (Speaker) Steven Stoner, Pharm.D., BCPP, Clinical Professor and Associate Dean for Student Affairs, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Susan S. Vos, Pharm.D., FAPhA, Associate Dean of Student Affairs, The University of Iowa

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Admission Roundtable Discussion

Grapevine C

Attendees will participate in roundtable discussions on the topics of (1) priority application deadlines and the absence of early decision, (2) measuring the quality of applicants in the absence of the PCAT, and (3) determining the impact of COVID-19 on admissions yield. The purpose of the session is to give attendees the opportunity to discuss and share ideas on these selected topics.

(Moderator) Steven Stoner, Pharm.D., BCPP, Clinical Professor and Associate Dean for Student Affairs, University of Missouri-Kansas City

4:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Center Pre-function

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2022. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions and assist with the AACP meeting app.

5:00 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Day 1 Wrap-Up

Grapevine C

(Speaker) Donald Godwin, Ph.D., Dean, Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of New Mexico

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Networking Event

Sponsored by:

Grapevine Pre-function

6:30 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Admissions Workshop Advisory Committee Dinner

Closed meeting.

TBD


Saturday, July 23

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Saturday Continental Breakfast

Grapevine Pre-function

8:00 a.m.–8:15 a.m.

Welcome Back

Grapevine C

(Speaker) Donald Godwin, Ph.D., Dean, Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of New Mexico

8:15 a.m.–9:15 a.m.

Reasonable Accommodations and Technical Standards in Pharmacy Education

Grapevine C

The session will describe the legal issues associated with providing reasonable accommodations to pharmacy students with physical, cognitive, psychiatric, or other disabilities. The speaker will discuss the importance of technical standards in ensuring equal access to the program, student success, and patient safety. Attendees will engage in case study discussions and learn about best practices to inform the institution’s responses to ADA disclosures and accommodation requests.

(Moderator) Thomas TenHoeve, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Student Affairs, University of Illinois Chicago; (Speaker) Diane Ginsburg, Ph.D., M.S., R.Ph., FASHP, Associate Dean for Healthcare Partnerships, Clinical Professor of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Texas at Austin

9:15 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Break 5

Grapevine Pre-function

9:30 a.m.–10:10 a.m.

Prospective Student Behavior Regarding Pharm.D. Program Selection

Grapevine C

As prospective student cohorts apply to fewer Pharm.D. programs per year, institutions must match their messaging to applicant behavior and consider what motivates future students when choosing which Pharm.D. programs. We will explore the usual intentions of prospective students during this high-stakes decision-making process. Special attention will be paid to the nuanced needs of diverse populations when developing admissions pipelines. Attendees will learn to differentiate their program by enhancing specific parts of their recruitment strategy.

(Speaker) Shane C. Pruitt, Ed.D., Recruitment Specialist, The University of Georgia

9:30 a.m.–10:10 a.m.

Refilling the Pool: Experience Recruiting Applicants from Outside of the Traditional Pharmacy Pipeline

Grapevine A

The session will describe the experience of two pilot programs with recruiting applicants outside of PharmCAS via Liaison’s new Explore Health Careers Program. The presenters will focus on the practical processes associated with implementation, considerations while identifying applicants to other programs at the same institution, strategies to successfully solicit applications, and approaches to championing this program at your institution. Additionally, the program will address barriers to implementation while highlighting specific examples.

(Speaker) Dustin Christensen-Grant, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Michael Dietrich, Pharm.D., BCPS, FAzPA, Associate Dean of Professional Affairs, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University

10:10 a.m.–10:20 a.m.

Break 6

Grapevine Pre-function

10:20 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Following Our Own Advice: Applying Student Wellness Strategies to Recruitment and Admission Staff

Grapevine C

Recruitment and admission work is not for the faint of heart and often results in higher burnout and turnover rates than other student affairs or administrative roles. Virtual events with low participation, fear of illness, and high pressure to perform are causing a perfect storm for staff. This presentation will provide an overview of the eight dimensions of wellness and actionable strategies to promote resiliency, retention, and job satisfaction that enhance personal and organizational outcomes.

(Speaker) Rocke DeMark, Ed.D., Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Chapman University; (Speaker) Amy Diepenbrock, Ph.D., Associate Dean, University of the Incarnate Word Feik School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, Pharm.D., Ed.D.c., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Chicago State University

10:20 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

The Promise and Challenges of Situational Judgement Tests in Admissions

Grapevine A

Identifying and evaluating non-academic constructs in students applying to health sciences programs are goals of many admissions committees. Situational judgment tests (SJTs) are an emerging assessment strategy in health professions education that overcome the limitations of many assessment methods. SJTs were developed to assess social and behavioral aspects of students. This session will focus on the promise and challenges of SJTs and will include evidence-based experiences related to their use in health professions education.

(Speaker) Wendy C. Cox, Pharm.D., BCPS, Vice Dean for Professional Education, Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Curriculum Innovation and Assessment, High Point University School of Dental Medicine

11:00 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Break 7

Grapevine Pre-function

11:15 a.m.–11:55 a.m.

Micro-sessions: Strategic Partnerships to Promote the Profession

Grapevine C

Presentations will describe innovative partnerships with institutions and organizations to recruit and enroll students into a professional or graduate program or inspire students about the pharmacy profession.

(Moderator) Julie Olenak, Pharm.D., Assistant Dean of Admissions and Student Affairs, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Wilkes University

Geisinger Pharmacy Scholars Program: A Strategic Partnership Between Wilkes University and Geisinger

(Speaker) Julie Olenak, Pharm.D., Assistant Dean of Admissions and Student Affairs, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Wilkes University

Changing Perceptions of Pharmacy through an Undergraduate Exploratory Course at a Partner Institution

(Speaker) Katie F. Leslie, Ph.D., M.S., Associate Professor; Director, Enrollment and Community Outreach, Sullivan University

Stronger Together: Statewide Initiative to increase the awareness of pharmacy as a career

(Speaker) Tyisha Hathorn, M.S., Ph.D., M.B.A., Associate Director of Admissions, University of Florida

11:55 a.m.–Noon

Day #2 Wrap Up

Grapevine C

(Speaker) Donald Godwin, Ph.D., Dean, Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of New Mexico

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Saturday Lunch

Grapevine Pre-function

1:30 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

CAS Roadmap

Grapevine C

This session will review both newly released and upcoming CAS features and functions on the Liaison roadmap.

(Speaker) Deborah H. Erdner, Vice President, Operations, Liaison International

2:15 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Break 8

Grapevine Pre-function

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Finding Prospects and Matriculating Applicants Through Advanced Analytics (sponsored session)

Grapevine C

Learn how Liaison’s “Intelligent Names” solution can help you find prospective students with a high propensity for continuing education, and understand how a predictive analytics solution can drive applicants to enrolling in your institution.

(Speaker) Zach Varga, Liaison International

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Engage. Recruit. Enroll. Bringing your Marketing Strategy to Life (sponsored session)

Grapevine A

Pharmacy programs have been forced to re-think their marketing strategies to effectively recruit from a shrinking pool. This session will share how some pharmacy schools have deployed a new marketing platform and services to bring their strategy to life. The result? Increased response and yield rates. Learn the keys to execute an immediate, relevant, automated and trackable marketing strategy, from first interest to first day, to help you build a better class.

(Speaker) Suzanne Sharp, Liaison International

3:00 p.m.–3:10 p.m.

Break 9

Grapevine Pre-function

3:10 p.m.–3:40 p.m.

Exploring Emails

Grapevine C

This session will cover all aspects of emailing applicants in WebAdMIT, including best practices for managing email templates and reviewing applicant receipt.

(Speaker) Gwen Chretien, Ed.S., Director of Admissions, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Jennifer Raab, Learning Experience Designer, Education & Knowledge, Liaison International 

3:10 p.m.–3:40 p.m.

Point Tables/Scoring

Grapevine A

This session will cover what to do after implementing a review process, including how to expand on that process using WebAdMIT tools such as point tables and scoring.

(Speaker) Jennifer Clutter, M.A., Program Coordinator, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Nicole Iarossi, Client Success Manager, Liaison International; (Speaker) Deborah H. Erdner, Vice President, Operations, Liaison International

3:40 p.m.–3:50 p.m.

Break 10

Grapevine Pre-function

3:50 p.m.–4:20 p.m.

Lists/List Manager

Grapevine C

This session will cover how to group and manage applicants by common criteria using lists. Once you create a list, you can access it as needed and perform various actions. Lists are dynamic and update as your applicant pool changes. The List Manager allows you to create field lists based on data from the application and composite lists based on existing field lists.

(Speaker) Krystal L. Ward, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, The University of New Mexico; (Speaker) Jennifer Raab, Learning Experience Designer, Education & Knowledge, Liaison International 

3:50 p.m.–4:20 p.m.

Working with Prerequisite GPAs

Grapevine A

This session will cover the Prerequisite GPAs feature that allows users to create a set of prerequisite courses and match them for each applicant. In this session, both applicant-selected and program-selected prerequisites will be covered.

(Speaker) Jonathan Parker, M.A., Ed.S., Director of Pharmacy Admission, Samford University; (Speaker) Nicole Iarossi, Client Success Manager, Liaison International; (Speaker) Deborah H. Erdner, Vice President, Operations, Liaison International

4:20 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Break 11

Grapevine Pre-function

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Analytics by Liaison

Grapevine C

This session will highlight Analytics by Liaison, which provides authorized users at colleges and schools of pharmacy with an interactive and visual representation of their local applicant pool for multi-year data analysis and reporting.

(Speaker) Amy Diepenbrock, Ph.D., Associate Dean, University of the Incarnate Word Feik School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Ashley Rodriguez, M.B.A., Manager of Enrollment and Alumni Services, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Jennifer Raab, Learning Experience Designer, Education & Knowledge, Liaison International 

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Local GPAs

Grapevine A

This session will cover Local GPAs, which are customized GPAs from all classes in desired subject areas, classifications, and academic years. Once a Local GPA is configured, each applicant has a GPA calculated based on their applicable classes.

(Speaker) Jonathan Parker, M.A., Ed.S., Director of Pharmacy Admission, Samford University; (Speaker) Deborah H. Erdner, Vice President, Operations, Liaison International; (Speaker) Nicole Iarossi, Client Success Manager, Liaison International

NASPA Pharmacy-Based Point-of-Care Test & Treat National Certificate Program

Fee: Certificate Program: $350, Train-the-Trainer: complimentary with certificate program registration.

Pre-registration required.

Certificate Program: Saturday, July 23 - 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. CDT

Train-the-Trainer Program: Saturday, July 23 -5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m. CDT

These back-to-back programs offer pharmacy schools a practical way to begin offering the NASPA POCT&T Certificate program as part of the PharmD curriculum. Point-of-care testing empowers clinicians to use effective, fast technology to aid their decision making at the “point-of-care” to improve patient health. Pharmacy-based point-of-care testing utilizes CLIA-waived (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments -waived) tests that offer near immediate results in non-laboratory settings. Pharmacists and pharmacies are increasingly offering this public health service to promote prevention, early detection, and disease management.

View the certificate program agenda.


Teachers' Seminar: Simple Approaches to Complex Teaching and Learning Challenges

Fee: Member $300; Non-member $400; Student: $125.

With full conference registration: Member $250; Non-member $350; Student: $75.

Pre-registration recommended.

View Schedule

All times listed below are in Central Daylight Time.

The day will include large group sessions at the beginning, middle, and end of the day, as well as smaller breakout sessions throughout. Each breakout session addresses one topic, and the topics are related to one of four content themes.

You can choose to focus solely on one content theme and attend all four breakout sessions related to that theme, or you can pick and choose from different content themes and attend whichever sessions are most appealing to you. The breakout sessions are stand-alone sessions; they do not build on one another. Several sessions are offered twice; but some are only offered once.

Visual matrix of the Teachers' Seminar schedule by theme.

Saturday, July 23

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Teachers' Seminar Breakfast

Grapevine Pre-function

Breakfast

8:30 a.m.–9:20 a.m.

Introduction and Keynote: Less, Not Loss

Grapevine D

Our natural approach to solving problems is to “add”, which contributes to increased complexity of our world. This can leave us feeling overwhelmed with many facets of our lives including work and career, family and friends, and health and wellbeing. The challenges from the pandemic in the workplace have added another layer of complexity including changes in communication and education models, workload, and work-life balance. The keynote session will highlight issues of increased complexity from multiple perspectives including that of the student, faculty, and curriculum. Attendees will identify complexities they face and consider a framework to solve, simplify, or subtract.

“Genius is making complex ideas simple; not making simple ideas complex.” - Albert Einstein

“Everything should be made as simple as possible; but not simpler.” - Albert Einstein

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify complexities faculty members and students face.
  2. Describe a mindset-focused framework for reducing complexity.

0581-0000-22-039-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jennifer Trujillo, Pharm.D., BCPS, FCCP, CDCES, BC-ADM, Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus; (Speaker) Tina Brock, B.S.Pharm., M.S., Ed.D., Associate Dean for Education, Professor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus; (Speaker) Jeff Cain, Ed.D., M.S., Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Adam Persky, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

9:30 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Shining an Inclusive Light: Addressing Blind Spots

Grapevine D

A blind spot is something about yourself and/or your actions that you don’t see clearly or are afraid to acknowledge. Since blind spots can impair decision making, it is important to understand what blind spots are, their influence on different types of biases, and learn strategies to be more self aware. This session will discuss techniques to help you identify and address your blind spots, and evaluate approaches to facilitate self-exploration and inclusive conversations.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the concepts of projection bias and false consensus effect.
  2. Discuss the Johari window and its potential for nurturing self-awareness.
  3. Address your blind spots through the creation of a self-awareness improvement plan.

0581-0000-22-040-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Lakesha M. Butler, Pharm.D., Professor, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

9:30 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Experiential/Small-Group Teaching

Simple Communication Tools: How to Understand and Be Understood

Grapevine B

This session will focus on communication styles, key characteristics of different styles, and tips for communicating with team members or leading a team, based on communication preferences. During this session, attendees will complete a communication preference self-assessment and review their preferred communication style. Attendees will then apply this knowledge to two communication focused scenarios.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize the impact of faculty incivility on productivity and work satisfaction.
  2. Identify key characteristics of different communication styles.
  3. Apply knowledge of communication styles to case scenarios with faculty-to-faculty conflict.

0581-0000-22-041-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jennifer Trujillo, Pharm.D., BCPS, FCCP, CDCES, BC-ADM, Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus; (Speaker) Sara A. Wettergreen, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

9:30 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Professional Development/Personal Wellbeing

Well-Being Through the Eyes of a Canine

Texas 1, 2, 3

Dogs live each moment to their fullest. They don’t think about yesterday or about tomorrow. They listen to their main needs at the moment. Dr. Martin Seligman describes the five building blocks to live a flourishing life. The PERMA approach (positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishments) will be discussed as they are linked to intrinsic motivation that can contribute to well-being. Research has shown significant positive associations between each of the PERMA components and physical health, vitality, job satisfaction, and commitment within organizations. It is also a predictor of psychological stress. This session will provide practical strategies for well-being inspired and modeled through the eyes of our furry friends.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Use techniques to retrain the brain to boost happiness and well-being.
  2. Explore the five building blocks of well-being that can strengthen positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning and accomplishments.

0581-0000-22-041-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Seena L. Haines, Pharm.D., BCACP, NBC-HWC, CHWC, FASHP, FAPhA, FCCP, FNAP, RYT200, Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Jenny Van Amburgh, Pharm.D., R.Ph., FAPhA, FNAP, BCACP, CDCES, Clinical Professor / Assistant Dean, SOPPS Office of Student Affairs, Northeastern University

9:30 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Classroom Teaching

Making it Stick: Simple Lessons from Small Teaching

Texas 4, 5, 6

This session will focus on brief classroom or virtual learning activities that can easily be added or incorporated into existing courses. These strategies can be one-time interventions or repeated across a course or curriculum and include small tweaks in course design or interactions with learners. Strategies discussed include predicting, interleaving, connecting, and practicing, among others. While helpful, attendees are not required to read Small Teaching prior to attending. The strategies and takeaways are modular in nature and can be used anywhere in a curriculum where an instructor is willing to deploy them.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Apply lessons and recommendations from Small Teaching related to didactic interventions.
  2. Formulate a plan for incorporating ideas from Small Teaching in classroom activities.

0581-0000-22-043-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor, The University of Oklahoma

10:15 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Teachers' Seminar Networking Break

Grapevine Pre-function

10:30 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Simple Strategies to Create an Equity-minded Classroom

Grapevine D

Students come from different backgrounds and bring unique identities and learning styles to the classroom. Giving each student an equitable chance to succeed is essential to a productive learning environment. This session will define educational equity and discuss simple, meaningful strategies to help create and foster equity in the classroom.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explore strategies for using equity to create an inclusive classroom environment.
  2. Develop a plan to implement one of the strategies.

0581-0000-22-044-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Sally A. Arif, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCP, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University

10:30 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Professional Development/Personal Wellbeing

Live Like a Stoic: The Stoic Compass and the Happiness Triangle

Grapevine B

How can Stoicism help us to live better, happier lives today? Stoicism is a school of philosophy that hails from ancient Greece and Rome in the early parts of the 3rd century, BC. It is a philosophy of life that maximizes positive emotions, reduces negative emotions, and helps individuals hone their virtues of character. We fret about things we can do nothing about and fail to act on what is under our control. Living like a Stoic for a week, on average, leads to a 14% reduction in negative emotions and a 13% increase in overall life satisfaction. The Stoic Happiness Triangle explains the philosophy of Stoicism in a simple and visual way. We often act irrationally; we do not live a life according to Nature (rationality). Eudaimonia is at the core of Stoicism—to be at good terms (eu) with your inner diamond and in harmony with your highest self. Stoicism is a framework for thinking rationally and ethically about how to lead a good life.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explore how the Stoic Happiness Triangle can lead to personal and professional fulfillment.
  2. Discuss the “I” virtues (wisdom, justice, courage, and moderation) and “We” virtues (nurturance, liberality, kindness and altruism) as a path for leading a flourishing life.

0581-0000-22-045-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Seena L. Haines, Pharm.D., BCACP, NBC-HWC, CHWC, FASHP, FAPhA, FCCP, FNAP, RYT200, Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Jenny Van Amburgh, Pharm.D., R.Ph., FAPhA, FNAP, BCACP, CDCES, Clinical Professor / Assistant Dean, SOPPS Office of Student Affairs, Northeastern University

10:30 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Classroom Teaching

Transforming Complex Topics into Memorable Lessons for Your Learners

Texas 1, 2, 3

Complex ideas can be broken down into simpler parts without leaving your audience behind. In today’s digital age, visual aids can be used to enhance learner comprehension and engagement with the material. Educational visual strategies may include creation of infographics or multimedia to visually break down complex topics. This session will provide an introduction to visual tools such as infographics and videos to simplify complex topics, making learning more memorable and accessible.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the role of visual aids in facilitating pharmacy education.
  2. Develop strategies for adapting complex content into simpler learning strategies.

0581-0000-22-046-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Brooke Barlow, Pharm.D., Neuromedicine ICU Pharmacist, Memorial Hermann Woodlands Medical Center; (Speaker) Ashley Barlow, Pharm.D., Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Leukemia, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

10:30 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Experiential/Small-Group Teaching

Shining an Inclusive Light: Addressing Blind Spots

Texas 4, 5, 6

A blind spot is something about yourself and/or your actions that you don’t see clearly or are afraid to acknowledge. Since blind spots can impair decision making, it is important to understand what blind spots are, their influence on different types of biases, and learn strategies to be more self aware. This session will discuss techniques to help you identify and address your blind spots, and evaluate approaches to facilitate self-exploration and inclusive conversations.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the concepts of projection bias and false consensus effect.
  2. Discuss the Johari window and its potential for nurturing self-awareness.
  3. Address your blind spots through the creation of a self-awareness improvement plan.

0581-0000-22-040-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Lakesha M. Butler, Pharm.D., Professor, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Teachers' Seminar Lunch

 

12:15 p.m.–12:35 p.m.

Lunch Meditation PNC Moment

Grapevine D

What is a pause, notice and choose moment? “Not everything that is noticed can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is noticed.” (James Baldwin) Attendees have the opportunity to stop, on purpose in the present moment, to notice what is present (internally and externally) with curiosity. And being able to choose how we want to continue in any given moment during this mindfulness practice.

12:45 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

The Complexity of Patient Cases: Simplifying How We Approach Identities

Grapevine D

The use of patient cases is ubiquitous across pharmacy education. Many cases, if not most, utilize race, gender, and other demographic data that may often perpetuate harmful stereotypes and, consequently, implicit biases. As such, we may unintentionally create associations for our students that can hinder their ability to optimally care for our patients. This session will examine use of race and gender data as examples in pharmacy education and how these data can be appropriately utilized in the teaching and learning process.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss use of race and gender data across pharmacy education, particularly in case-based learning.
  2. Examine patient cases for appropriate use of race and gender data.
  3. Create patient case course materials that appropriately use and address race and gender data for education.

0581-0000-22-048-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Vibhuti Arya Amirfar, Pharm.D., M.P.H., FAPhA, Professor, St. John's University; (Speaker) Olihe Okoro, Ph.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor, University of Minnesota

12:45 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Experiential/Small-Group Teaching

They Said What?! Approaches to Difficult Situations in Experiential Education

Grapevine B

Students face many challenges related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in the experiential teaching environment. For example, if a patient were to make a racially insensitive comment to a learner, how would you address this as a preceptor? This scenario-based session will give attendees the opportunity to craft dialogue and practice responses in difficult situations to maintain a positive and supportive learning environment.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Reflect on the influence of diversity, equity, and inclusion on the experiential learning environment.
  2. Develop a step-by-step approach to difficult situations in experiential learning from the lens of both the clinical preceptor and the experiential office perspective.

0581-0000-22-049-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Morgan P. Stewart, Pharm.D., BCACP, BC-ADM, Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice, University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jamila J. Jorden, Pharm.D., M.B.A., Director of Experiential Program/Assistant Professor, Howard University

12:45 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Classroom Teaching

Simple Strategies to Create an Equity-minded Classroom

Texas 1, 2, 3

Students come from different backgrounds and bring unique identities and learning styles to the classroom. Giving each student an equitable chance to succeed is essential to a productive learning environment. This session will define educational equity and discuss simple, meaningful strategies to help create and foster equity in the classroom.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explore strategies for using equity to create an inclusive classroom environment.
  2. Develop a plan to implement one of the strategies.

0581-0000-22-044-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Sally A. Arif, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCP, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University

12:45 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Professional Development/Personal Wellbeing

Simple Communication Tools: How to Understand and Be Understood

Texas 4, 5, 6

This session will focus on communication styles, key characteristics of different styles, and tips for communicating with team members or leading a team, based on communication preferences. During this session, attendees will complete a communication preference self-assessment and review their preferred communication style. Attendees will then apply this knowledge to two communication focused scenarios.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize the impact of faculty incivility on productivity and work satisfaction.
  2. Identify key characteristics of different communication styles.
  3. Apply knowledge of communication styles to case scenarios with faculty-to-faculty conflict.

0581-0000-22-051-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jennifer Trujillo, Pharm.D., BCPS, FCCP, CDCES, BC-ADM, Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus; (Speaker) Sara A. Wettergreen, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

1:30 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Afternoon Networking Break

Grapevine Pre-function

1:45 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

They Said What?! Approaches to Difficult Situations in Experiential Learning

Grapevine D

Students face many challenges related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in the experiential teaching environment. For example, if a patient were to make a racially insensitive comment to a learner, how would you address this as a preceptor? This scenario-based session will give attendees the opportunity to craft dialogue and practice responses in difficult situations to maintain a positive and supportive learning environment.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Reflect on the influence of diversity, equity, and inclusion on the experiential learning environment.
  2. Develop a step-by-step approach to difficult situations in experiential learning from the lens of both the clinical preceptor and the experiential office perspective.

0581-0000-22-049-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Morgan P. Stewart, Pharm.D., BCACP, BC-ADM, Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice, University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jamila J. Jorden, Pharm.D., M.B.A., Director of Experiential Program/Assistant Professor, Howard University

1:45 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Experiential/Small-Group Teaching

The Complexity of Patient Cases: Simplifying How We Approach Identities

Grapevine B

The use of patient cases is ubiquitous across pharmacy education. Many cases, if not most, utilize race, gender, and other demographic data that may often perpetuate harmful stereotypes and, consequently, implicit biases. As such, we may unintentionally create associations for our students that can hinder their ability to optimally care for our patients. This session will examine use of race and gender data as examples in pharmacy education and how these data can be appropriately utilized in the teaching and learning process.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss use of race and gender data across pharmacy education, particularly in case-based learning.
  2. Examine patient cases for appropriate use of race and gender data.
  3. Create patient case course materials that appropriately use and address race and gender data for education.

0581-0000-22-048-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Vibhuti Arya Amirfar, Pharm.D., M.P.H., FAPhA, Professor, St. John's University; (Speaker) Olihe Okoro, Ph.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor, University of Minnesota

1:45 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Professional Development/Personal Wellbeing

Making Your Time Work for You: Optimizing Alternative Work Schedules

Texas 1, 2, 3

With a myriad of ways to work remotely and more flexibly, best practices for productivity and communication are changing. This session will discuss how to overcome the challenges of alternative work schedules and leverage technology while also addressing burnout.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss challenges encountered with alternative work schedules.
  2. Create feasible work schedule models to meet a variety of needs.

0581-0000-22-054-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jeff Cain, Ed.D., M.S., Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Adam Persky, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1:45 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Classroom Teaching

Assessment Simplified: Simpler Rubrics for Better Results

Texas 4, 5, 6

Rubrics are a scoring guide evaluating student performance using a full range of numeric criteria coupled with descriptions of performance. This tool offers benefits for students, faculty, and course assessment. This session will explore when and where to use them and best practices for creating rubrics to simplify the process of providing learner feedback.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how rubrics may inform teaching and enhance student learning.
  2. Discuss steps for rubric creation.
  3. Create a simple, effective rubric.

0581-0000-22-055-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, Ed.D., Associate Dean/Professor, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, Pharm.D., M.Ed., Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin

2:30 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Afternoon Networking Break

Grapevine Pre-function

2:45 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Large Group Debrief and Open Forum

Grapevine D

During this wrap up session, attendees will be given time to write down responses to the “now what” questions. These will be discussed in small groups and a large group discussion. To align with the day’s theme, “now what” strategies to subtract and decrease complexity will be explored.

0581-0000-22-056-L99-P, 0.75 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jennifer Trujillo, Pharm.D., BCPS, FCCP, CDCES, BC-ADM, Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Live Streaming Pass

Fee: $199

Can’t make it in-person? Join the action by purchasing a Live Streaming Pass and you’ll have access to three plenaries and 10 educational sessions delivered live. You’ll also receive recordings of live streamed sessions after the meeting.

View Live Streaming Sessions

All times listed below are in Central Daylight Time.

Sunday, July 24

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Time to Sunset Our Grading Traditions

Texas Ballroom

Grades have played an important role in the history of education but like many things, our traditional grading system needs to be reimagined. We assume that grades measure learning, motivate students to learn, are great sources of feedback and relate to clinical competence. However, this is not true and we need a better system to address our graduates’ competency. In this session, we will challenge the Academy to rethink grades as we currently use them.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the fallacies in current grading practices.
  2. Describe criteria for an optimal grading system.
  3. Hypothesize assessment models that might more accurately be used to accommodate future pharmacy education.

0581-0000-22-069-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Adam Persky, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, Ed.D., Associate Dean/Professor, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Jeff Cain, Ed.D., M.S., Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, Pharm.D., M.P.H., BCPS, Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Chief Academic Officer, University of Kentucky

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Practice Ready. Team Ready. Digital Health Ready? Preparing Students for New and Emerging Roles

Texas Ballroom

This session will introduce participants to key concepts in digital health that all students should gain exposure to, and a frictionless approach to integrate within a pharmacy curriculum. Examples from multiple institutions will be provided so the audience can tailor their approach to leverage existing resources and explore new collaborative opportunities. Faculty and school administrators with an interest in positioning their students to capitalize on digital health opportunities in pharmacy will benefit most from attendance.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of digital health in the evolving healthcare landscape, and the impact of digital health on pharmacy practice and education.
  2. Identify key competencies in digital health that all pharmacy students should achieve by graduation.
  3. Summarize strategies to develop digital health educational material that can be implemented in your institution’s curriculum.

0581-0000-22-075-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Julia Darnell, Pharm.D., BCACP, AAHIVP, Academic Pharmacy Fellow, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Lisa Goldstone, M.S., Pharm.D., BCPS, BCPP, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Kevin Clauson, Pharm.D., Professor, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Parisa Vatanka, Pharm.D., CTTS, Senior Director Corporate Alliances, American Pharmacists Association


Monday, July 25

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

For Wellness Sake, We Need Equity-Minded Faculty Workloads Right Now

Texas Ballroom

We train students to be patient-centered. We ask faculty to be student-centered. But are we faculty-centered? Leaders must protect their greatest asset, the faculty. Workload inequities, lack of clarity, and lack of transparency create environments that negatively impact the wellness of faculty. This session will share what faculty should advocate for and what administrators must do now to start the process of healing our faculty and move toward an equity-minded faculty workload.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify habits and routines within an organization that may negatively impact faculty wellness.
  2. Discuss inequities in faculty workload and its impact on the wellness of faculty.
  3. Demonstrate how the patient care process and the American Council for Education (ACE) Equity-Minded Workload Principles can provide a framework for evaluating faculty workload.

0581-0000-22-086-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Michael J. Fulford, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Institutional Effectiveness and Strategic Initiatives, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, Pharm.D., BCPS, Professor and Vice Chair, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Lisa M. Meny, Pharm.D., Professor, Accreditation and Assessment Coordinator, Ferris State University

2:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

CAPE Outcomes and EPA Revisions: Academic Affairs Committee Report

Texas Ballroom

The 2021–22 AACP Academic Affairs Committee will describe and discuss revisions to the CAPE outcomes and EPAs. Their work has been based on feedback from the Academy and other stakeholders. Also, ideas related to the implementation of the CAPE outcomes and EPAs across the Academy will be sought and shared.

(Moderator) Kelly Ragucci, Pharm.D., Vice President of Professional Development, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, Ed.D., Associate Dean/Professor, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Scott Stolte, Pharm.D., Dean, Nesbitt School of Pharmacy, Wilkes University

2:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

A Positive Side to the Pandemic: Collaborating With Partners to Pivot to Virtual IPE Experiences

Grapevine B

Delivering meaningful interprofessional education opportunities was challenging for pharmacy schools even before the global pandemic; COVID-19 only added obstacles to this goal. In this session participants will learn from University of Illinois Chicago’s (UIC) experience pivoting a local, in-person, third year (P3) IPE program to a state-wide initiative. Collaboration with multiple university campuses and other institutions in Illinois allowed students to learn about, from, and with more professions including students from rural and urban campuses.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the IPEC core competencies and how interprofessional education (IPE) fits into ACPE accreditation standards.
  2. Discuss lessons learned from a peer institution on pivoting from in person to virtual IPE experiences for their pharmacy students.

0581-0000-22-114-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Kevin O. Rynn, Pharm.D., FCCP, DABAT, Clinical Professor and Vice Dean, University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Marianne Pop, Pharm.D, M.P.H., BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) College of Pharmacy

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

How Might We Adapt? Supporting Faculty and Leadership Problem-Solving in Times of Uncertainty

Texas Ballroom

Feeling overwhelmed with problem-solving and decision-making in uncertain or turbulent times? Are you searching for a framework to help you or your leadership team generate innovative educational solutions with unexpected constraints? We invite you to this session about the design thinking approach, a process that can promote creative problem-solving. In this session, participants will learn how to use design thinking to develop inventive solutions for challenges such as curriculum design and supporting faculty and learners.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss barriers to problem-solving and decision-making strategies during uncertain or turbulent times.
  2. Describe the design thinking process and techniques to promote creative problem-solving.
  3. Apply the design thinking process to generate solutions to identified challenges.

0581-0000-22-126-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Curriculum Innovation and Assessment, High Point University School of Dental Medicine; (Speaker) Amy M. Pick, Pharm.D., M.S., BCOP, Assistant Dean for Experiential Education, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Tuesday, July 26

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

No Woman Left Behind: Negotiating the Next Step in Your Career

Texas Ballroom

Am I doing enough to be promoted? Is my workload and compensation fair? How will an interruption affect my tenure bid? Do I have what it takes to be a leader? These questions and others are common for women faculty to ask themselves during their career. This session will highlight gender bias in the workplace, promotion/tenure concerns common to women faculty, and wage gap inequalities. Strategies to close these equality gaps will also be discussed.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain gender biases in the workplace and leadership roles through the lens of the “category expectancy violation theory” and formulate strategies to address this bias.
  2. Discuss the impact of medical leave, maternity leave, childcare, and flexible work schedules may have on the promotion and tenure of female faculty and develop strategies for overcoming these barriers.
  3. Identify disparities in salaries earned by women compared to their male counterparts in academia and the pharmacy profession and discuss strategies to address this wage gap.

0581-0000-22-134-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Moderator) Susan E. Smith, Pharm.D., BCCCP, BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Rebecca Sleeper, Pharm.D., FASCP, BCPS, Senior Associate Dean of Curricular Affairs, Assessment and Accreditation, and Professor, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Jerry H. Hodge School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Laura M. Borgelt, Pharm.D., M.B.A., Associate Vice Chancellor of Strategic Initiatives and Professor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus; (Speaker) Sarah Nisly, Pharm.D., M.Ed., BCPS, FCCP, Vice President, Outcomes and Clinical Impact, Wingate University

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Global Partnerships for Change—Foundational and Clinical Science Integration for Pharmacists’ Professional Identity Formation

Texas Ballroom

COVID-19 has surfaced global inequities in healthcare education. Pharmacies can serve as economic and healthcare growth engines but remain underutilized due to limitations to a fuller scope of practice. We will share our approach, assessment strategies, successes, and lessons learned in training faculty across international programs in Japan, India, Egypt, and Bangladesh and form strategies to integrate foundational and clinical sciences to effectuate meaningful change in pharmacy practice in these countries.

(Moderator & Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, Pharm.BS, M.S., Ph.D., FAPE, Assistant Dean for Accreditation and Program Development; Director, Institute of Teaching & Learning, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Mikiko Takeda, Pharm.D., M.S., PhC, Associate Professor, The University of New Mexico; (Speaker) Islam N. Mohamed, B.Pharm, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, California Northstate University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) David Fuentes, Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, Ed.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, University of Portland

11:00 a.m.–Noon

AACP Transformation Center: Connecting, Scaling, and Accelerating

Texas Ballroom

The AACP Transformation Center (ATC) team will provide insight into why the ATC was created, what they plan to accomplish, and the approach they are taking to do so. Examples of innovation and transformation that are already being tapped into will be highlighted, and key takeaways from the Bridging Pharmacy Education and Practice Summit will be discussed. Attendees will have the opportunity to share ideas about the ATC's future plans.

(Speaker) Melissa Murer Corrigan, R.Ph., CAE, FAPhA, FASHP, Executive Director, AACP Transformation Center, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Nidhi Gandhi, Pharm.D., B.S., Associate Director of Research Programs and Special Initiatives, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Miranda Steinkopf, Pharm.D., Academic Leadership and Education Fellow, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Pharmacogenomics Case-based Education: One Size Does Not Fit All. Incorporating Diversity-and-Inclusion Principles in Case Development

Texas Ballroom

This session presents two approaches that incorporates diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) principles in pharmacogenomics education: [1] Diverse standardized pharmacogenomics patient cases repository created by the Pharmacogenomics SIG and rationale for population specific genetic markers in case development. [2] A descriptive overview, including a brief simulated demonstration of a classroom debate using a “thinking-hat approach” to help students reflect on challenges such as race as a social construct versus a biological one within Personalized Medicine.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the rationale for updating and evaluating the case repository to better reflect biogeographic diversity and inclusion of populations within identified therapeutic areas.
  2. Identify three therapeutic areas within pharmacogenomics for future case updates that consider diversity and inclusion principles.
  3. Describe how standardized patient cases and the use of classroom debates, using the thinking-hat approach, can address diversity, equity and inclusion in pharmacogenomics

0581-0000-22-156-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Chair & Moderator) Otito F. Iwuchukwu, RPh, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Fairleigh Dickinson University; (Speaker) Marina Galvez Peralta, Pharm.D., Ph.D., FCP, Teaching Associate Professor and Director of the Division of Teaching, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Diane Calinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Vice Chair of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manchester University; (Speaker) Cheryl D. Cropp, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Samford University; (Speaker) Rustin D. Crutchley, Pharm.D., AAHIVP, Associate Professor, Washington State University

 

Programming

All Programming is Subject to Change.
All times listed below are in Central Daylight Time.


Friday, July 22

4:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Center Pre-function

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2022. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions and assist with the AACP meeting app.


Saturday, July 23

7:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Center Pre-function

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2022. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions and assist with the AACP meeting app.

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE) Editorial Team Meeting

TBD

By Invitation Only

(Moderator & Speaker) Gayle Brazeau, Ph.D., Professor, Marshall University

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Junior Faculty and First Timers Annual Meeting Orientation and Networking Session

Grapevine B

Attendees are invited to this session to share, learn and network with colleagues about the wonderful opportunities available through the AACP Annual Meeting and AACP membership.

(Moderator) Terry Ryan, M.F.A., Senior Director of Enterprise Systems and Membership , American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Matt Cipriani, M.L.I.S., Director of Member Engagement, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Stuart T. Haines, Pharm.D., FCCP, FASHP, FAPhA, Director of the Division of Pharmacy Professional Development, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Kyle J. Schmidt, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Dorothy Farrell, Ph.D., Senior Director of Science Policy/Chief Science Officer, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Nidhi Gandhi, Pharm.D., B.S., Associate Director of Research Programs and Special Initiatives, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Deans (COD) Administrative Board Meeting

Closed meeting.

San Antonio 1, 2, 3

This is a closed meeting of the 2021–2022 Council of Deans Administrative Board members and the incoming COD Administrative Board members.

(Chair) Renae Chesnut, Ed.D., M.B.A., B.S., Dean and Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Drake College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

3:45 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Faculties Administrative Board Meeting

Closed meeting.

Ft. Worth 5, 6, 7

Closed business meeting of the elected leaders of the Council of Faculties.

(Chair) Jennifer Trujillo, Pharm.D., BCPS, FCCP, CDCES, BC-ADM, Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

3:45 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Sections (COS) Meeting

Closed meeting.

Austin 5, 6, 7

Closed meeting of the Council of Sections (COS), consisting of the COS Administrative Board and individual Section officers.

(Moderator & Speaker) Terri Smith Moore, Ph.D., M.B.A., R.Ph., CPH, Senior Director of Academic Services and Strategic Initiatives, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Moderator & Speaker) Pamela C. Heaton, Ph.D., Chair, COS Administrative Board, University of Cincinnati; (Speaker) Lakesha M. Butler, Pharm.D., Chair-elect, COS Administrative Board, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Bernadette Brown, Pharm.D., Immediate Past Chair, COS Administrative Board, Butler University; (Speaker) Ana C. Quiñones-Boex, Ph.D., FAPhA, Secretary of Knowledge Management, COS Administrative Board, Midwestern University College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove Campus (CPDG)

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Student Mock Trial Competition—CPD Section

This will be a mock trial (student competition), with the final two teams competing. The CPD Section coordinated previous early round competitions virtually and narrowed it down to these final two student teams.

(Moderator & Speaker) Hoai-An Truong, Pharm.D., M.P.H., FAPhA, FNAP, Professor, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

5:00 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Meeting of the Project Team for FDA Grant, “Utilizing the Pharmacy Advances Clinical Trials (PACT) Network to Achieve Diversity in COVID Clinical Trials: A Strategic Framework”

Ft. Worth 5, 6, 7

By Invitation Only

7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

ALFP Commencement

TBD

By Invitation Only

Dinner and graduation ceremony for ALFP Cohort 18.


Sunday, July 24

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Center Pre-function

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Center Pre-function

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2022. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions and assist with the AACP meeting app.

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

First House of Delegates Session Sign-in

Texas Ballroom Pre-function

All delegates are required to sign in on Sunday and Wednesday so the Credentials Committee can determine the quorum for business.

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Opening General Session: Harnessing the Power of Uniqueness and Belonging

Texas Ballroom

Most of us want to be inclusive but just don’t know what steps to take to get there. Johnson will explain what it takes to make people feel included by digging into our two most basic human needs: to be unique and to belong. She will also explain why this is so important amidst COVID-19 and some of the unique challenges and opportunities that COVID-19 has created for inclusion and belonging. Finally, the presentation will cover strategies that individual people can take to act more inclusively.

(Speaker) Stefanie Johnson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Organizational, Leadership, and Information Analytics, Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado- Boulder

9:45 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Book Signing with Keynote Speaker

Texas Pre-function

Meet keynote speaker, professor and author, Stefanie K. Johnson, Ph.D., as she signs copies of her book Inclusify following the Opening General Session. Dr. Johnson studies the intersection of leadership and diversity, focusing on (1) how unconscious bias affects the evaluation of leaders and (2) strategies that leaders can use to mitigate bias. She has published more than 70 journal articles and book chapters in outlets such as Harvard Business Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, and The Academy of Management Journal. She currently contributes to Bloomberg, Forbes, and Harvard Business Review. 

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Application of Pharmaceutics/Pharmacokinetic Concepts in Community Pharmacy

Grapevine B

Students often fail to see the relevance of Pharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics to Community Pharmacy Practice. We have designed a series of community pharmacy case studies that emphasizes the utilization of this material in patient counseling and answering questions from other health care professionals which is utilized in an essentials of pharmacy practice course. Target audience is members of the pharmaceutics section, laboratory instructors and clinical faculty.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the application of pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetic concepts in community pharmacy practice.
  2. List the most important pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetic concepts for pharmacists in a community practice setting.

0581-0000-22-057-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Catherine A. White, Ph.D., Associate Professor, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Robin L. Southwood, B.S., Pharm.D., CDE, BC-ADM, Clinical Associate Professor

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Ask the Experts: Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Traditional college courses are typically taught in a monodisciplinary fashion. Even in team-taught courses, which are increasingly common in pharmacy curricula, students encounter professors from the same discipline. In contrast, interdisciplinary education draws on multiple disciplines to acquire a deep understanding of complex issues. This session will review an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and describe an innovative online course developed to teach students about the far reaching implications of a pandemic.

(Speaker) Brittany Bates, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Ohio Northern University; (Speaker) Katie L. Jarrell, Pharm.D., BCCCP, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Ohio Northern University

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Multilevel Integration in Pharmacy Curriculum: Common Challenges and Effective Solutions

Austin 5, 6, 7

This session will examine curricular integration from multiple viewpoints, focusing on common challenges and solutions. Topics covered will range from boots on the ground issues like working with faculty members from another discipline to whole program topics like integrating didactic content with experiential content and assessing integrated content. Participants will engage in active learning to anticipate challenges in curricular integration and work to create solutions that will work for them at their institutions.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Design three distinct pedagogical approaches to integrate pharmaceutical and biological sciences with clinical sciences including IPPE and Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process (PPCP).
  2. Create formative and summative assessments to reinforce the integration and to assure mastery of different disciplines by students.
  3. Connect the integrated concepts from pharmaceutical and clinical sciences into the PPCP process and IPPE experiences.

0581-0000-22-058-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Dan Berlau, Ph.D., Professor, School of Pharmacy, Regis University; (Speaker) Marina Galvez Peralta, Pharm.D., Ph.D., FCP, Teaching Associate Professor and Director of the Division of Teaching, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Vanishree Rajagopalan, M.Pharm, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Touro University California College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Terri Wong, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice Center Coordinator, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Touro University California College of Pharmacy

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Patient, Carer and Public Involvement in Curriculum Design, Teaching and Assessment: Using the INVOLVE Model

Grapevine C

To enhance student learning, and to develop patient/person-centered practitioners, many healthcare professions have identified the importance of patient/public involvement in professional programs. This workshop will describe the approach taken in three institutions to support patient, carer (someone who provides support for a patient) and public involvement in curriculum design/development, teaching and assessment. The workshop will be of interest to pharmacy educators developing and delivering patient/person-centered learning in academic or practice settings.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the INVOLVE model and how it can be used to support patient, carer and public engagement in student learning.
  2. Describe the approaches with examples to support patient, carer and public involvement in curriculum design/development, teaching and assessment by universities in three countries.
  3. Discuss a strategy to recruit and engage patients, carers and members of the public in curriculum design, teaching and assessment of pharmacy students and pharmacists.

0581-0000-22-059-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Vivienne Mak, Ph.D., Director, Health & Clinical Programs, Keypath Education; (Speaker) Tasha Woodall, Pharm.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Education, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Louise A. Brown, BSc (Hons) MRPharmS PGDip in Clinical Pharmacy, PGDip in Clinical Education, Professor in Pharmacy Education, University College London School of Pharmacy

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 1

Texas 1, 2, 3

The list of roundtable topics and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app.

(Moderator) Bernadette Brown, Pharm.D., Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University COPHS

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

First House of Delegates Session

Texas Ballroom

All Annual Meeting attendees are welcome to come and hear reports from AACP leaders and guests, including incoming President Russ Melchert’s remarks. Candidates for the office of President-elect will be introduced during the session and an initial report on the business before the House will be provided by the Bylaws & Policy Development Committee.

(Moderator) Gloria Grice, Pharm.D., FNAP, BCPS, Speaker of the House, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis

10:45 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Don’t Reinvent the Wheel! How to Teach Digital Health Using Existing Clinical Patient Cases

Grapevine B

Attendees of this session will be exposed to methodologies that allow for incorporation of digital health topics into small group clinical patient care cases. Session participants are encouraged to bring a current or draft clinical case that is used at their institution. Participants will be provided with examples, and provided time to work with other participants to integrate a digital health topic into an existing case.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the benefit of teaching digital health to student pharmacists in an active and engaging manner.
  2. Describe strategies to incorporate digital health elements into small group clinical discussion cases.

0581-0000-22-061-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Julia Darnell, Pharm.D., BCACP, AAHIVP, Academic Pharmacy Fellow, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Lisa Goldstone, M.S., Pharm.D., BCPS, BCPP, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Southern California

10:45 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Walking the Tightrope: Balancing Administrative and Faculty Roles as Junior or Mid-Level Leaders

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Junior and mid-level leaders (e.g., directors, vice-chairs) are challenged to balance teaching, service, and scholarship with a small administrative appointment. Mid-level leaders must excel at communication between faculty and administrators, affecting change within their limited scope, and prioritizing competing tasks, all while pursuing promotion and/or tenure. In this session we review leadership and prioritization strategies for mid-level and up-and-coming leaders and provide resources for success.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe common and significant challenges encountered in first-time or new academic leadership roles, and their potential consequences.
  2. Identify strategies and techniques for success and balance in assuming mid-level leadership roles on top of teaching, service, and research responsibilities.

0581-0000-22-062-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Meredith L. Howard, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor and Chair, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Caitlin M. Gibson, Pharm.D, M.Ed., Associate Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University

11:30 a.m.–Noon

So You Think You Can Podcast? Getting Started with Podcasting in Pharmacy Education

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Podcasts are becoming an increasingly popular way to create, deliver, and consume content and information. As such, they may be valuable as an asynchronous teaching method. This session explores opportunities for podcasting in pharmacy education in both the didactic and experiential settings and beyond. Furthermore, it will introduce how to get started in podcasting including equipment, production and dissemination so that audience members with no background will know where to start if they are interested.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Outline a podcast “show” idea and plan on how to use in the didactic or experiential setting.
  2. Identify equipment, software and tools necessary to produce a high quality podcast.

0581-0000-22-063-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Taylor D. Steuber, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Sean Smithgall, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Clinical Professor, Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy

11:30 a.m.–Noon

Up Your OSCE Game: Setting Standards for High-Stakes Objective Structured Clinical Examinations

Grapevine B

Selection of appropriate standard setting methods is a critical factor in determining pass scores for objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). This session will provide an overview of various methods of absolute standard setting for OSCEs. Speakers will share University of Florida’s experience with the transformation of high-stakes OSCEs from relative to absolute standards. Participants will learn key elements in the process of establishing, implementing and validating standard setting using absolute methods.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast various methods of absolute standard setting for determination of OSCE passing scores.
  2. Describe the process of establishing, implementing and validating absolute standard setting for a high-stakes OSCE.

0581-0000-22-064-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) James Taylor, Pharm.D., BCACP, Director & Clinical Professor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Karen Whalen, Pharm.D., BCPS, FAPhA, Assistant Dean and Clinical Professor, University of Florida

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Alohomora! Unlocking Longitudinal Theme-based Activities to Increase Student Engagement

Grapevine C

Could longitudinal thematic gaming increase student engagement? Get transported into this exciting Harry Potter world of four institutions who independently incorporated Harry Potter into their pharmacy courses. When you arrive, you’ll be sorted into your Harry Potter ‘drug’ house and gather house points throughout the session while learning how to implement and assess longitudinal thematic gaming into your courses. You will also get hands-on experience with various games instituted at the four institutions.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. List three benefits to incorporating longitudinal thematic gaming into pharmacy courses.
  2. Explain how to assess students’ engagement in theme-based activities.
  3. Outline how to incorporate thematic gaming into participant’s own pharmacy course.

0581-0000-22-065-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Deanna Tran, Pharm.D., BCACP, Associate Professor, Co-Director of Pharmacy Practice Laboratories, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Krista L. Donohoe, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP, Associate Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Rebekah Benitez, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Cheryl Horlen, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Dean and Chair of Pharmacy Practice, University of the Incarnate Word Feik School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Martha Garcia-Stout, Pharm.D., J.D., Lecturer, University of Central Florida, College of Health Professions and Sciences

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Curriculum & Experiential Learning Frameworks and Tools for Transformation from the ACT Pharmacy Collaborative

Grapevine A

The Academia-CPESN Transformation (ACT) Pharmacy Collaborative will provide an update and guidance on various tools created for pharmacy faculty members and deans to assist with bringing community pharmacy practice transformation to pharmacy students. The curricular and experiential education frameworks and the ACT 50 Stories from 50 States multimedia library will be highlighted. Guidance on using and implementing these tools will be shared, and active dialogue will occur between attendees and presenters.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Utilize the curriculum and experiential frameworks created by the ACT Pharmacy Collaborative.
  2. Employ the ACT 50 Stories from 50 States multimedia library.
  3. Apply information you learned about the frameworks and the multimedia library to determine how you could incorporate these tools into your curriculum to advance community pharmacy practice transformation.

0581-0000-22-066-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Melissa McGivney, Pharm.D., Associate Dean for Community Partnerships, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Sophia Herbert, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmacy and Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Christopher Daly, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Nicholas Leon, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, Thomas Jefferson College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Megan Smith, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Rachel A. Allen, Pharm.D., BCACP, Clinical Assistant Professor, Director, Bracken Pharmacy Learning Center, University of Washington; (Speaker) Shelby Bennett, Pharm.D., BCACP, Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Speaker) Miranda Steinkopf, Pharm.D., BCACP, Academic Leadership and Education Fellow

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Develop Your Blueprint for EPA-Based Experiential Assessment: Lessons Learned from the Southeastern Region

Dallas 5, 6, 7

This interactive session will assist attendees with development of a blueprint for addressing four difficult, but critical, decision points faced by institutions planning to implement EPA-based APPE evaluations. These four key decision points include: approach to implementation, assessing professionalism, measuring performance (grading scales/rubrics), and evaluating non-patient care rotations. Presenters will describe the pros and cons of the varying approaches to these four key decision-points utilized by eight schools of pharmacy, spanning across three southeastern states.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify at least four key decision points to expect when implementing EPA-based experiential assessments.
  2. Explain pros and cons of varying approaches to the four key decision points encountered by southeastern region institutions.
  3. Design a blueprint plan to prepare for EPA-based assessment implementation in experiential settings.

0581-0000-22-067-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Lindsey H. Welch, Pharm.D., BCPS, Senior Public Service Associate and Director, Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Whitney D. Maxwell, Pharm.D., M.B.A., BCPS, Associate Director of Experiential Education, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jennifer Baker, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, Director of Experiential Education, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Lynn Stevenson, Pharm.D., BCPS, Executive Director of Experiential Programs/Associate Clinical Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Auburn University; (Speaker) Elizabeth D. Weed, M.S.W., Pharm.D., BCPP, Assistant Professor, Director of Experiential Education, Medical University of South Carolina, College of Pharmacy

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grant Microsessions

Texas 4, 5, 6

Recipients of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grants share 10-minute summaries of their SOTL projects.

(Moderator) Ellen Woods, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Engaging Student Pharmacists in Social Determinants of Health through Photovoice
(Speaker) Sharon Connor, University of Pittsburgh
Comparison of Students’ Performance Using Online vs. Face-to-Face Team-Based Learning
(Speaker) Osama Shoair, The University of Texas at Tyler
Use of Journey Mapping and Design Think Practices to Assess Professional Development
(Speaker) Amy Pick, University of Nebraska Medical Center

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Walking the Tightrope: Assessing Efficiency and Effectiveness of Skills-based Assessments

Grapevine D

To matriculate competent pharmacy graduates, methods of assessment should not only be effective but efficient. It can be argued that one without the other is neither worthwhile nor sustainable. The goal of this session is to discuss various skills assessments given at four institutions where both efficiency and effectiveness have been explored. Participants will leave this session with strategies they can incorporate in practice to help improve the efficiency and/or effectiveness of learner assessments.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of effective and efficient learner assessments.
  2. Discuss strategies and provide examples to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of learner assessments in the skills lab setting.
  3. Develop a plan to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of learner assessments at your own institution.

0581-0000-22-068-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Julie Cooper, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCP, Associate Professor of Clinical Sciences, High Point University; (Speaker) Tara Storjohann, Pharm.D., BCGP, FASCP, Professor of Pharmacy Practice at Midwestern University-Glendale Campus, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Courtney L. Bradley, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences, Director of Clinical Skills Laboratory, High Point University; (Speaker) Heidi Anksorus, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jeanne E. Frenzel, Pharm.D., Ph.D., BCSCP, Professor, North Dakota State University

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Teacher of the Year Luncheon

San Antonio 4, 5, 6

By Invitation Only

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Women Faculty SIG: Luncheon and Business Meeting

Texas 1, 2, 3

The 2022 Women Faculty SIG business luncheon programming will include a facilitated discussion of the book club “Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter” by Liz Wiseman and Greg McKeown. Dr. Sharon Park will share her reflections in an interactive discussion of how the content relates to women faculty in the academy. Additionally, each committee will report on their first year of implementation of our Strategic Plan.

(Speaker) Sara N. Trovinger, Pharm.D., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Director of Distance Pathway, Manchester University; (Speaker) Susan E. Smith, Pharm.D., BCCCP, BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Sharon K. Park, Pharm.D., M.Ed., BCPS, Associate Professor and Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs, Notre Dame of Maryland University School of Pharmacy

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

PCAT Advisory Committee

Closed Meeting.

Ft. Worth 5, 6, 7

(Chair) Lisa Lebovitz, J.D., M.S., Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs and Assessment, University of Maryland

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Pharm4Me Champions Advisory Committee

Closed Meeting.

Austin 4, 5, 6

(Chair) Heidi Fuchs, Assistant Dean for Admissions and Enrollment Management, Touro College

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Time to Sunset Our Grading Traditions

Texas Ballroom

Grades have played an important role in the history of education but like many things, our traditional grading system needs to be reimagined. We assume that grades measure learning, motivate students to learn, are great sources of feedback and relate to clinical competence. However, this is not true and we need a better system to address our graduates’ competency. In this session, we will challenge the Academy to rethink grades as we currently use them.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the fallacies in current grading practices.
  2. Describe criteria for an optimal grading system.
  3. Hypothesize assessment models that might more accurately be used to accommodate future pharmacy education.

0581-0000-22-069-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Adam Persky, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, Ed.D., Associate Dean/Professor, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Jeff Cain, Ed.D., M.S., Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, Pharm.D., M.P.H., BCPS, Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Chief Academic Officer, University of Kentucky

12:15 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

A Slam Dunk: Engaging Students in the Classroom Through a March Medication Madness Activity

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Immerse yourself into the student experience by participating in a bracketology activity of knowledge and competition. This session will illustrate the implementation of “March Medication Madness,” an interactive, bracketology activity into the curriculum. During March Medication Madness, clinical pearls are used in lieu of basketball teams to increase student knowledge and engagement in learning. Anyone who is interested in the incorporation of novel, student engagement activities, is encouraged to attend.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how an interactive bracketology activity can be implemented into the classroom to engage student learning.
  2. Discuss lessons learned and strategies to overcome barriers when implementing bracketology.

0581-0000-22-070-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Allison Hursman, Pharm.D., BCGP, Assistant Professor of Practice, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Elizabeth Monson, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, North Dakota State University

12:15 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

A Telehealth APPE Rotation Where Students Adjust Medications in Real Time With a Physician

Grapevine B

This mini-session will provide a description of a Telehealth APPE rotation where students adjust medications for ambulatory care patients in real-time in coordination with a physician. It will also discuss how this activity maps to the EPAs.

(Speaker) Richard F. O'Brocta, Pharm.D., Director of Experiential Education, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Greg Alston, Pharm.D., CEO of RXVIP Concierge, Preceptor

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Building Financially Sustainable Academic Community Partnerships to Advance Access: A Case Study in Appalachia

Grapevine B

Building sustainable academic-community partnerships while increasing patient access to pharmacist care can be challenging, especially when facing an urban-rural divide. This session will describe the creation of a new partnership through a shared faculty position with an urban, land grant university and an independent pharmacy in rural Appalachia Ohio. Presenters will share strategies to initiate novel urban-rural partnerships and guide community-engaged faculty and administrators through identifying the needs of stakeholders to establish mutually beneficial partnerships.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss strategies for engaging community partners who might mutually benefit from a shared faculty position.
  2. Describe the challenges and opportunities to urban-rural academic partnership.

0581-0000-22-071-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Rebecca M. Lahrman, Pharm.D., M.S., BCACP, Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Rodis, Pharm.D., BCPS, FAPhA, Professor of Clinical Pharmacy; Associate Dean for Outreach and Engagement, The Ohio State University

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Academic Success and Achievement Planning (A.S.A.P): A Preventative Approach to Academic Success

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Early intervention is a vital component of academic improvement and progression among pharmacy students. This session introduces a novel approach to an early intervention program using a method known as A.S.A.P. (Academic Success and Achievement Planning). The steps included in this method intentionally mirror those of the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process and focus on a student-centered approach to academic success.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the A.S.A.P. model and its utility as an approach for early intervention and academic improvement among at-risk pharmacy students.
  2. Outline the steps for developing an individualized, student-centered plan for academic improvement using the A.S.A.P. model and the Compact as a tool for continued accountability.

0581-0000-22-072-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Ashley S. Crumby, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Academic Affairs Coordinator & Instructional Assistant Professor, The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Kristopher Harrell, Pharm.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, The University of Mississippi

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Building Financially Sustainable Academic Community Partnerships to Advance Access: A Case Study in Appalachia

Grapevine B

Building sustainable academic-community partnerships while increasing patient access to pharmacist care can be challenging, especially when facing an urban-rural divide. This session will describe the creation of a new partnership through a shared faculty position with an urban, land grant university and an independent pharmacy in rural Appalachia Ohio. Presenters will share strategies to initiate novel urban-rural partnerships and guide community-engaged faculty and administrators through identifying the needs of stakeholders to establish mutually beneficial partnerships.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss strategies for engaging community partners who might mutually benefit from a shared faculty position.
  2. Describe the challenges and opportunities to urban-rural academic partnership.

0581-0000-22-071-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Rebecca M. Lahrman, Pharm.D., M.S., BCACP, Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Rodis, Pharm.D., BCPS, FAPhA, Professor of Clinical Pharmacy; Associate Dean for Outreach and Engagement, The Ohio State University

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

A Continuing Professional Development Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience to Develop Practice-Ready Graduates: Three Institutions’ Experiences

Dallas 5, 6, 7

Several elements of ACPE Standards 2016 highlight the importance of Continuing Professional Development in pharmacy curricula, including Standards 4.1 (Self-awareness), 6d (Commitment to CPD), and 10 (Promotion of self-directed, life-long learning). This session presents a novel CPD APPE rotation implemented across three institutions that provided students opportunity to apply CPD in their own professional development. This CPD APPE may serve as a scalable model for other programs to consider for implementation at their own institutions.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the CPD process and its elements.
  2. Predict the benefits of a pharmacy practice experience devoted to students’ immersion in CPD.
  3. Illustrate how their institution can intentionally promote CPD for Pharm.D. students.

0581-0000-22-073-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator) Stephen A. Brown, J.D., Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, McWhorter School of Pharmacy, Samford University; (Speaker) Kelsey Frederick, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Janet Cooley, Pharm.D., BCACP, Associate Professor and Director of Experiential Education, The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Suzanne Larson, Pharm.D., Director of Experiential Education, Midwestern University/Glendale College of Pharmacy

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Pass the Mic: Empowering Patients as Teachers of Diversity, Equity, and Cultural Sensitivity

Austin 5, 6, 7

The call for impactful diversity, equity, and cultural sensitivity training is urgent and paramount. Patients are prime albeit underutilized resources for teaching the complexities of navigating the healthcare system as they are experts by experience. Teaching can provide personal fulfillment to patient educators and promote long-term mutually beneficial relationships between colleges and patient groups. This session describes experiences empowering patients to teach cultural sensitivity at two institutions and discuss best practices for implementing similar partnerships.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the rationale and key considerations for incorporating patients as teachers of diversity, equity, and cultural sensitivity topics.
  2. Identify where patients can be utilized as teachers within the curriculum.
  3. Develop a patient recruitment and training plan that cultivates a mutually beneficial partnership and centers respect, dignity, confidentiality, and autonomy for patient educators.

0581-0000-22-074-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Caitlin M. Gibson, Pharm.D., M.Ed., Associate Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Sarah Gordon, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Manchester University; (Speaker) Nancy Borja-Hart, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Jennifer Santee, Pharm.D., Clinical Associate Professor, University of Missouri-Kansas City

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Practice Ready. Team Ready. Digital Health Ready? Preparing Students for New and Emerging Roles

Texas Ballroom

This session will introduce participants to key concepts in digital health that all students should gain exposure to, and a frictionless approach to integrate within a pharmacy curriculum. Examples from multiple institutions will be provided so the audience can tailor their approach to leverage existing resources and explore new collaborative opportunities. Faculty and school administrators with an interest in positioning their students to capitalize on digital health opportunities in pharmacy will benefit most from attendance.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of digital health in the evolving healthcare landscape, and the impact of digital health on pharmacy practice and education.
  2. Identify key competencies in digital health that all pharmacy students should achieve by graduation.
  3. Summarize strategies to develop digital health educational material that can be implemented in your institution’s curriculum.

0581-0000-22-075-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Julia Darnell, Pharm.D., BCACP, AAHIVP, Academic Pharmacy Fellow, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Lisa Goldstone, M.S., Pharm.D., BCPS, BCPP, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Kevin Clauson, Pharm.D., Professor, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Parisa Vatanka, Pharm.D., CTTS, Senior Director Corporate Alliances, American Pharmacists Association

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Too Much, Too Fast—Using Cognitive Load Theory to Inform Teaching and Learning

Grapevine D

In this session, attendees will learn the principles of cognitive load theory (CLT) and how it influences student learning. The session will provide an overview of the various forms of cognitive load (e.g., extraneous, intrinsic, and germane) and examples of instructional approaches that reduce counterproductive forms of cognitive load (e.g., extraneous) in order to increase germane learning. Attendees will use principles of CLT and suggested instructional approaches to optimize cognitive load in example scenarios.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the three types of cognitive load (intrinsic, extraneous, and germane) and their implication on learning.
  2. Compare and contrast instructional strategies that can be used to decrease extraneous workload, increase intrinsic load, and optimize germane load.
  3. When given an educational scenario, propose alternative instructional approaches to optimize student learning using principles from the cognitive load theory.

0581-0000-22-076-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Zachary R. Noel, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Adam Persky, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Walking the Walk: Cultivating a Culture of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Throughout Your Institution

Grapevine C

Cultivating an internal culture dedicated to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) is essential to ensuring student pharmacists are prepared to deliver care to the diverse patients they will serve. Institutional commitment to DEI requires thoughtful reflection and integration of key concepts across all aspects of core mission areas. Speakers will provide practical information on how DEI has been incorporated across multiple dimensions at their institutions, including student admissions, faculty/staff workforce, curriculum, and college climate.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of DEI to prepare student pharmacists to care for diverse patient populations.
  2. Discuss examples of how DEI can be embedded within multiple activities at schools of pharmacy.
  3. Formulate a plan to implement at least one new DEI initiative at your home institution.

0581-0000-22-077-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) John Allen, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP, FCCM, FCCP, Associate Dean and Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Karen Whalen, Pharm.D., BCPS, FAPhA, Assistant Dean and Clinical Professor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Lakesha M. Butler, Pharm.D., Professor, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Hope Campbell, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, Belmont University

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

ARM Yourself for NIA Success: Understanding the Applicant-Reviewer-Mentor (ARM) Triad

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Early-career track faculty from non-R1/R2, Pharm.D.-only granting institutions have greater resource constraints (e.g., funds, space, equipment, research personnel) in advancing their research projects, compared to their R1/R2 counterparts. Two seasoned faculty (also former Chairs of the Chemistry Section) and a recent NIA awardee share their perspectives and ideas to provide potential AACP NIA applicants a blueprint, and to guide the construction of competitive proposals within the scope of their institution’s research resources.

(Chair & Moderator) Anand Sridhar, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, MCPHS University – Boston; (Speaker) Andrew Coop, Ph.D., Associate Dean & Professor, University of Maryland; (Speaker) John Rimoldi, Ph.D., Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology in BioMolecular Sciences, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Margaret Olson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, Roosevelt University

2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Navigating the “Wild Wild Web” of Professionalism and Social Media

Ft. Worth 5, 6, 7

The session will use an interactive, case-based approach to discuss issues related to professionalism and social media use among faculty, staff, and learners. The Professionalism and Social Media Task Force will facilitate the dialog and share insights. The discussion will include ways for schools to minimize risk, protect privacy, and respect free speech. Participants will consider the potential consequences of perceived unprofessional behavior, approaches to managing breaches, and suggestions for creating policy or guidance documents.

(Speaker & Moderator) Cathy L. Worrall, B.S.N., Pharm.D., BCPS, FAPhA, Associate Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs and Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Sara A. Wettergreen, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus; (Speaker) Jeff Cain, Ed.D., M.S., Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Jonathan Thigpen, Pharm.D., Assistant Dean for Curricular Innovation and Professional Development, Samford University; (Speaker) Michelle Seegert, Pharm.D., BCACP, BCADM, Clinical Associate Professor, Director of Introductory Experiential Education, University of Toledo; (Speaker) Zachary Noel, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Maryland

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Section Networking Sessions

The nine (9) Sections of the Council of Sections will hold individual networking sessions for their Section members.

2:15 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Bringing the 4-day Workweek to Pharmacy Education

Grapevine B

Inspired by the 4-day workweek’s demonstrated benefits for employee’s productivity and work-life balance, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy implemented a 4-day course schedule for all student cohorts beginning in Spring of 2021, without a loss of instruction time. The target audience for this session are faculty and administrators who are interested in a strategy to provide opportunities for students to prioritize their well-being while maintaining engagement inside and outside of the classroom.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. List the benefits of a 4-day workweek for pharmacy students and faculty.
  2. Describe the lessons learned when implementing a 4-day course schedule.

0581-0000-22-078-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Laura Frankart, Pharm.D., M.Ed., BCPS, Director of Education and Assessment, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Krista L. Donohoe, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP, Associate Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University

2:15 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Check, Check 1-2: Routine Checkups and Early Intervention During IPPEs and APPEs

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

This session will explore the early check-in process for students in IPPEs and APPEs and how experiential education programs can utilize this process to identify barriers that may impact student performance on rotation. This session will also discuss the different types of interventions and resources used to promote student success in overcoming issues assessed during the early check-in process.

(Speaker) Mabel Truong, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor, Director of Institutional APPEs, University of Houston; (Speaker) Shane Tolleson, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor; Director of Ambulatory Care APPEs, University of Houston

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Leveraging the IPEC Competencies to Transform Health Professions Education

Texas Ballroom

The Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) partnered with the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio to develop an institutional assessment instrument rooted in the IPEC competency framework. During this session, we will discuss the process of developing this instrument and the identified institutional characteristics associated with high-quality programmatic IPE.

(Speaker) Joseph Zorek, Pharm.D., Director, Linking Interprofessional Networks for Collaboration (LINC); Associate Professor, School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio; (Speaker) Kelly R. Ragucci, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, Vice President of Professional Development, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

How to Assess Your Course Intervention for a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Publication

Grapevine B

Scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) publications that describe course interventions are important in understanding how to best design learning environments. Due to lack of formal training in SoTL, pharmacy educators frequently struggle in the assessment of these interventions. This session will summarize the literature on approaches of course intervention assessment, including their advantages, disadvantages, and frequency of usage. A framework for better practices for assessment of course interventions will be provided.

(Speaker) Eytan A. Klausner, B.Pharm, Ph.D., Associate Professor, South College School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Adam Persky, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Curricular Review: How SACRED is Your Process?

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Due to the rapid changes in pharmacy practice, Pharm.D. curricula need to strategically and quickly adapt. To ensure pharmacy students are prepared for these changes, Idaho State University College of Pharmacy utilizes a comprehensive curricular review process that allows for the annual evaluation of the College's entire Pharm.D. curriculum. SACRED was designed to facilitate coordinated, faculty-led course and curricular improvements that are responsive to contemporary practice changes.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Determine advantages and disadvantages of an annual curricular review process.
  2. Summarize the Sustainable Annual Course Review Evaluation and Development (SACRED) process of curricular review.

0581-0000-22-079-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Tracy K. Pettinger, Pharm.D, Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice; Office of Experiential Education Zone Liaison, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Kevin Cleveland, Pharm.D., ANP, Associate Professor, Idaho State University College of Pharmacy

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Integrative Health Competencies: Three Curricular/Co-curricular Implementation Approaches

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Pharmacy competencies in integrative health care, developed by The National Center for Integrative Primary Healthcare, are well aligned with the CAPE outcomes and Bloom’s Taxonomy, and proposed as a framework for educational initiatives for pharmacy students. This program will provide background regarding the competencies development, describe key elements of three curricular/co-curricular approaches for implementing integrative health learning activities, and allow attendees to share and learn from approaches at their programs.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Illustrate background of pharmacy competencies in integrative health care development and identify gaps.
  2. Describe key elements of approaches for implementing Integrative Health learning among three schools of pharmacy.
  3. Discuss key elements of participating school experiences/approaches with implementing Integrative Health within Pharm.D. curriculum.

0581-0000-22-080-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Jan Hirsch, B.S.Pharm., Ph.D., FNAP, Dean, University of California, Irvine; (Speaker) Virginia Lemay, Pharm.D., CDOE, CVDOE, Clinical Associate Professor, The University of Rhode Island; (Speaker): Jeannie K. Lee, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP, FASHP, AGSF, Assistant Dean and Associate Professor, The University of Arizona

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Moving From Professionalism to Professional Identity Formation: Because It’s More Than the White Coat

Grapevine D

What does it mean to “be” a pharmacist? How does an individual come to “think, act, and feel” like a pharmacist? This session will introduce participants to the concept of professional identity formation (PIF) utilizing small group discussions and activities that allow participants to explore their own journeys in identity. The session will present strategies to implement PIF within pharmacy training programs, and prompt participants to develop their own approaches grounded in traditional professionalism education.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe one important difference between professionalism and Professional Identity Formation.
  2. Identify key experiences contributing to one’s own sense of professional identity.
  3. Propose one adaptation to an existing curricular professionalism activity or interaction to more intentionally support PIF in learners.

0581-0000-22-081-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Jessica L. Johnson, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, William Carey University School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Sally A. Arif, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCP, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Lindsey Moseley, Pharm.D., M.Ed., Curricular Coordinator, Auburn University; (Speaker) Brittany Riley, Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS, Associate Professor and Director of Residencies, Marshall University; (Speaker) Karen J. Kopacek, M.S., R.Ph., Associate Dean for Student Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Madison

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Raising the Bar: Perspectives on Implementing a Standard of Care Regulatory Model

Austin 5, 6, 7

Join us for a session where we will discuss how pharmacy regulations may be impeding advancement of the pharmacy profession. This session will explore different regulatory models and their impact on the pharmacist’s ability to fully implement the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process. We will also share two different state’s experiences with implementing a standard of care regulatory model.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Define standard of care and bright line regulation as they relate to pharmacy practice.
  2. Describe the pharmacist patient care process, how it was developed, and discuss how regulatory models impact the pharmacist's ability to fully implement the pharmacist patient care process.
  3. Describe lessons learned from one state that has implemented standard of care regulation, and one state that is considering implementation.

0581-0000-22-082-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Adams, Pharm.D., Ed.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs/Clinical Associate Professor, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Diane Ginsburg, Ph.D., M.S., R.Ph., FASHP, Associate Dean for Healthcare Partnerships, Clinical Professor of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Texas at Austin

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Taking the Leap Into Leadership

Grapevine C

The Academy needs leaders who are well-prepared to meet the increasing demands placed on pharmacy education. Women at various stages of their careers need different kinds of mentoring and assistance in overcoming barriers to advancement. The program will challenge participants to consider their individual career paths, to seek appropriate mentorship, and to better understand how to prepare for advanced leadership roles.

(Moderator) Patricia Chase, Ph.D., Dean Emerita and Clinical Professor, West Virginia University and Oregon State University; (Speaker) Marilyn Speedie, Ph.D., Dean and Professor Emerita, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Kelly Shields, Pharm.D., Associate Dean, Ohio Northern University; (Speaker) Rosalie Sagraves, Dean Emerita, UIC College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jaclyn Boyle, Pharm.D., M.S., M.B.A., BCACP, Assistant Dean of Student Success, Northeast Ohio Medical University

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Pivoting Your Career in Academia: It Isn’t Plan B, It’s Part of the Process

Dallas 5, 6, 7

Clinical pharmacy academia presents opportunities for career transitions, such as promotion/tenure or entering pharmacy academic administration. The literature has highlighted the need for succession planning at colleges/schools of pharmacy within academic administration, but there is often little guidance to faculty on navigating the challenges of an academic career change. In this session, pharmacy faculty who have successfully navigated this change will discuss how to pivot and pursue a career in pharmacy academic administration, and session attendees will actively explore opportunities to enhance professional growth and mitigate career burnout.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Examine at least three career opportunities in pharmacy academic administration.
  2. Explore opportunities within academia to enhance professional growth and mitigate career burnout.
  3. Create an outline of steps that you can take to successfully transition into pharmacy academic administration.

0581-0000-22-060-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator) Chasity M. Shelton, B.S., Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BCPPS, Assistant Dean, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Jill Morgan, Pharm.D., Professor and Chair, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Tracy M. Hagemann, Pharm.D., FCCP, FPPA, Associate Dean and Professor, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Elizabeth A. Hall, Pharm.D., Director of Assessment & Assistant Professor, The University of Tennessee

3:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Exhibitors’ Opening Reception

Longhorn Exhibit Hall E, F

3:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Research/Education Poster Session by Section and School Posters

Longhorn Exhibit Hall E, F

Experiential Education, Pharmaceutics, Pharmacy Practice, Social and Administrative Sciences

3:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Ready, Set, APPE: Structure and Assessment of a One Week APPE Readiness Course

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Every university/college of pharmacy is required to assess student readiness for advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE). In this session, we will discuss the innovative structure of a one week APPE Readiness course where students are assessed on their ability to provide patient care at an Entrustable Professional Activities (EPA) level II in the four required practice settings of general medicine, ambulatory care, hospital practice, and community.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify what skills are needed for students to be APPE ready and define APPE readiness.
  2. Describe a method for assessing APPE readiness utilizing a short-term focused course.

0581-0000-22-083-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Stacy Miller, Pharm.D., M.B.A., BCACP, Assistant Dean for Clinical Education, University of Florida; (Speaker) Lisa Vandervoort, Pharm.D., Clinical Lecturer, University of Florida

3:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Show Me the Money: Financial Sponsorship of Minoritized Trainees Transforms the Pharmacy Pipeline

Grapevine B

Underrepresented minority (URM) trainees often face financial barriers compared to others when graduating pharmacy school, largely due to systemic racism. Financial sponsorship can better position trainees to become successful pharmacists. PharmGradWishList was formed in April 2021 to support URM pharmacy trainees. In its first seven months, the initiative engaged 220 website-based sponsors, raised $11,040 for eight crowdfunding campaigns, and awarded 19 scholarships. This session will explore the impact of financial sponsorship on URM pharmacy trainees.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Compare the current demographic composition of participant’s respective institution to the U.S. population.
  2. Identify strategies to support underrepresented minority trainees.

0581-0000-22-084-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Kevin N. Astle, Pharm.D., Assistant Clinical Professor, Auburn University; (Speaker) Lindsey M. Childs-Kean, Pharm.D., M.P.H., BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Florida

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Innovation in Teaching Award

Texas 1, 2, 3

The recipient of the 2022 Innovation in Teaching Award will present the winning submission: A Comprehensive Instructional Model to Develop a Transformed Pharmacy Degree by Daniel T. Malone, Kirsten J. Galbraith, Kayley M. Lyons, Tina P. Brock, Ian C. Larson, Paul J. White, Vivienne Mak, Director, Health & Clinical Programs, Keypath Education.

(Moderator) Cynthia J. Boyle, Pharm.D., FAPhA, FNAP, FASCP, Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Dan Malone, Monash University; (Speaker) Kirstie Galbraith, Monash University

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

50th Anniversary Commission for the House of Delegates

Grapevine A

By Invitation Only

6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Past Presidents Dinner

Offsite

By Invitation Only


Monday, July 25

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Center Pre-function

7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Center Pre-function

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2022. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions and assist with the AACP meeting app.

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Focus Group: Certiphi Screening

Ft Worth 1, 2

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Deliberate Incorporation and Assessment of Interprofessional Education During Experiential Rotations

Grapevine B

Interprofessional education (IPE) is a required component of pharmacy education and should be incorporated into both didactic and experiential education. This program will present a longitudinal IPE curriculum threaded throughout a Pharm.D. plan of study, with particular emphasis on the incorporation and assessment of IPE experiences and collaboration during experiential rotations. It will give examples of activities and assessments that can document different levels and types of IPE experiences and with whom students collaborate.

(Speaker) Zachary A. Weber, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, CDCES, FASHP, Director of Interprofessional Education and Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Experiences from the Field: Academic Detailing to Increase Community Pharmacy Engagement in Harm Reduction

Grapevine A

Academic detailing is an established face-to-face, interactive educational intervention directed at healthcare professionals to improve clinical practice. Recently, there has been growing interest in using this technique to evoke change in community pharmacies, particularly around public health issues. This session will orient attendees to academic detailing and then describe how detailing has been successfully implemented in two projects aimed at increasing community pharmacy engagement in harm reduction.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the goals and key components of academic detailing and harm reduction.
  2. Discuss specific examples, evidence, and best practices for how academic detailing has been used to create change in community pharmacies to address harm reduction.
  3. Design an opportunity at your home institution where academic detailing could be integrated into teaching, community outreach, or scholarship efforts as it pertains to harm reduction.

0581-0000-22-105-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator) Samantha Odem, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, William Carey University; (Speaker) Adriane N. Irwin, M.S., Pharm.D., Clinical Associate Professor, Oregon State University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jeffrey P. Bratberg, Pharm.D., FAPhA, Clinical Professor, The University of Rhode Island; (Speaker) Kirk E. Evoy, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Austin

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

For Wellness Sake, We Need Equity-Minded Faculty Workloads Right Now

Texas Ballroom

We train students to be patient-centered. We ask faculty to be student-centered. But are we faculty-centered? Leaders must protect their greatest asset, the faculty. Workload inequities, lack of clarity, and lack of transparency create environments that negatively impact the wellness of faculty. This session will share what faculty should advocate for and what administrators must do now to start the process of healing our faculty and move toward an equity-minded faculty workload.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify habits and routines within an organization that may negatively impact faculty wellness.
  2. Discuss inequities in faculty workload and its impact on the wellness of faculty.
  3. Demonstrate how the patient care process and the American Council for Education (ACE) Equity-Minded Workload Principles can provide a framework for evaluating faculty workload.

0581-0000-22-086-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Michael J. Fulford, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Institutional Effectiveness and Strategic Initiatives, and Director of Faculty Affairs, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, Pharm.D., BCPS, Professor and Vice Chair, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Lisa M. Meny, Pharm.D., Professor, Accreditation and Assessment Coordinator, Ferris State University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

From “Boring” to Fun: Strategies to Improve Student Engagement and Learning Outcomes for SAS-Related Topics

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

This session highlights novel approaches to improving student engagement and learning outcomes for social and administrative sciences-related courses. Speakers will share experiences regarding: 1) a flipped classroom approach for teaching biostatistics, 2) using film festival and storytelling activities to engage student teams in legal and substance abuse topics, and 3) integration of photographs or music in a reflective writing assignment in a patient decision-making course.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe novel strategies for engaging student pharmacists in SAS-related topics, such as biostatistics, pharmacy law, and patient decision-making, in Doctor of Pharmacy curricula.
  2. Describe assessment strategies, including pre-post evaluations and rubrics, for evaluating the impact of strategies used to engage student pharmacists in SAS-related topics.
  3. Use Think-Pair-Share to discuss attendees experiences using active learning and reflection strategies for SAS-related topics.

0581-0000-22-087-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Chair & Moderator): Leticia R. Moczygemba, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Sarah J. Steinhardt, Pharm.D., J.D.(Esq), M.S., Assistant Professor, USF Health Taneja College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Mary Gurney, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Midwestern University College of Pharmacy, Glendale Campus

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Preparing Pharmacists for a Diverse World: Incorporation of Patient Populations Into Clinical Cases and Beyond

Grapevine D

Are you having difficulty embracing race and ethnicity into your curricular materials? How are you writing cases with the whole patient in mind? What details can you incorporate to embrace diversity appropriately? This session can help you brainstorm ideas for your classroom materials, and create unique experiential opportunities.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Highlight recent guidance published for the reporting of race and ethnicity.
  2. Discuss faculty experiences for integrating diverse patient populations within the classroom and experiential opportunities.
  3. Apply provided methodology to incorporate diversity to personal classroom and experiential activities.

0581-0000-22-088-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Chair) Nancy Borja-Hart, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Olihe Okoro, Ph.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Lauren Jonkman, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Jeri Sias, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Clinical Professor, The University of Texas at El Paso

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Reports of the 2021–2022 Standing Committees

Austin 5, 6, 7

The session provides interested attendees an opportunity to interact with the standing committees: Academic Affairs, Argus Commission, Professional Affairs, Research and Graduate Affairs, Strategic Engagement, and Student Affairs. Following brief presentations by committee chairs on the key recommendations contained in the report, discussions on the reports and implementation strategies will be led by committee members.

(Speaker) M. Lynn Crismon, Pharm.D., FCCP, DABCP, BCPP, Professor, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Joseph T. DiPiro, Pharm.D., Associate Vice President of Faculty Affairs, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) George E. MacKinnon III, Ph.D., M.S., R.Ph., Founding Dean, Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, Ed.D., Associate Dean/Professor, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Brent N. Reed, Pharm.D., M.S., BCCP, Clinical Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Alan J. Zillich, Pharm.D., FCCP, Professor, Purdue University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Setting the Academic GPS for Resilience and Mental Health: Separate Roads or Paths that Cross?

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

This session, based in Self-Determination Theory and Locus of Control, examines the relationship between resilience and mental health wellness from a socio-cultural and generational lens, with impact on student success. Both students and pharmacy educators will answer questions in debate-style format: Is there is a balance between internal and external locus of control on the path to wellness? What is the responsibility of Pharm.D. programs to meet those needs while ensuring achievement of academic outcomes?

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. List socio-cultural and generational differences in perceptions impacting resilience and mental well-being.
  2. Evaluate the impact of workload/rigor of pharmacy curricula vs. fundamental deficits in protective self-care measures on student mental health.
  3. Develop a plan to incorporate best practices for supporting student mental well-being.

0581-0000-22-089-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Heather MW Petrelli, Ph.D., M.A., Associate Dean for Student Affairs, University of South Florida Taneja College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Schoelles, Pharm.D., Associate Dean for Student Affairs, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Elizabeth Rogers, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, University of Houston; (Speaker) Easton K. Bracey, Pharm.D. Candidate, University of South Florida Taneja College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jeanette Lahoud, Pharm.D. Candidate, University of Houston College of Pharmacy 

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Stronger Together: Collaborating with Librarians to Teach Evidence Based Decision Making

Grapevine C

Librarians possess skills essential to supporting evidence-based decision-making in student pharmacists. Schools and colleges of pharmacy have an opportunity to collaborate with librarians to streamline the delivery of drug information and appropriate resource utilization. This session highlights the strategies utilized by three pharmacy programs to create mutually beneficial collaborations between librarians and pharmacy faculty. Participants will develop an action plan to integrate librarians into a single class, course, or curriculum at their home institutions.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize the expertise of librarian colleagues in their ability to support student pharmacists in evidence-based practices.
  2. Identify opportunities for collaboration with librarian colleagues.
  3. Develop a plan to integrate librarians in the pharmacy curriculum.

0581-0000-22-090-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Robin Parker, Pharm.D., BCGP, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Priya Shenoy, B.S.N., M.L.I.S., Graduate Health Professions Librarian, Drake University; (Speaker) Michelle M. Bottenberg, Pharm.D., BCPS, Professor, Drake University; (Speaker) Jason B. Reed, MLS, Assistant Professor of Library Science, Purdue University; (Speaker) Alex N. Isaacs, Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 2

Texas 1, 2, 3

The list of roundtable topics and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app.

(Moderator) Bernadette Brown, Pharm.D., Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University COPHS

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

What is Special About Specialty Pharmaceuticals? Integrating Biologics and Specialty Pharmaceuticals Into the Pharm.D. Curriculum

Dallas 5, 6, 7

There has been a rapid growth of new biologics and specialty pharmaceuticals. While ACPE does not provide explicit standards on this topic, many schools have incorporated certain elements in their curricula. This session will bring together faculty from basic science and pharmacy practice to discuss the opportunities and challenges on this effort. The goal is to share best practices and encourage coordination between science and practice faculty to optimize the longitudinal learning outcomes for students.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the essential science and practice learning outcomes for pharmacy students as related to biologics and specialty drugs.
  2. Provide best practice examples of incorporating the above topics in a Pharm.D. curriculum.
  3. Identify strategies for future implementation at participants’ home institutions.

0581-0000-22-091-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Karen Nagel-Edwards, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Midwestern University-College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Sun Lee, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, High Point University; (Speaker) Ava Vargason, Ph.D., Project Manager, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

8:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Open

Longhorn Exhibit Hall E, F

8:00 a.m.–9:30 p.m.

NACDS Foundation's Innovative Research Row

Longhorn Marble Foyer

The NACDS Foundation is pleased to present posters detailing the research projects of our esteemed Faculty Scholars. Come meet our Scholars at the Longhorn Marble Foyer and see the line-up of projects, delving into innovative care delivery models and promoting creative approaches to address chronic care and medication management—all promising concepts that can be scaled into real-world solutions. Through their work to improve community health, our Scholars are driving the Foundation’s goals to enhance health outcomes, foster equity, strengthen access, and advance public health.

8:45 a.m.–9:15 a.m.

Shifting the Paradigm to Entrustment: Best Practices and Preceptor Resources to Facilitate Development of Trust

Grapevine B

There is a paradigm shift in assessing student performance in experiential education from competency-based to entrustment-based assessment. As pharmacy programs start implementing EPAs as part of their experiential programs, implementation questions arise around preceptor development needs and how to best support preceptors in making the shift to an assessment strategy based on trust. This session will provide practical approaches to operationalize EPAs for assessment and example resources for engaging preceptors in implementing an EPA-based program.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe 2 best practices in operationalizing EPAs for assessment in experiential education.
  2. Prioritize 1 action item to better align your institution’s EE program with best practices in using EPAs for assessment.

0581-0000-22-092-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Rachel A. Allen, Pharm.D., BCACP, Clinical Assistant Professor, Director, Bracken Pharmacy Learning Center, University of Washington; (Speaker) Jennifer Chang, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Preceptor Development, University of Washington

9:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Research/Education Poster Session by Section

Longhorn Exhibit Hall E, F

Administrative Sciences, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Continuing Professional Development, Drug Information and Library Science and School Posters, Trainee Finalists Posters, NIA Posters, AACP Award Posters

9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

AACP Headshot Café

Center Pre-function

Sponsored by Walgreen Co.

Enhance your AACP Connect, LinkedIn and other social media profiles! Visit the AACP Headshot Café, sponsored by Walgreen Co., for a headshot taken by expert photographers.

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

“Disconnected”: Using Creative Problem-Solving Strategies to Identify and Address Barriers to Rural Experiential Education

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Rural education experiences have various benefits for students, providers, and patients living in these regions; however, these sites are often underutilized and less desired by students. Questions remain about why. This session will describe how creative problem-solving strategies can be used to connect with students, providers, and administrators to identify barriers to rural experiential education programs. In addition, the program will offer strategies to help others as they generate and test solutions to these challenges.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify resources to facilitate creative problem solving and address rural education needs.
  2. Apply creative problem-solving strategies to identify and address barriers to rural education needs.

0581-0000-22-093-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Stephanie Kiser, B.S.Pharm., Director of Rural Health, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Curriculum Innovation and Assessment, High Point University School of Dental Medicine

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Strategies for Evaluating the Experiences of Underrepresented Learners: Employing QuantCrit Methods

Grapevine B

Schools of pharmacy place significant efforts toward recruiting, supporting, and retaining underrepresented learners yet the analytic strategies for measuring the success of such initiatives may not capture the complexity of their experiences. Quantitative Critical (QuantCrit) Methods enable us to assess and evaluate the outcomes of underrepresented learners more thoughtfully. In this session, we share implications for adopting a QuantCrit approach to improve data collection strategies, innovate statistical tests, and shape the ways we interpret results.

(Speaker) Kyle Fassett, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

“The Environment Was Just Ice”: From Desegregation to Diversity and Inclusion

Grapevine D

Desegregation at southern schools of pharmacy was a slow process, with schools admitting their first Black students between the late 1940s and the late 1960s. The stories of the first Black students are rarely told, yet this history is recent enough that many of these pioneers are still alive. By collecting and sharing stories of this complex and uncomfortable history, schools can better understand their own histories and support diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts.

(Speaker) Benjamin Y. Urick, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Health Outcomes Research Principal, Prime Therapeutics; (Speaker) Christian Brown, Pharm.D. Candidate, 2023, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Fostering Creativity and Innovation: Developing Entrepreneurial Skills and an Intrapreneurial Mindset in Student Pharmacists

Austin 5, 6, 7

Creative thinking is one of the most sought-after skills by employers and yet, in pharmacy education, it has not been intentionally fostered. Small adjustments in the way a question is phrased, a case designed, or an activity is created can have a significant impact on skill development in our students. Ensuring student success in entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial skills will enable them to adapt to the rapidly changing practice models and job opportunities of the future.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify current techniques and activities in pharmacy education that encourage entrepreneurship and innovation.
  2. Discuss the role creativity plays in entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial skills and mindset.
  3. Develop an individual plan to foster creative thinking and innovation in student pharmacists to enable success.

0581-0000-22-094-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Tracy M. Hagemann, Pharm.D., FCCP, FPPA, Associate Dean and Professor, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Kevin M. Olson, M.B.A., Pharm.D., Assistant Professor/Director Entrepreneurial Academy, University of South Florida Taneja College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Huy T. Hoang, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, Pacific University Oregon

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Jolly Good Fellows—Establishing New Career Pathways Through the Development of Collaborative Fellowships

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Collaborations—across institutions, health systems, and industries—have the potential to transform health worldwide. Therefore, the next generation of academic pharmacy leaders must be skilled collaborators—within the Academy and around the globe. This can be achieved by incorporating multiple scientific domains and collaboration into fellowships. In this session for academics engaged in fellowship training, we will share examples of collaborative fellowships, including justification and examples of post fellowship career pathways.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the drivers for developing collaborative academic fellowships to support contemporary pharmacy education and practice.
  2. Explain the mechanisms by which these collaborative academic fellowships can be developed, including incorporation of Community of Practice and Cognitive Apprenticeship learning theories.
  3. Identify one collaborative academic fellowship opportunity that could be implemented at the participant’s institution.

0581-0000-22-095-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Caroline W. Sasser, Pharm.D., PharmAlliance Program Coordinator, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Monash University Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, UCL School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Dean, College of Global Population Health, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis; (Speaker) Marian T. Costelloe, M.A., General Manager, Monash University Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; (Speaker) Tina Brock, B.S.Pharm., M.S., Ed.D., Associate Dean for Education, Professor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus; (Speaker) Kayley Lyons, Pharm.D., Ed.D., Digital Health Workforce Development Lead, University of Melbourne

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Preventing Review Roadblocks: Developing High-Quality and Efficient Pharmacy Systematic Reviews

Texas 1, 2, 3

This session addresses updates in methodologies, technologies, and best practices for efficient pharmacy systematic reviews. High quality reviews are valuable to clinical and academic pharmacists, but the methods are evolving and the available literature growing rapidly. Whether pharmacists are conducting systematic reviews, or mentoring trainees through them, success depends on avoiding common pitfalls. Participants will actively participate in the review process, try online review tools, and learn the value of an interprofessional team to reviews.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the currently recommended steps of the systematic review process.
  2. Identify new and essential technology tools for completing a systematic review.
  3. Discuss the value of an interprofessional team to the systematic review process.

0581-0000-22-096-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Rebecca Carlson, MLS, AHIP, Health Sciences Librarian and Liaison to the Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Emily P. Jones, M.L.I.S., AHIP, Health Sciences Librarian, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jason B. Reed, MLS, Assistant Professor of Library Science, Purdue University; (Speaker) Jennifer R. Martin, M.A., Librarian & Clinical Instructor, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Christopher Wisniewski, Pharm.D., Professor of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcome Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

The Clinical Pharmacist Identity as A Mindset—Elevating Pharmacy Practice Potential in All Settings

Grapevine A

Clinical pharmacy practice is often connected to specialty situations associated with acute care/ambulatory settings and complex patients. Here, we present a model that highlights pharmacy knowledge, skills, attitudes, “lived experiences,” and mindset elements that can be widely applied in any setting. Targeting academic leaders and faculty, and aligned with the AACP Strategic Plan 2021–2024, this session delineates a methodology for clinicians to approach problem-solving as a value element in the Pharm.D. curriculum and co-curriculum.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Define clinical pharmacy as contextualized within the current understanding and application of patient care within the curriculum different.
  2. Apply strategies to connect clinical pharmacy practice models with examples of practice and elements of the PCPP, EPAs, CAPE Outcomes, and mindset elements necessary to effectively practice.
  3. Identify one curricular and/or co-curricular strategy that can help reframe the approach to teaching about the potential for integrating, and recognizing, the clinical pharmacy potential and mindset in all practice settings.

0581-0000-22-097-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Brian A. Hemstreet, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Professor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus; (Speaker) David Fuentes, Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, Ed.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, University of Portland School of Nursing; (Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, Pharm.B.S., M.S., Ph.D., FAPE, Assistant Dean for Accreditation and Program Development; Director, Institute of Teaching & Learning, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, Pharm.D., Ed.D.c., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Chicago State University

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

A "Presidential" Debate on Grading Clinical Education

Dallas 5, 6, 7

With movement towards competency-based education and Entrustable Professional Activities, the method for assessing experiential education has become increasing complex. This session will debate the use of the traditional grading system (ABCDF) in the experiential setting versus a more dichotomous grading systems (Pass vs. Fail). We assume that grades measure clinical competence, motivate students to perform, and are great sources of performance feedback. In this session, we will challenge the Academy to rethink experiential grading.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe key terminology (formative vs. summative assessment, feedback, competency-based education, entrustable professional educations).
  2. Compare and contrast traditional grading and pass/fail grading in experiential education.
  3. Hypothesize assessment models that might more accurately be used to accommodate future pharmacy education.

0581-0000-22-098-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Moderator) Adam Persky, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Kathryn Fuller, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Craig Cox, Pharm.D., Professor Pharmacy Practice and Vice Chair for Experiential Programs, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Jerry H. Hodge School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Bradley Cannon, Pharm.D., Director of Experiential Education, Assistant Professor, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

The Science of Stress and How to Improve Well-being of Our Students, Faculty, and Staff

Texas 4, 5, 6

What happens to your body during stress? What is a stress cycle, and how can we end it? This program explains the body’s physiological reaction to stress and burnout. The session will also provide non-pharmacological ways to improve well-being. The second half of the program focuses on how various institutions are tackling this problem for their students, faculty, and staff.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the body’s biological response to stress and cycles that lead to physical, emotional, and mental changes in well-being.
  2. Utilize and share non-pharmacological tools for well-being for students, faculty, and staff.
  3. Begin to create programs to enhance student, faculty, and staff well-being that are specific to your institution’s needs.

0581-0000-22-099-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Diane Calinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Vice Chair of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manchester University; (Speaker) Lipika Chablani, Ph.D., Associate Professor, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Teresa M. Elsobky, Pharm.D., BCPP, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Director of Student Affairs, Shenandoah University; (Speaker) Diane Ginsburg, Ph.D., M.S., R.Ph., FASHP, Associate Dean for Healthcare Partnerships, Clinical Professor of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin

10:15 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

The Crystal Ball of Student Success: Association of Didactic and Skills Assessments to APPE Performance

Grapevine B

Supporting students who are struggling in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs) can be time consuming and heartbreaking, especially when traditional methods and student performance cutoffs may not have identified these students. This session will share a process to identify potential poor APPE performers through correlation of didactic and skills assessments to APPE performance. Through this process, pharmacy programs may be able to better target early interventions for students at greater risk for poor APPE performance.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe a process to evaluate the association between student performance in didactic courses and skills-based assessments with APPE performance.
  2. Outline actionable steps that programs can take to reduce the risk of poor APPE performance.

0581-0000-22-100-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Amanda Margolis, Pharm.D., M.S., BCACP, Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Andrea L. Porter, Pharm.D., Associate Professor (CHS), University of Wisconsin-Madison

10:15 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

From “Ugh” to “UX”: How to Conduct User Experience (UX) Research in Pharmacy Education

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Curious how to conduct research that explores the user experience? For example, want to know what students think about when they complete a learning activity or how to design your learning management system so it is easier to navigate? User experience (UX) research can address these questions and more in pharmacy education practices. In this session, participants will learn about techniques to conduct UX research and explore how to expand their research methods toolbox.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the user experience (UX) research approach and techniques to conduct UX research.
  2. Outline the design for a study that incorporates UX research methods.

0581-0000-22-101-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Curriculum Innovation and Assessment, High Point University School of Dental Medicine; (Speaker) Amy M. Pick, Pharm.D., M.S., BCOP, Assistant Dean for Experiential Education, University of Nebraska Medical Center

10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Monday General Session: Our Shared Commitment to Health Equity

Texas Ballroom

In this fireside chat led by AACP Immediate Past President Anne Lin, Dr. Jerome Adams, a Presidential Fellow and the Executive Director of Purdue University’s Health Equity Initiatives, will help attendees achieve a deeper understanding of health equity and identify strategies for the profession, and academic pharmacy more specifically, to engage in achieving the goals at local, regional, and national levels.

(Moderator) Anne Lin, Pharm.D., FNAP, Dean and Professor, School of Pharmacy, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Jerome Adams, M.D., M.P.H., FASA, Presidential Fellow, Executive Director of Purdue's Health Equity Initiatives, and Distinguished Professor of Practice, Purdue University

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Promoting Wellbeing During Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Strategies for Building a Successful Wellness Series

Grapevine B

Wellness among student pharmacists remains a cause for concern. There is a gap in wellness programming particularly for learners in their last year of pharmacy school. This session will describe a pilot virtual three-part wellness series, “Navigating the APPE Year: Insights and Strategies for Success,” developed to address the unique challenges that students in their final clinical year experience. Logistics, best practices, lessons learned, and the positive impacts on students will be shared.

(Speaker) Christina Mnatzaganian, Pharm.D., BCACP, Clinical Associate Professor, University of California San Diego; (Speaker) Kelly Lee, Pharm.D., M.A.S., BCPP, Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, Associate Dean for Assessment and Accreditation, University of California San Diego

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Closing the Loop on Naloxone Training

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

How can we help students translate classroom learning into experiential settings? This program will describe the development and results of a didactic-experiential model for teaching students about opioid use disorder and naloxone counseling for patients and family members. The model’s three phases will be presented: 1) lecture-based education (naloxone pharmacology and opioid use disorder); 2) skills lab (naloxone administration and counseling training); and 3) Community Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (real-world naloxone recommendations and counseling).

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the purpose and structure of a didactic-experiential educational model, including designing intentional student learning activities, exposing students to interprofessional experiences, and incorporating preceptors.
  2. Discuss the challenges and successes encountered during the development and implementation of a didactic-experiential naloxone learning module.

0581-0000-22-102-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Rebecca Maxson, Pharm.D., M.S., Associate Clinical Professor, Auburn University; (Speaker) Lena McDowell, Pharm.D., Assistant Clinical Professor, Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences Coordinator, Auburn, University

11:00 a.m.–Noon

The High-wire Act of Impostor Phenomenon, Engagement, and Burnout: Why Haven’t We Figured These Out?

Grapevine A

Burnout, engagement, and impostor phenomenon (IP) are hot topics of discussion and research related to student and faculty well-being. While related, these concepts are different and have nuances that impact how data are interpreted. But with all of the research, why haven’t we figured these issues out? This session explores literature and experiences at different institutions. Attendees will leave with practical ideas of how these concepts should be understood and used in future scholarship.

(Speaker) Jaclyn Boyle, Pharm.D., M.S., M.B.A., BCACP, Assistant Dean of Student Success, Northeast Ohio Medical University; (Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Jeff Cain, Ed.D., M.S., Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Alex Barker, Pharm.D., CEO and Founder, The Happy PharmD

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Advancing Pharmacy Simulation: Updates to the Standards of Best Practice

Grapevine C

The Healthcare Simulation Standards of Best Practice, released in September 2021, provide evidence-based guidelines for simulation-based experiences. This session will include an overview of the updated Standards, focusing on operations and the new professional development standard. Panelists will also share their experiences applying the Standards in pharmacy education and guide participants through application-based exercises and case studies. Whether newer to developing simulation activities or utilizing simulation for years, this session is for you!

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Apply the Healthcare Simulation Standards of Best Practice (HSSOBP) Operations standard to given scenarios to optimize simulation-based experiences.
  2. Perform an educational needs assessment, applying the HSSOBP Professional Development standard.
  3. Identify 3 resources for simulation professional development.

0581-0000-22-103-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Kelly A. Lempicki, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Director, Clinical Skills and Simulation Center, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Erini S. Serag-Bolos, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Chelsea Renfro, Pharm.D., CHSE, Assistant Professor and Coordinator for Interprofessional and Simulation-based Education, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Jennifer Beall, Pharm.D., CHSE, Director, Pharmacy Labs and Simulation, Samford University; (Speaker) Leslie Andrews, Pharm.D., BCCCP, BCPS, CHSE, Clinical Professor, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Demystifying Critical Theory: Understanding Critical Race, Feminism, and Queer Theories in Pharmacy Education

Texas 4, 5, 6

Critical Race Theory (CRT) has generated considerable public dialogue and controversy. However, the meaning of CRT and its use in pharmacy education remains unclear. What are critical theories? And how do CRT, and other critical theories, intersect with pharmacy education? This session will review basic tenets of common critical theories (CRT, Feminism, Queer Theory), explore their use in health professions education, and discuss how they can be used to inform and influence pharmacy education.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Define critical theory – including Critical Race Theory, Feminism, and Queer Theory.
  2. Describe the use of critical theories in health professions education research.
  3. Identify ways in which critical theories can be used to inform pharmacy education.

0581-0000-22-104-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Antonio Bush, Ph.D., Director of Research, Association of American Medical Colleges; (Speaker) Nicole Winston, M.S., Pharm.D., EdS, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University; (Speaker) Kyle Fassett, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Don’t Wreck it Ralph! Navigating New Technology in the Classroom

Austin 5, 6, 7

This session will focus on new technologies utilized at multiple institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic and how these adaptations can be optimized for classrooms of the future. Leveraging students’ familiarity with common technologies allows for better engagement in the classroom. Presenters will demonstrate different technologies for learning including utilization of iPads in hybrid courses, creative development of asynchronous videos, and competitions using polling software.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how innovative technologies can be used in the didactic curriculum.
  2. Identify how these technological strategies can increase student engagement.
  3. Outline a plan to incorporate one new technology in the classroom.

0581-0000-22-085-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jason W. Guy, Pharm.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, University of Findlay; (Speaker) Christopher Wisniewski, Pharm.D., Professor of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcome Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Julie H. Oestreich, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Findlay; (Speaker) Rachel Whitney, M.L.I.S., Research and Education Informationist, Medical University of South Carolina

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Go-Local: Embedding Global Competencies and Enriching DEI Through Service-Learning to Underserved, Immigrant, and Refugee Communities

Dallas 5, 6, 7

“Going Global By Starting Local”. Global competencies such as cultural sensitivity and diversity training are challenging to teach and assess. Service learning programs focused on the medically underserved international, immigrant, and refugee communities offer a novel mechanism for inclusion of these competencies. Faculty from three universities will discuss a service learning blueprint for embedding these global competencies in pharmacy education alongside challenges and lessons learned, aligned with the AACP Strategic Plan 2021–2024.

(Moderator & Speaker) Islam N. Mohamed, B.Pharm., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, California Northstate University College of Pharmacy; (Moderator & Speaker) Tarek Kassem, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor, California Northstate University; (Moderator & Speaker: Ashim Malhotra, Pharm.BS, M.S., Ph.D., FAPE, Assistant Dean for Accreditation and Program Development; Director, Institute of Teaching & Learning, California Northstate University; (Moderator & Speaker) Naser Alsharif, Pharm.D., M.S., Ph.D.,Professor of Pharmacy Sciences, Creighton University; (Moderator & Speaker) Ahmed Abdelmageed, Pharm.D., Dean of the School of Pharmacy and Physician Assistant Studies, University of Saint Joseph

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Practical Tips for Writing a Successful Grant Application

Grapevine D

The goal of the session is educate the audience (faculty and trainees) on writing a strong grant application. The presentation will cover the basics of a strong application to both AACP NIA and the NIH, including the development of a hypothesis, the inclusion of success metrics, and the importance of choosing the correct mentor. The active learning section will focus on recognizing and modifying weak statements in applications to create award-winning statements.

(Speaker) Andrew Coop, Ph.D., Associate Dean & Professor, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Christopher Cunningham, Associate Professor, Concordia University Wisconsin

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Staying Ahead of the Curve: Leveraging the Curriculum, Co-curriculum and Coaching to Cultivate Career Preparedness

Texas 1, 2, 3

With the changing landscape of employment opportunities for pharmacists, Doctor of Pharmacy programs are increasing emphasis on career readiness as a vital component of ensuring professional satisfaction and gainful employment for graduates. In this session, three varied Doctor of Pharmacy programs will describe structured curricular and co-curricular approaches to career development, each leveraging institutional needs and resources. Discussion of each approach will include descriptions of successes and challenges experienced by the programs.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe both curricular and co-curricular strategies to prepare students for successful entry into the pharmacy workforce.
  2. Discuss benefits and potential challenges associated with the various approaches to career preparedness.
  3. Develop a plan to incorporate at least one new element of career development into the curriculum or co-curriculum at your institution.

0581-0000-22-106-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Stacy Miller, Pharm.D., M.B.A., BCACP, Assistant Dean for Clinical Education, University of Florida; (Speaker) Dale English II, R.Ph., B.S.Pharm., Pharm.D., FASHP, Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Sullivan University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) Karen Whalen, Pharm.D., BCPS, FAPhA, Assistant Dean and Clinical Professor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Priti Patel, Pharm.D., Director of Personal and Professional Development, University of Florida; (Speaker) Gregory J. Hughes, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP, Director of Co-curricula & Associate Clinical Professor, St. John's University

11:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Course Snapshot: A Simple Tool for Managing Annual Curriculum Reviews

Grapevine B

Implementing a continuous curriculum review process can be time consuming. This session will describe Course Snapshot, an online survey tool completed by course instructors that regularly tracks course trends and modifications, with the goal of maintaining, aligning, and improving curricular content and adapting to student learning needs. The process, trend reports, and examples of recommended changes will be shared along with discussion about strategies for incorporating the tool at your school.

(Speaker) Beth Martin, Ph.D., M.S., R.Ph., FAPhA Professor (CHS) and Assistant Dean for Assessment, Teaching & Learning, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Beth Janetski, Ph.D., M.F.A., Assistant Dean for Assessment and Academic Planning, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Lunch in Exhibit Hall

Longhorn Exhibit Hall E, F

A trip to Texas wouldn’t be complete without some authentic BBQ. Head to the Longhorn Exhibit Hall to enjoy a BBQ lunch buffet complete with all the fixings. Meet with exhibitors and learn about their solutions to help your work. 

Noon–1:30 p.m.

American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE) Editorial Board Meeting

Austin 1, 2, 3

By Invitation Only

(Moderator & Speaker) Gayle Brazeau, Ph.D., Professor, Marshall University

12:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Council of Faculties Business Meeting

Dallas 5, 6, 7

Annual business meeting for the Council of Faculties. All members of the Council of Faculties are invited to receive reports on current and future council priorities.

(Chair) Jennifer Trujillo, Pharm.D., BCPS, FCCP, CDCES, BC-ADM, Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

12:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Council of Deans (COD) Business Meeting

Austin 5, 6, 7

All members of the Council of Deans (COD) are invited to receive reports from the council's 2021–2022 standing committees and task forces. Voting on proposed revisions to the COD Standing Rules of Procedures will also be conducted.

(Chair) Renae Chesnut, Ed.D., M.B.A., B.S., Dean and Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Drake College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Meeting of the OMH Policy Advisory Board for project “Eliminating Generational Racial Health Disparities"

Ft. Worth 5, 6, 7

By Invitation Only

1:15 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

All for One and One for All: Upscaling and Individualizing Preceptor Development

Grapevine B

Stop spending time developing preceptor newsletters and webinars that are unseen by the majority of preceptors. Despite the widespread need for preceptor development, a one-size fits all approach does not work for adult learners with busy schedules. Engaging, effective, and efficient preceptor development is possible on both a small and large scale. This session provides examples of two innovative methods of preceptor development that can be replicated by experiential teams from other colleges/schools of pharmacy.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the need for robust preceptor development.
  2. Discuss novel modes of development through gaming and student delivered preceptor development.

0581-0000-22-107-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Lisa Richter, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP, FASHP, Director of Experiential Outreach & Assessment/Assistant Professor of Practice, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Jeanne E. Frenzel, Pharm.D., Ph.D., BCSCP, Professor, North Dakota State University

1:15 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Career Vitality Among Women Faculty Health Professional Academicians

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

To have career vitality, one aligns their personal and professional life commitments. In this session, presenters will describe attributes and key factors that influence career vitality as identified in a Delphi study that included women faculty from various health professions in the National Academies of Practice. The session will draw on literature and include facilitated discussions to support participants in developing and adopting strategies in an action planning exercise for individual professional and career development.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the key attributes and factors that can positively influence career vitality from the perspectives captured in a Delphi method study.
  2. Outline an action plan utilizing strategies and solutions to strengthen vitality and overcome barriers.

0581-0000-22-108-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Elizabeth Unni, Ph.D., M.B.A., B.Pharm., Chair & Associate Professor, Touro College of Pharmacy-New York; (Speaker) Seena L. Haines, Pharm.D., BCACP, NBC-HWC, CHWC, FASHP, FAPhA, FCCP, FNAP, RYT200, Professor and Chair, Department of Department of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Mississippi

1:15 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion of Faculty and Graduate Students: Where Are We and What’s Next?

Grapevine D

There is a critical need for diverse faculty and student populations to combat health disparities and racial inequities. This session will describe the current landscape of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) in pharmacy education and discuss results of an analysis of AACP Institutional Research data over a six year period. Participants will be challenged to consider approaches to enhance DEI in pharmacy education and provided with learning pearls to be implemented at their own institutions.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Illustrate the importance and current landscape of DEI in colleges/schools of pharmacy.
  2. Interpret results of AACP institutional research data from 2015-2020 identifying diversity of faculty and graduate students in colleges/schools of pharmacy and implications of national and global events.
  3. Synthesize actionable recommendations to enhance DEI of faculty and graduate students in colleges/schools of pharmacy.

0581-0000-22-109-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Surajit Dey, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Tessa J. Hastings, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Omolola A. Adeoye-Olatunde, Pharm.D., M.S., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University; (Speaker) Jingjing Qian, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Auburn University; (Speaker) Kristine Willett, Ph.D., Professor, The University of Mississippi

1:15 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Root Cause Analysis: Lessons Learned From Implementing Strategies to Improve Student and Programmatic Outcomes

Texas 1, 2, 3

Programs are facing several contemporary challenges such as the pandemic, license exam pass rates, decline in the quality/number of admission applications, progression and retention rates, faculty burnout, and student learning experience. Each institution is impacted differently by these issues and must find specific solutions. This session, targeting faculty and administrators, will allow attendees to assemble a tool-kit of actionable approaches for conducting a ‘Root Cause Analysis’ and associated action planning.

(Moderator & Speaker) Rahul Garg, Ph.D., Director of Evaluation and Outcomes Assessment, Division of Institutional Effectiveness, Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine; (Speaker) LaToya J. Braun, Ph.D., Director of Academic Affairs and Professor, Regis University; (Speaker) Marianne McCollum, Professor Emerita, Regis University School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, Pharm.D., EdD.c., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Chicago State University; (Speaker) David Fuentes, Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, Ed.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, University of Portland School of Nursing

1:15 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Getting Over the Hump: Barriers and Benefits to EPA Framework Assessments in Experiential Education

Grapevine C

Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) with entrustment-supervision scales assemble a workplace-based educational framework for assessment. EPA integration produces challenges for experiential education, within areas of preceptor development, assignment of letter grades, and mapping of assignments. This session will provide participants with a detailed landscape of the integration of an EPA assessment framework within three pharmacy experiential programs, with a focus on barriers and solutions to provide a roadmap to integrate this innovative competency-based model.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Highlight unique approaches for integrating an EPA assessment framework within experiential education across three different pharmacy institutions.
  2. Discuss barriers and solutions for implementing EPAs as an assessment framework for experiential education.
  3. Workshop individualized approaches to EPA assessment framework integration within experiential education.

0581-0000-22-110-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Jennie B. Jarrett, Pharm.D., BCPS, MMedEd, FCCP, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois Chicago; (Speaker) Jean Y. Moon, Pharm.D., BCACP, Associate Professor, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Connie Smith, Pharm.D., Associate Professor and Director of Experiential Education, The University of Louisiana at Monroe; (Speaker) Abigail T. Elmes, Pharm.D., BCPS, Research Fellow in Academia and Family Medicine, University of Illinois Chicago College of Pharmacy

1:15 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Global Perspectives on Cultural Intelligence Interventions in Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Education

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

This program will explore cultural intelligence frameworks, including one developed at a U.S.-based school of pharmacy, and their application to pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences educational institutions. Session speakers will discuss three unique approaches to addressing cultural intelligence frameworks taken by three international schools of pharmacy. Faculty and professional services staff participants will discover common barriers and facilitators to top-down and bottom-up interventions. Finally, participants will discuss methods to overcome challenges specific to their institution.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Articulate domains and function of cultural intelligence frameworks.
  2. Identify barriers and facilitators to applications of cultural intelligence frameworks in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences educational institutions.
  3. Discuss mechanisms to mitigate challenges and promote successful cultural intelligence interventions in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences educational institutions.

0581-0000-22-111-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator) Caroline W. Sasser, Pharm.D., PharmAlliance Program Coordinator, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Monash University Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, UCL School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Carla Y. White, B.S.Pharm., R.Ph., Associate Dean, Organizational Diversity and Inclusion, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Louise A. Brown, BSc (Hons) MRPharmS PGDip in Clinical Pharmacy, PGDip in Clinical Education, Professor in Pharmacy Education, University College London School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Amanda Storyward, M.P.A., Program Manager for Organizational Diversity and Inclusion, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Lauren May, Senior Research Fellow, Monash University Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

1:15 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

On the Basis of Gender? Understanding the Influence of Gender on Student Evaluations of Teaching

Texas 4, 5, 6

Student evaluations of teaching (SET) are traditionally used to evaluate faculty but a number of previous studies have found SET gender disparities. Do these trends hold true for pharmacy education? Come learn about the results from a multi-center project through the AACP Assessment SIG that examined the influence of gender on SET at 7 pharmacy schools. Options for ensuring equitable evaluation of faculty, regardless of gender, will be discussed.

(Speaker) Catherine Cone, Pharm.D., Associate Dean for Assessment, Touro University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Laura M. Fox, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutics, Presbyterian College; (Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Sullivan University

2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Oh the Places You’ll Go: Cultivating Personalized Health System IPPEs for Students With Work Experience

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Feedback from students who have work experience as a hospital intern has shown the traditional IPPE Health System experience provides little education beyond what is encountered in a student’s job. This coupled with the decline in availability due to the pandemic led two schools to develop alternate experience options for the IPPE Health System rotation for these students. The development process and data from the initial years of implementation will be presented for each school.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify if a need exists for an alternate IPPE Health System experience at the participants home institution using presenters’ approaches and processes.
  2. Outline a proposal for an alternate IPPE Health System rotation for students with work experience at the participants home institution.

0581-0000-22-112-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Maryann Z. Skrabal, Pharm.D., CDCES, Professor of Pharmacy Practice & Director of Experiential Education, Creighton University; (Speaker) Alison M. Stevens, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Dir. Experiential Education/Associate Professor, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis

2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Scaffolding Clinical Reasoning: Development and Implementation of a Clinical Reasoning Scaffolding Tool

Grapevine B

Clinical reasoning is a complex skillset critical for effective and safe pharmacy practice and a specific key assessment element per ACPE Standards 2016 as pharmacists utilize these skills across the spectrum of patient care. Best practices for teaching clinical reasoning, however, are lacking. Scaffolding is commonly used to incrementally advance students toward higher understanding and independence and can be used to teach clinical reasoning within the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe clinical reasoning in the context of Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process and understand how scaffolding assists in the educational approach.
  2. Discuss the application of a medication-centric clinical reasoning scaffolding tool across the curriculum.

0581-0000-22-113-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Nicholas R. Nelson, Pharm.D., BCPS, PGY2 Critical Care Pharmacy Resident, University of Michigan Health; (Speaker) Denise H. Rhoney, Pharm.D., Ron and Nancy McFarlane Distinguished Professor, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

2:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

CAPE Outcomes and EPA Revisions: Academic Affairs Committee Report

Texas Ballroom

The 2021–22 AACP Academic Affairs Committee will describe and discuss revisions to the CAPE outcomes and EPAs. Their work has been based on feedback from the Academy and other stakeholders. Also, ideas related to the implementation of the CAPE outcomes and EPAs across the Academy will be sought and shared.

(Moderator) Kelly Ragucci, Pharm.D., Vice President of Professional Development, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, Ed.D., Associate Dean/Professor, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Scott Stolte, Pharm.D., Dean, Nesbitt School of Pharmacy, Wilkes University

2:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

A Positive Side to the Pandemic: Collaborating With Partners to Pivot to Virtual IPE Experiences

Grapevine B

Delivering meaningful interprofessional education opportunities was challenging for pharmacy schools even before the global pandemic; COVID-19 only added obstacles to this goal. In this session participants will learn from University of Illinois Chicago’s (UIC) experience pivoting a local, in-person, third year (P3) IPE program to a state-wide initiative. Collaboration with multiple university campuses and other institutions in Illinois allowed students to learn about, from, and with more professions including students from rural and urban campuses.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the IPEC core competencies and how interprofessional education (IPE) fits into ACPE accreditation standards.
  2. Discuss lessons learned from a peer institution on pivoting from in person to virtual IPE experiences for their pharmacy students.

0581-0000-22-114-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Kevin O. Rynn, Pharm.D., FCCP, DABAT, Clinical Professor and Vice Dean, University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Marianne Pop, Pharm.D, M.P.H., BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) College of Pharmacy

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

A Plague On All Our Houses: What Do We Do About Academic Dishonesty?

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

In this session, participants will engage in dialogue and reflect on issues related to academic dishonesty within professional education. Participants will explore the motivations behind why some students choose to cheat and what impact this may have on their future practice. Speakers will share perspectives on this issue from the USA, Australia, and the UK. Through structured discussion and action planning, participants will share and explore new approaches and strategies to implement in their institutions.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Define academic dishonesty.
  2. Explore student motivations for cheating.
  3. Examine a wide breadth of strategies used by other institutions to reduce breaches of academic integrity.
  4. Develop new approaches to improving the academic integrity of their students at their institution.

0581-0000-22-115-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Amanda C. Savage, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Vivienne Mak, Ph.D., Director, Health & Clinical Programs, Keypath Education; (Speaker) Louise A. Brown, BSc (Hons) MRPharmS PGDip in Clinical Pharmacy, PGDip in Clinical Education, Professor in Pharmacy Education, University College London School of Pharmacy

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Are You Affective? Cutting Edge Practices to Assess Student Affective Domain Growth

Texas 4, 5, 6

With the introduction of the affective domain into ACPE Standards (3&4), pharmacy programs must demonstrate student outcomes in these difficult to assess areas. Situational Judgement Tests (SJTs) are an objective and efficient tool used in other sectors to measure the affective domain. Pharmacy educators will leave this workshop-style session with knowledge of the Pharmacy Affective Domain-Situational Judgment Test (PAD-S), evidence for its validity, and other contemporary assessment practices to evaluate students in the affective domain.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Delineate the role of situational judgment tests (SJT) in assessing students in the affective domain.
  2. Describe the evidence-based process of developing, refining, and evaluating the Pharmacy Affective Domain-Situational Judgment Test (PAD-S).
  3. Characterize contemporary practices for comprehensive assessment of the affective domain, including potential roles for the PAD-S.

0581-0000-22-116-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Teresa DeLellis, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP, Associate Professor, Manchester University; (Speaker) Jaime Maerten-Rivera, Ph.D., Director of Assessment, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Aleda M. Chen, Pharm.D., Ph.D., FAPhA, Associate Dean, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Cedarville University; (Speaker) Sharon K. Park, Pharm.D., M.Ed., BCPS, Associate Professor and Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs, Notre Dame of Maryland University School of Pharmacy

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Entrusting in Simulation to Meet EPAs

Austin 5, 6, 7

Addressing Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) in the didactic curriculum can be challenging. This session will demonstrate how simulation provides a diverse and adaptable setting for students to practice individual focused skills, sequentially develop progressively linked skills and be assessed for various EPAs prior to progression to APPEs. Panelists will share specific simulation activities that have been developed to better prepare pharmacy students to perform in these areas in practice.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the core elements of a simulation activity.
  2. Compare the different levels of simulation fidelity and modality to provide adaptability in supporting EPA development and assessment in a broad range of learner levels.
  3. Apply solutions using simulation for key challenges in EPA development and assessment.

0581-0000-22-117-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Jennifer Beall, Pharm.D., CHSE, Director, Pharmacy Labs and Simulation, Samford University; (Speaker) Leslie Andrews, Pharm.D., BCCCP, BCPS, CHSE, Clinical Professor, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; (Speaker) Erini S. Serag-Bolos, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, University of South Florida

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Gender Disparities in Pharmacy Academia: Turning Intent Into Outcomes

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Gender equality is an important topic in all areas of pharmacy including academia. The purpose of this program is to review current gender disparities in pharmacy academia and to discuss tools and actions to address them. The goal is for participants to leave the presentation with an understanding of gender disparities in pharmacy academia, a desire to take steps to address the disparities at their institutions, and tools and ideas to use as they start.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the gender disparity landscape in pharmacy academia.
  2. Identify disparities that occur at individual institutions.
  3. Select strategies to employ to address gender disparities at individual institutions.

0581-0000-22-118-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Rucha Bond, Pharm.D., Associate Dean and Associate Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Moderator & Speaker) Dana Hammer, R.Ph., M.S., Ph.D., FNAP, Senior Instructor, and Faculty Lead for Student Professional Development, Experiential Programs, University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; (Moderator & Speaker) Emily Dornblaser, Pharm.D., M.S., Director, Interprofessional Education Associate Professor, University of New England; (Moderator & Speaker) J. Andrew Orr-Skirvin, Pharm.D., BCOP, Clinical Professor & Chair Pharmacy & Health-System Sciences, Bouve College of Health Sciences School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

One Size Does Not Fit All: Communication Models for Promoting Public Health

Grapevine C

“Healthy People 2030” initiative addresses health equity on the macro and micro levels. Effective communication is a critical for promoting public health. On the macro level, using effective models is essential for enhancing population health and wellbeing.. On the micro level, effective communication empowers patients to participate as partners in their care and enhance their outcomes. The panel will highlight health communication models and the participants will design plans to integrate them in their curricula.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify five theories and health communication models that can be used to facilitate the patient-provider health communication process.
  2. Describe opportunities for health communication strategies to enhance diversity, equity, inclusion, and anti-racism in healthcare.
  3. Integrate health communication models into pharmacy curricula through innovative mechanisms.

0581-0000-22-119-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Chair & Speaker) Abby A. Kahaleh, Ph.D., M.S., BPharm, M.P.H., FAACP, Tenured Associate Professor of Clinical & Administrative Sciences & Board of Trustees Faculty, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Sharon E. Connor, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Jennifer Ko, Pharm.D., Assistant Clinical Professor, Marshal B. Ketchum University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Miranda Steinkopf, Pharm.D., Academic Leadership and Education Fellow, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Should They Stay or Should They Go? Addressing Well-being and Substance Use in Student Pharmacists

Dallas 5, 6, 7

The rigors of a doctor of pharmacy program can come at a high cost, financially, professionally, and personally. One area of concern as it pertains to well-being for Pharm.D. programs is substance use and its impact on a student’s professional trajectory. This session will describe how multiple Pharm.D. programs approach substance use situations, drug testing, and the support provided for students with substance use concerns.

(Speaker) Jaclyn Boyle, Pharm.D., M.S., M.B.A., BCACP, Assistant Dean of Student Success, Northeast Ohio Medical University; (Speaker) Dale English II, R.Ph., B.S.Pharm., Pharm.D., FASHP, Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Sullivan University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) Brooke Buffat, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Director of Continuing Education, Clinical Associate Professor, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Nicole Keenan, M.A., Director of Student Success and Career Development, University of Kentucky

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Square Pegs in Round Holes: Overcoming Barriers to Promotion and Tenure for Experiential Education Faculty

Grapevine D

The promotion and tenure process can be challenging, especially for experiential education faculty whose job duties may not be well accounted for in the promotion and tenure guidelines. Using data collected from interviews with experiential education faculty who have been successful with the process, this interactive session aims to provide experiential and other program directors guidance on how to modify previously published tips on promotion and tenure to make them more applicable to all faculty.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how Promotion and Tenure tips may need to be re-framed for successful promotion and tenure of Experiential Education Faculty.
  2. Discuss strategies for describing and documenting Experiential Education Faculty workload and responsibilities in a promotion and tenure dossier.
  3. Develop a customized short-term individual action plan for promotion and tenure.

0581-0000-22-120-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Lisa Richter, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP, FASHP, Director of Experiential Outreach & Assessment/Assistant Professor of Practice, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Kate Newman, Pharm.D., Director of Experiential Education and Clinical Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Jennifer Danielson, Pharm.D., M.B.A., CDECS, Assistant Dean and Associate Professor, University of Washington; (Speaker) Lisa M. Meny, Pharm.D., Professor, Accreditation and Assessment Coordinator, Ferris State University

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Two Parts Pedagogy, One Part Implementation Science: A Recipe for Assuring Patient Care Process Competency

Texas 1, 2, 3

The profession of pharmacy is seeking the right recipe for achieving a consistent approach to delivery of the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process and demonstrating its value. Consistency in practice begins in pharmacy school and the Academy. Implementation science, the study of methods that influence the integration of evidence-based interventions into practice, provides rigorous and reproducible tools and techniques for pharmacy education and practice.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe implementation science and its relevance to teaching and assessing the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process.
  2. Provide examples of how implementation science has been or could be applied to teaching and assessing the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process.
  3. Identify opportunities to incorporate implementation science resources and tools to teaching and assessing the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process at one’s institution.

0581-0000-22-121-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jennifer Bacci, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor, University of Washington School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Todd D. Sorensen, Pharm.D., Professor, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Keri D. Hager, Pharm.D., BCACP, Co-Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs and Associate Professor, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Catherine Cone, Pharm.D., Associate Dean for Assessment, Touro University College of Pharmacy

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

AJPE Reviewer Mentorship Program (RMP) Informational Session

Dallas 1, 2, 3

Come and learn about the new AJPE Reviewer Mentorship Program (RMP). The RMP is a free, year-long mentorship program, designed to provide an interactive “hands on” approach to manuscript reviewer training. Attendees will hear about all aspects of the program, including the benefits of the program, mentor/mentee format, program expectations, and plan of study. The session is open to all AACP members interested in joining the RMP.

(Moderator) Jonathan Thigpen, Pharm.D., Assistant Dean for Curricular Innovation and Professional Development, Samford University; (Moderator) Surajit Dey, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Roseman University of Health Sciences

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Seeding Curricular Change through Grassroots-Level “Curricular Conversations”

Grapevine B

Curricular change is often created through “top-down” or committee directives that may be met with resistance. In this session, we describe a grassroots approach to quality improvement that is initiated and supported through open and voluntary faculty participation in sets of “Curricular Conversations.” These have been conducted for various areas (e.g., teaching clinical reasoning), but each follows a similar process for identifying hosts, designing the sessions, deriving participants’ recommendations and ensuring administrative follow up.

(Speaker) Kristin Janke, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Assessment and Quality, and Professor, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Jean Y. Moon, Pharm.D, BCACP, Associate Professor, University of Minnesota

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

COD Networking Session: Career Mentorship Models

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Career Mentorship Models: Join COD members for a discussion of mentorship models and ideas being utilized at the school, campus, and institutional level for pharmacy administrators, faculty, and staff.

(Moderator) Pamela C. Heaton, Ph.D., Dean, The University of Toledo; (Moderator) Wanda T. Maldonado, Pharm.D., Dean, University of Puerto Rico

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

COD Networking Session: Psychological Safety in Academic Pharmacy

Dallas 5, 6, 7

Psychological safety, the belief that one can speak up without risk of punishment or humiliation, has become a focal point in all work settings. Join COD members for a discussion of potential challenges and useful practices in nurturing environments of psychological safety at colleges and schools of pharmacy.

(Moderator) Toyin Tofade, M.S., Pharm.D., BCPS, CPCC, FFIP, President, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (ACPHS); (Moderator) W. Thomas Smith, Pharm.D., J.D., Dean, Manchester University

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

COD Networking Session: Collaboration with State Stakeholders

Austin 5, 6, 7

Collaboration with State Stakeholders: Join COD members for a discussion of collaborative relationships between colleges and schools of pharmacy, state boards of pharmacy, and state pharmacy organizations that are enhancing pharmacy practice and education in the Academy.

(Moderator) George E. MacKinnon III, Ph.D., M.S., R.Ph., Founding Dean, Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Moderator) Debra Parker, Pharm.D., Dean, The University of Findlay

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

AJPE Reviewer Mentorship Program Welcome

Dallas 1, 2, 3

By Invitation Only

This is a networking and informational session of the inaugural cohort of AJPE's Reviewer Mentorship Program (RMP). Attendees will meet their mentor/mentee partner, review program expectations, formulate a plan to ensure mentee completion of the program, learn from a panel of AJPE Editorial Board members, and participate in networking activities to begin developing a productive mentee/mentor relationship.

(Speaker) Jonathan Thigpen, Pharm.D., Assistant Dean for Curricular Innovation and Professional Development, Samford University; (Speaker) Surajit Dey, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Roseman University of Health Sciences

4:15 p.m.–4:45 p.m.

Beyond Biostats: Executing An Evidence-Based Medicine APPE Rotation

Grapevine B

Both the Center of Advancement of Pharmaceutical Education (CAPE) Outcomes and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) standards acknowledge literature evaluation skills are essential to the provision of optimal patient care. This session describes how a virtual EBM APPE was developed and implemented among multiple preceptors across several rotation regions. Instructional methods for practical application will be explained. Innovated assessment methods and lessons learned will be discussed for preceptors considering implementing a similar rotation.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the implementation of a multi-preceptor, multi-region, virtual Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE).
  2. Discuss innovative active learning activities and strategies for assessment that can be adapted to other virtual APPEs.

0581-0000-22-122-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Taylor D. Steuber, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Nathan A. Pinner, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Clinical Professor, Auburn University

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Engaging Students in Health Equity Promotion Through Photovoice

Grapevine C

Despite decades of Healthy People initiatives health disparities persist. Complex problems require systems-based approaches. Integrating the Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) is central to improving the health status of individuals and populations. Innovative strategies are needed to promote health equity. Moreover, schools/colleges of pharmacy must lead in creating DEIA professional development activities. In this session, pharmacy educators will apply photovoice as a tool to teach students about the SDOH and assess student structural competency.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are important for students to gain to be agents of change for health equity.
  2. Discuss photovoice as a teaching methodology to enhance student’s creative thinking and ability to envision systems change.
  3. Describe how schools/colleges of pharmacy can implement photovoice and assessments related to health equity to educate students on health disparities, diversity, culture, and inclusion.

0581-0000-22-123-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Nancy Borja-Hart, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Sally Haack, Professor, Drake University; (Speaker) Jeanine P. Abrons, Pharm.D., M.S., Clinical Associate Professor / Director International Student Pharmacist Activities / Co-Director UI Mobile Clinics, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Gina M. Prescott, Pharm.D., Clinical Associate Professor, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Lauren Jonkman, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Get Up and Out of the Classroom! Innovative Active Learning Strategies for Nonprescription Medications

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

This session will highlight innovative self-care teaching strategies from two schools of pharmacy that take students outside of the traditional classroom setting. Faculty from Binghamton University will describe their Vitamins and Dietary Supplements Fair, focused on developing skill in counseling on these products using both written and verbal communication. Faculty from Wingate University will describe how they utilize Flipgrid© as a platform to facilitate information sharing following a visit to the pharmacy self-care aisle.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Highlight the challenges of incorporating parts of CAPE 2013 Domain 3 into didactic courses.
  2. Describe strategies to incorporate patient and provider education as well as written and verbal communication into a group project involving dietary supplements.
  3. Discuss the successes and challenges of a simulated patient experience in the self-care aisle utilizing Flipgrid© as a platform for sharing information.

0581-0000-22-124-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Moderator) Melissa (Lisa) Dinkins, Pharm.D., BCACP, Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Wingate University; (Speaker) Sarah Lynch, Pharm.D., BCACP, Director of Skills Education/Clinical Assistant Professor, Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; (Speaker) Erin Pauling, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, Clinical Assistant Professor of Ambulatory Care, Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; (Speaker) Jennifer (Jenn) Wilson, Pharm.D., BCACP, Associate Professor and Department Chair, Wingate University; (Speaker) Rashi C. Waghel, Pharm.D., BCACP, Associate Professor, Wingate University

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Going Global, Staying Local: Diversifying Global Learning Opportunities Beyond Study Abroad

Texas 1, 2, 3

Not all students have the resources or interest to travel abroad for experiential learning. By creating global learning experiences at home, we can reach more students, while enhancing international partnerships. During this session, administrators and faculty will explore two tested options for engaging their students in global learning from their home universities. Participants will generate innovative approaches to enhance global learning without leaving campus. Perspectives will be given from multiple universities and countries.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe institutional goals for engaging students in global learning.
  2. Identify barriers in reaching your institutional goals for global engagement.
  3. Develop 2 ideas or strategies for creating global learning opportunities that do not require travel.

0581-0000-22-125-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Ian S. Haworth, Ph.D., Vice Chair and Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Terrence Graham, Ed.D., M.A., Chief International Officer, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Rory Kim, Pharm.D., MACM, BCACP, Assistant Professor, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Hyunah Kim, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University; (Speaker) Mayur Patel, M.Pharm, Ph. D., Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutics Institute of Pharmacy, Nirma University

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

How Might We Adapt? Supporting Faculty and Leadership Problem-Solving in Times of Uncertainty

Texas Ballroom

Feeling overwhelmed with problem-solving and decision-making in uncertain or turbulent times? Are you searching for a framework to help you or your leadership team generate innovative educational solutions with unexpected constraints? We invite you to this session about the design thinking approach, a process that can promote creative problem-solving. In this session, participants will learn how to use design thinking to develop inventive solutions for challenges such as curriculum design and supporting faculty and learners.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss barriers to problem-solving and decision-making strategies during uncertain or turbulent times.
  2. Describe the design thinking process and techniques to promote creative problem-solving.
  3. Apply the design thinking process to generate solutions to identified challenges.

0581-0000-22-126-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Curriculum Innovation and Assessment, High Point University School of Dental Medicine; (Speaker) Amy M. Pick, Pharm.D., M.S., BCOP, Assistant Dean for Experiential Education, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Do This, Not That: Converting Don’ts to Do’s for Educational Research

Grapevine A

Through the educational research literature, the Academy continues to better itself by learning how instructors innovate in their courses to improve student learning. Through alignment with Kirkpatrick’s levels of training evaluation, researchers can create stronger evidence of student learning when evaluating the effectiveness of these teaching innovations. This program will discuss strategies and best practices for strengthening educational research for authors and reviewers.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the use of Kirkpatrick’s taxonomy to identify means to ensure evidence-based measurements of learning.
  2. Define evidence-based assessment tools that measure student learning.
  3. Develop individualized evidence-based educational research projects with strong measures of learning and utilizing best educational research practices.

0581-0000-22-127-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Lauren Schlesselman, Pharm.D., M.A.Ed. Psych, Executive Director, Learning Initiatives & Program Assessment, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, Ed.D., Associate Dean/Professor, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Ashley Castleberry, Pharm.D., M.Ed., Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Adam Persky, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

5:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Pharmacy TEACHnicians: The Role of Pharmacy Technicians in Pharmacy Education

Grapevine B

One of the oft-forgotten professionals with expertise/knowledge/skillsets essential for pharmacy students to understand is the pharmacy technician. By strategically partnering students with technicians, students can benefit from a unique perspective from someone with medication-centric knowledge and gain better appreciation and understanding of the technician role. It is essential that students not only understand technicians’ value but also tap into their expertise. This session will demonstrate the benefits of involvement of pharmacy technicians in pharmacy education.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the benefits of establishing pharmacy technician-led educational opportunities for pharmacy learners.
  2. Consider opportunities for pharmacy technician-led education at your practice site or educational institution.

0581-0000-22-128-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Nicholas Cox, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor (Clinical), The University of Utah; (Speaker) Kyle Turner, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor (Clinical), The University of Utah

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

SIG Networking Sessions

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP President's VIP Reception (sponsored by Tabula Rasa)

Yellow Rose Ballroom

By Invitation Only

5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

ALFP Alumni Happy Hour

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

SIG Networking Sessions


Tuesday, July 26

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Center Pre-function

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Leadership Development SIG Meeting

Ft. Worth 3

By Invitation Only

7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Center Pre-function

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2022. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions and assist with the AACP meeting app.

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Microsession Theme: Curricular Innovations to Meet Current ACPE Standards

Grapevine C

8:00 a.m.–8:10 a.m.

A Multimodal Approach to Intentional Interprofessional Experiential Education

Intentional interprofessional experiential education is the deliberate effort by preceptors and practice sites to create and promote educational activities designed to achieve interprofessional educational competencies. This session will review the concept of intentional interprofessional experiential education (IEE) and its key attributes. An example will be provided on the creation and incorporation of intentional IEE at a community hospital utilizing three different modes of delivery, assessment of interprofessional educational competencies, and applicability to other experiential settings.

(Moderator) Sarah Shrader, Pharm.D., FCCP, Senior Director of Academic Programs and Professional Development, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Angela Shogbon Nwaesei, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, Mercer University College of Pharmacy

8:10 a.m.–8:20 a.m.

All for One and One for All: A Multi-Program Introductory Interprofessional Education Course

IPE events can be challenging to organize and plan with multiple programs involved and often may end up being isolated events within the curriculum or co-curriculum. This presentation will describe the benefits and barriers from the development of a uniform IPE course mapped to the IPEC competencies that involves five different health science programs.

(Speaker) Michelle D. Chaplin, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDCES, Assistant Dean of Pharmacy, Wingate University School of Pharmacy 

8:20 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

An Interprofessional Approach to Improving Pharmacy Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Social Determinants of Health

This presentation will describe the design, implementation and assessment of a large-scale virtual interprofessional forum involving fourteen health professions programs titled, “Confronting Social Determinants of Health: An Interprofessional Strategy.” This presentation will cover the basic framework of the interprofessional forum including logistics for how the forum was delivered to a cohort of over 1,000 students as well as student assessment data.

(Speaker) Nicholas M. Fusco, Pharm.D., Clinical Associate Professor and Vice-Chair for Education, Practice & Service, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

8:30 a.m.–8:40 a.m.

Digitizing and Synchronizing Faculty Activity Data Collection and Measurement

The presenter will discuss and display a tool for collecting and aggregating annual faculty activity related to scholarship and service. Using Qualtrics survey software and a non-expiring link, faculty can enter accomplishments at any time during the year. These data are automatically available in easy-to-read pre-designed reports which can be viewed online with a password.

(Speaker) Elizabeth Sheaffer, M.B.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean for Assessment & Accreditation, Samford University

8:40 a.m.–8:50 a.m.

Going (Almost) Gradeless: How Removing Grades Can Deepen Student Learning Experiences

Removing (most) grades from a course can motivate students to adopt a growth mindset, use creative thinking, and take risks in their learning. One school of pharmacy will describe their experience with using peer and faculty formative feedback along with purposefully minimizing the use of points to assess work and support student learning.

(Speaker) Jeanne E. Frenzel, Pharm.D., Ph.D., BCSCP, Professor, North Dakota State University

8:50 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Helping Student Pharmacists Build Their Brand

Due to the time needed to meet technical standards, an area not currently addressed in many curricula is “branding” yourself for employment. While not required, it is critical for success. For our graduates to become leaders in both conventional pharmacy practice and innovative career paths, we need to prepare them to develop a personal digital brand and provide positive social media training to position themselves ideally for the workforce in a challenging job market.

(Speaker) Justine S. Gortney, Pharm.D, BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, Wayne State University

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Have You Heard? Everything is Science!

Grapevine A

The increasing knowledge gap between scientists and non-scientists enhance the necessity for unique strategies to engage communities around science. This session will summarize a week-long, cost-neutral city-wide science festival called Everything is Science focused on engaging the community and improving science literacy. The goals of the session are to provide an overview of the festival and offer lessons for how to adopt this approach in other cities.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify a need for science outreach in their community.
  2. Outline a science engagement project in their community.

0581-0000-22-129-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Vincent J. Venditto, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Kristie Colón, B.A., Account Director, SimpsonScarborough

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Doing the Work: An Updated Examination of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Anti-Racism Efforts Throughout the Academy

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Diversity, equity, inclusion and anti-racism (DEIA) efforts continue to be a priority for AACP and its members, throughout the Academy. DEIA is centered in the 2021-2024 AACP Strategic Plan as Strategic Priority 3: Leading DEIA Efforts. AACP staff will share current DEIA initiatives. Then hear from members about a project on gender equity in social and administrative faculty; the recommendations and collaborative next steps from a 2020 invitational summit of pharmacy school CEO deans, faculty, staff, and diversity leaders on actions aimed at ensuring that DEI efforts are sustainable, authentic, effective, and impactful; and the results of an environmental scan, conducted by the COD Task Force on DEIA through structured conversations with AACP COD members, to determine DEIA related successes, challenges, needs and opportunities.

(Moderator and Speaker) Terri Smith Moore, Ph.D., M.B.A., R.Ph., CPH, Senior Director of Academic Services and Strategic Initiatives, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Miranda Steinkopf, Pharm.D., BCACP, Academic Leadership and Education Fellow, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Karen Nagel-Edwards, Ph.D., FAPhA, Associate Professor, Midwestern University; (Speaker) Michelle L. Blakely, Ph.D., M.Ed., NCC, Assistant Professor, University of Wyoming​; (Speaker) Adriane N. Irwin, Pharm.D., MS, Clinical Associate Professor, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Clara Okorie-Awé, Ph.D., Ed.D., Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, University of Illinois Chicago; (Speaker) Stephanie Y. Crawford, Ph.D., Executive Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs & Strategic Initiatives, University of Illinois Chicago; (Speaker) Jennifer Robinson, Pharm.D., Associate Dean, Professional Education and Professor, Washington State University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Bridging the Gap: Intentionally Connecting Skills Lab Courses, Experiential Learning and Pharmacy Practice

Grapevine B

Preparing students for practice is a complex interplay between didactic, laboratory and experiential activities. How can skills lab courses help ensure students are learning and growing in preparation of success on rotations? This session will provide an overview of instruments and activities that three institutions have created in order to longitudinally track student growth in certain skill sets, as well as track those same outcomes from the skills lab into the experiential setting.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the “bridge” relationship between skills lab courses and experiential learning.
  2. Explain the role of longitudinal skills evaluations and feedback in measuring student growth and preparedness for experiential learning.
  3. Describe experiences of three universities in developing and implementing longitudinal assessments and feedback mechanisms as a method to prepare students to complete entrustable professional activities.

0581-0000-22-130-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Brandon Nuziale, Pharm.D., BCACP, Director of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences, Associate Professor, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Sarah Lynch, Pharm.D., BCACP, Director of Skills Education/Clinical Assistant Professor, Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; (Speaker) Deanna Tran, Pharm.D., BCACP, Associate Professor, Co-Director of Pharmacy Practice Laboratories, University of Maryland

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Design Your Next Leadership-Based Program or Scholarly Initiative: A Leadership “Think Tank” and Networking Session

Texas 1, 2, 3

Attendees will leave this session with a specific plan for a novel, cross-institutional Collaborative Leadership Initiative Plan (CLIP) that is either curricular, co-curricular, or scholarly. Facilitated networking and Leadership Think Tanks will enable attendees to rapidly identify common interests related to Leadership Development and form cross-institutional collaborations. Faculty, administrators, and staff desiring to create a new leadership program at their institution, or produce collaborative scholarly deliverables based on existing leadership programs should attend this session.

(Speaker & Moderator) Julie Akers, Pharm.D., BCACP, Associate Dean of External Relations, Washington State University; (Speaker) Jennifer Campbell, Pharm.D., Associate Dean of Academic Programs, Manchester University; (Speaker) Seth Heldenbrand, Pharm.D., Associate Dean for Experiential Education and Associate Professor, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, Pharm.D., Ed.D.c., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Chicago State University; (Speaker) David Fuentes, Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, Ed.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, University of Portland

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

It Takes a Village: How 5 Programs and Preceptors Integrated EPAs into Community IPPEs

Dallas 5, 6, 7

Five schools from the Southeastern Pharmacy Experiential Education Consortium utilized a modified Delphi process to integrate Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) into Community Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) curricula. Community IPPE and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) preceptors participated in focus groups and surveys designed to solicit expert feedback to identify, categorize, and build consensus on IPPE-level tasks students should be expected to perform to ensure APPE readiness. This resulted in an EPA-based Community IPPE curricula.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify opportunities for integrating Entrustable Professional Activities into Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences to ensure Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience readiness.
  2. Describe how to utilize a modified Delphi process to solicit expert opinion from preceptors.
  3. Explain the benefits of working in a consortium to develop and adopt a unified IPPE curriculum.

0581-0000-22-132-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Lena McDowell, Pharm.D., Assistant Clinical Professor, Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences Coordinator, Auburn University Harrison College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Kay Brooks, BSPharm, M.Ed., NBC-HWC, Associate Director of Community IPPE, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Johnathan Hamrick, Clinical Assistant Professor, Director of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences, Mercer University; (Speaker) James Fetterman, Jr., Pharm.D., B.S.Pharm., Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Experiential Education Coordinator, South University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Mentoring Matters: The Whys and Hows of Improving our Mentorship Abilities

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Effective mentorship is a cornerstone of the education of graduate students and other trainees across the academy. Faculty rarely undergo formal mentorship training—instead these skills are left to self-development, typically relying heavily on personal experiences. This session is designed to provide expert content and an interactive opportunity to improve personal mentorship abilities and generate ideas for initiatives designed for programs that invest in the mentorship abilities of their faculty.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify opportunities to strengthen individual mentorship skills and methods.
  2. Discuss initiatives that programs can use to enhance mentorship among faculty to maximize trainee development, well-being, and success.
  3. Commit to applying at least one change in each attendee’s mentorship methods.

0581-0000-22-133-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour,

(Moderator) Douglas Thornton, Ph.D., Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor, University of Houston College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Silvia Rabionet, Ed.D., Associate Professor and Department Chair, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Kelly Diggs-Andrews, Ph.D., Consultant and Educator, Diggs-Andrews Consulting LLC, National Research Mentoring Network

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

No Woman Left Behind: Negotiating the Next Step in Your Career

Texas Ballroom

Am I doing enough to be promoted? Is my workload and compensation fair? How will an interruption affect my tenure bid? Do I have what it takes to be a leader? These questions and others are common for women faculty to ask themselves during their career. This session will highlight gender bias in the workplace, promotion/tenure concerns common to women faculty, and wage gap inequalities. Strategies to close these equality gaps will also be discussed.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain gender biases in the workplace and leadership roles through the lens of the “category expectancy violation theory” and formulate strategies to address this bias.
  2. Discuss the impact of medical leave, maternity leave, childcare, and flexible work schedules may have on the promotion and tenure of female faculty and develop strategies for overcoming these barriers.
  3. Identify disparities in salaries earned by women compared to their male counterparts in academia and the pharmacy profession and discuss strategies to address this wage gap.

0581-0000-22-134-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Moderator) Susan E. Smith, Pharm.D., BCCCP, BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Rebecca Sleeper, Pharm.D., FASCP, BCPS, Senior Associate Dean of Curricular Affairs, Assessment and Accreditation, and Professor, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Jerry H. Hodge School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Laura M. Borgelt, Pharm.D., M.B.A., Associate Vice Chancellor of Strategic Initiatives and Professor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus; (Speaker) Sarah Nisly, Pharm.D., M.Ed., BCPS, FCCP, Vice President, Outcomes and Clinical Impact, Wingate University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Teaching To, For, and With Multiple Generations

Texas 4, 5, 6

Generation Z is the newest generation to enter pharmacy practice and education resulting in five generations (Silent; Baby Boomers; Generation X; Millennial, and Generation Z) interacting regularly to care for older adults. Exploration of the generational similarities and differences to overcome gaps in shared experiences is warranted. Attendees will discuss practical solutions to develop tools and implement innovative strategies in educational settings to effectively communicate and teach to learners and patients spanning all generations.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss educational strategies to equip and empower students to work and communicate with members from other generations to provide healthcare.
  2. Explore resources for pharmacy educators of any generation to adapt skills to effectively work with learners, patients, and team members from other generations.
  3. Collaborate with fellow health providers to develop practical solutions to overcome generational divides for the care of older adults.

0581-0000-22-135-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator) Michael W. Nagy, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Ashley M. Campbell, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Clinical Professor, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Teresa DeLellis, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP, Associate Professor, Manchester University; (Speaker) Briana Williams, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor, University of the Incarnate Word

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 3

Grapevine D

The list of roundtable topics and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app.

(Moderator) Bernadette Brown, Pharm.D., Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University COPHS

8:45 a.m.–9:15 a.m.

A Novel Bridge Program That Includes Orientation, Learning Strategies, and First-year Coursework

Grapevine A

Bridge programs for students entering pharmacy programs often focus on topics related to pre-pharmacy basic sciences. This presentation discusses a bridge program that offers academic success strategies woven with P1 course work, in addition to basic orientation. It slows down the beginning of the semester so students can apply the learning strategies. This presentation is intended for administrators in academic or student affairs and faculty who are involved with early phases of the curriculum.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the components of a bridge program that incorporates orientation, academic preparedness, and pharmacy coursework.
  2. Summarize how first-year pharmacy courses can be used as a context to apply learning strategies.

0581-0000-22-136-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Adam C. Welch, Pharm.D., M.B.A., FAPhA, Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Michele Williams, M.A., Ph.D., Academic Success Specialist, East Tennessee State University

9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

AACP Headshot Café

Center Pre-function

Sponsored by Walgreen Co.

Enhance your AACP Connect, LinkedIn and other social media profiles! Visit the AACP Headshot Café, sponsored by Walgreen Co., for a headshot taken by expert photographers.

9:15 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Microsession Theme: Curricular Innovations to Meet Current ACPE Standards

9:15 a.m.–9:25 a.m.

Incorporation of Hazardous Drug Compounding and USP 800 Knowledge in the Pharmacy Curriculum

Grapevine C

There is a critical need to incorporate and assess compounding of hazardous drugs (USP 800) concepts and knowledge in the curriculum of the doctor of pharmacy programs. This allows the graduates to understand the risk of exposure to patients, healthcare workers, and their environment. This presentation will discuss the incorporation and assessment of hazardous compounding concepts in the pharmaceutical compounding curriculum and its bridge to pharmacy practice and the Pharmacist Patient Care Process.

(Speaker) Surajit Dey, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Roseman University of Health Sciences

9:25 a.m.–9:35 a.m.

Peer Feedback on Clinical Reasoning: Innovatively Teaching and Learning Clinical Reasoning Within the PPCP

Providing and receiving feedback is ubiquitous within pharmacy education and it is imperative for developing practice ready graduates especially related to the Pharmacists Patient Care Process (PPCP). This micro-session will describe an innovative way peer review was incorporated to engage learners in teaching clinical reasoning through the provision of quality feedback.

(Speaker) Nicholas R. Nelson, Pharm.D., BCPS, PGY2 Critical Care Pharmacy Resident, University of Michigan Health

9:35 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Storytelling: A Method to Cultivate Meaning and Frame Interprofessional Patient Safety Education

Storytelling invites listeners to create context and cultivating meaning, which can also promote empathic learning. This micro-session will describe how storytelling by a family member about a medication error was an impactful teaching strategy, also serving to create the framework for active learning in an interprofessional patient safety workshop for medical and pharmacy students.

(Speaker) Candice L. Garwood, Pharm.D., Clinical Professor, Wayne State University

9:45 a.m.–9:55 a.m.

The Kids Are Alright? Lessons in Trauma Informed Teaching

Students' learning has and will continue to be impacted by a distracting and troubled world. There are simple interventions, based on the ideas of trauma informed pedagogy, educators can make to their teaching to support students (and themselves) through traumatic times. By making these changes, educators can put value in compassion while still being an effective and pedagogically driven teacher.

(Speaker) Zachary T. Woods, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor-Practice, The Ohio State University

9:55 a.m.–10:05 a.m.

Translating Standards Into Culture: Development of a Co-curricular Program that Fits Your Institution

The ideal co-curricular framework is one that amply reflects an institution's educational culture. Molding co-curricular standards to program-specific outcomes ensures clear and consistent professional development expectations, which promotes student success. This session will provide a roadmap for how a program can leverage its available resources, educational outcomes (EOCs), vision, and mission to design, implement, and assess impactful co-curricular opportunities that fully accomplish the goals set forth by ACPE Standards 3 and 4.

(Speaker) Timothy K. Fincher, Ph.D., R.Ph., Assistant Professor, William Carey University

10:05 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Utilizing POEMs (Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters) to Enhance Literature Evaluation Skills Amongst Pharmacy Students

This program will describe a technique of utilizing an adaptation of POEMs (Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters) to enhance students' skills in literature evaluation and presentation. The program will highlight the activity, relevant rubrics, and techniques to enhance the activity to a debate-style POETRY jam.

(Speaker) Dustin Christensen-Grant, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor, Roseman University of Health Sciences

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Towards an Equitable Workload: Sharing Lessons Learned While Building a Faculty Work Activity Dashboard

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Building institutional structures which support equitable faculty workload in higher education is a complicated process. Numerous inequity patterns infiltrate our systems and often go unnoticed or unacknowledged. Using a model developed by the American Council on Education, our pharmacy practice department began to develop a dashboard of work activity to increase workload transparency. We will explore our lessons learned and support other faculty in guiding their institution on a pathway towards workload equity.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. List three reasons why faculty workloads become inequitable in higher education.
  2. Identify the six required conditions for an equitable faculty workload according to the American Council on Education.

0581-0000-22-137-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Charlotte Farris, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Unraveling the Mystery of Innovation: Intentionally Weaving Creative Problem-Solving Skills Through a Required Curriculum

Grapevine A

Utilizing a framework of evidence-based problem solving as the anchor, this session will illustrate how a program intentionally weaves innovation, creative thinking, entrepreneurship and analysis of current practice through a required curriculum to empower graduates to improve patient care. The “innovation curriculum” is a longitudinal, integrated, required component of the pharmacy program beginning in the first professional year and culminating in a real-world, practice-based experience.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how various activities designed to enhance innovation and entrepreneurship fit within evidence-based problem-solving framework.
  2. Identify specific areas for cultivating innovation in students through development of a curricular action plan.

0581-0000-22-138-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Kate Newman, Pharm.D., Director of Experiential Education and Clinical Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Tessa Keys, ImPaCT Coordinator, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Award for Excellence in Assessment

Grapevine D

The recipients of the 2022 Award for Excellence in Assessment will present their award-winning submission Accuracy and Usability of Redesigned Entrustable Professional Activity Assessments in Pharmacy Practice Experiences by Kathryn Fuller, PharmD, BCPS; Adam Persky, PhD, FACSM; Nicole Pinelli Reitter, PharmD, MS, FCCP at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

(Moderator) Jaime Maerten-Rivera, University at Buffalo; (Speakers) Kathryn Fuller, Adam Persky and Nicole Pinelli Reitter, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Artificial Intelligence: A Medicinal Chemist's User Guide

Dallas 5, 6, 7

Artificial intelligence (AI) is emerging as a transformative method in many fields. In medicinal chemistry, AI has the potential to revolutionize methods of drug discovery, drug delivery, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation. Attendees will be introduced to platforms that can be used for evaluation of chemical information using AI algorithms, including approaches to data preparation and evaluation.

(Chair & Moderator): Anand Sridhar, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, MCPHS University – Boston; (Speaker) Ian S. Haworth, Ph.D., Vice Chair and Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Ma'mon Hatmal, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Hashemite University, Jordan

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Calling All Villagers! How a Team-based and Data-driven Academic Early Warning System Should Work

Texas 4, 5, 6

Early warning needs a holistic, team-based approach drawing upon faculty, student services, and assessment professionals to create a formal network capable of designing individualized interventions. Traditional early warning metrics should be expanded from academic grades and thresholds to include non-academic information such as accountability and behavior-related flags. Four schools discuss how assessment professionals created monitoring systems, recognized data trends, refined formulas for identifying at-risk students, and overcame challenges of implementation.

(Moderator) Beth Janetski, Ph.D., M.F.A., Assistant Dean for Assessment and Academic Planning, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Mary Ray, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs/Associate Professor, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Beth Martin, Professor (CHS) and Assistant Dean for Assessment, Teaching & Learning, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Tim Stratton, Ph.D., R.Ph., FAPhA, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Lisa Lebovitz, J.D., M.S., Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs and Assessment, University of Maryland

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Let's Talk About Death

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Talking about death is often an off-limits topic in education. For schools that do cover it, death education is often limited to end-of-life pharmacotherapy. Through the pandemic, the fragility of life has come to the forefront as important for students to be prepared to address. In this session, faculty from two schools will discuss novel teaching tools available to engage students in compassionate conversations about death in the didactic, experiential, and interprofessional settings.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the importance of end-of-life teachings with a focus on compassionate communication and empathy building in healthcare education.
  2. Review different tools and activities to talk about end-of-life discussion in didactic, experiential and interprofessional settings.
  3. Design a take-home plan for an end-of-life conversation activity to implement at your institution.

0581-0000-22-139-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Rebecca J. Mahan, Pharm.D., BCGP, BCACP, FASCP, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center; (Speaker) Meredith L. Howard, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor and Chair, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Trista Bailey, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP, FASCP, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice- Geriatrics, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Jerry H Hodge School of Pharmacy

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Global Partnerships for Change—Foundational and Clinical Science Integration for Pharmacists’ Professional Identity Formation

Texas Ballroom

COVID-19 has surfaced global inequities in healthcare education. Pharmacies can serve as economic and healthcare growth engines but remain underutilized due to limitations to a fuller scope of practice. We will share our approach, assessment strategies, successes, and lessons learned in training faculty across international programs in Japan, India, Egypt, and Bangladesh and form strategies to integrate foundational and clinical sciences to effectuate meaningful change in pharmacy practice in these countries.

(Moderator & Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, Pharm.BS, M.S., Ph.D., FAPE, Assistant Dean for Accreditation and Program Development; Director, Institute of Teaching & Learning, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Mikiko Takeda, Pharm.D., M.S., PhC, Associate Professor, The University of New Mexico; (Speaker) Islam N. Mohamed, B.Pharm, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, California Northstate University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) David Fuentes, Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, Ed.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, University of Portland

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Strategies to Overcome Barriers of Student Research Training Programs

Texas 1, 2, 3

Creating and disseminating new knowledge are critical to advancing the pharmacy profession. Ideally, pharmacists begin learning fundamental research skills while enrolled in a pharmacy program. However, numerous barriers exist in operationalizing quality student research programs. This session will engage attendees in examining the barriers and strategies to overcome those barriers in the design/implementation of a research training program. Participants will take away ideas for designing a program or enhancing the quality of an existing program.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss common barriers in the design and implementation in student research training programs.
  2. Evaluate opportunities for improvement in implementing student research training programs.
  3. Develop actionable strategies to improve an existing student research training program or implement a new program.

0581-0000-22-141-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Kathryn Morbitzer, Pharm.D., M.S., Assistant Professor and Assistant Director - CIPhER, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Steven Walker, B.Pharm., Intern Programs Manager, Senior Lecturer, Monash University; (Speaker) Rebecca Lever, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology and Associate Director, UCL School of Pharmacy

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Time Flies: Be the Pilot and Take Control of It

Grapevine B

Academics’ days are full of a variety of tasks that are hard to prioritize effectively. Oftentimes, the urgent activities overtake the important, career-building activities and can contribute to stress, decreased satisfaction, and lack of wellness. Prioritizing tasks effectively and developing strategies to address common distractors can improve faculty productivity and wellness at work. The session will highlight time management matrices, discuss various strategies, and provide attendees dedicated time to focus on their productivity and efficiency.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify and discuss time management concerns in academia.
  2. Compare and apply two common time management matrices and strategies to enhance time management to improve productivity and efficiency.
  3. Evaluate responsibilities and select strategies to implement to improve time management.

0581-0000-22-142-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Andrea L. Porter, Pharm.D., Associate Professor (CHS), University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Daniel Kennedy, Ph.D., Chair and Professor of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, Western New England University; (Speaker) Rucha Bond, Pharm.D., Associate Dean and Associate Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Dean, College of Global Population Health, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis.

10:15 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Using Book Clubs to Start Crucial Conversations related to Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Anti-Racism

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Sharing of equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) initiatives within pharmacy education are needed to facilitate development of best practices for students, faculty and administrators. Book clubs allow for a holistic approach to increasing awareness of and stimulating conversations around structural racism. This session will explore the use of book clubs to introduce EDI initiatives and describe how faculty advisors empowered student leaders to initiate the activity within the co-curriculum while organizing parallel discussions with colleagues.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss how to implement a co-curricular approach to diversity, equity, inclusion, and anti-racism through a student organization-led book club.
  2. Summarize the application of Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning Experiences to a diversity book club.

0581-0000-22-143-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Rebecca Cope, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Long Island University; (Speaker) Suzanna Gim, B.A., Pharm.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor, Long Island University

10:15 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Using the Cetacean Model: Leveraging PODs to Develop and Maintain a Pharmacy Curriculum

Grapevine A

The development of ACPE standards-based curriculum is a process that can be hindered by individual interests, siloed faculty, and an overall resistance to change. We will discuss leveraging Pharmaceutical-content Organization Domains (PODs) as small, agile, cross-disciplinary groups focused on developing and maintaining a curriculum. In the hands-on portion of this session, we will demonstrate a POD-related activity: the collaborative unpacking of standards to contribute to the scope and sequence of a pharmacy curriculum.

(Speaker) Elizabeth H. Vigue, Ed.D., Assistant Director of the Office of Assessment & Coordinator of Curriculum and Assessment, Husson University School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Aaron M. Domina, Ph.D., Associate Professor & Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs, Husson University School of Pharmacy

10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Microsession Theme: Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Anti-Racism

10:30 a.m.–10:40 a.m.

Am I Overreacting? Unmasking Microaggressions in Pharmacy Education

Grapevine C

Have you ever received a comment and wondered if you are overreacting? Microaggressions are subtle forms of discrimination that are often encountered in everyday life. This presentation will examine what microaggressions look like in pharmacy education, including when and how to appropriately respond to them.

(Moderator) Tamara A. McCants, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, Howard University; (Speaker) Amy M. Pick, Pharm.D., M.S., BCOP, Assistant Dean for Experiential Education, University of Nebraska Medical Center

10:40 a.m.–10:50 a.m.

An IDEA to Support Student Belonging Through Faculty & Staff Development on DEI

Equity-mindedness and inclusive teaching aims to create a learning and campus environment where all students feel safe, supported, and encouraged to reach their learning potential regardless of cultural background or identity. This session describes the creation of the Inclusion, Diversity, Equity in Academics (IDEA) certificate training program designed for faculty and staff at a health science University across multiple disciplines on two campuses.

(Speaker) Sally A. Arif, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCP, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University

10:50 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Out in the Open: The Importance of LGBTQIA+ Representation on a College of Pharmacy Faculty

LGBTQ+ students, like patients, face many population specific challenges that can be difficult to navigate while going through a rigorous pharmacy school curriculum and may feel under represented and alone without visible role models in the faculty. This presentation will briefly describe some of those challenges and how having purposefully and openly out LGBTQ+ faculty representation can benefit students and the curriculum.

(Speaker) Shane Tolleson, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor; Director of Ambulatory Care APPEs, University of Houston

11:00 a.m.–11:10 a.m.

Promoting Engagement and Retention of Students Whose First or Best Language is Not English

The PEER-E2 program promotes engagement and retention of students whose first or best language is not English with opportunities for student leadership, specialized academic support, and support for language development and proficiency.

(Speaker) Michele Williams, M.A., Ph.D., Academic Success Specialist, East Tennessee State University

11:10 a.m.–11:20 a.m.

Promoting Science Identity and STEM Community in Underserved Students Through Inquiry-Team-based Pharmaceutical Science Laboratory Design

Science identity and STEM community are two primary predictors of retention in the sciences that are often challenged in underserved student populations, particularly those that face the additional barriers of identity threat in their pharmacy education. Through applying collaborative inquiry-team-based learning design in an advanced pharmaceutical sciences lab course, undergraduate bachelors of science in pharmaceutical science students have demonstrated more engagement in lab and closing racial and gender gaps in the Persistence in the Sciences (PITS) survey scores.

(Speaker) Nicholas L. Denton, Ph.D., Lecturer, The Ohio State University

11:20 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Starting Early—Creating a Sense of Belonging in Pre-Pharmacy Students

This micro-session will discuss practical strategies that create community among students exploring the profession of pharmacy. A pre-professional orientation course provides a perfect venue to launch activities that increase belongingness in the profession and negate microaggressions among peers. Small group, mentored, online forums are one example of a useful platform for open discourse on these topics.

(Speaker) Patricia L. Darbishire, Pharm.D., Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

A Novel Grading System that Reduces Faculty Grading Time and Boosts Student Responsibility

Grapevine A

Increasing student self-awareness and self-regulation of learning without increasing faculty grading workload or decreasing course quality can seem an impossible task. Specifications grading is a recognized assessment method that allows student autonomy in achievement goals and selection of learning activities to accomplish course learning outcomes. Faculty members will present their experiences (and tips!) with this novel grading system that reduces faculty and student stress. Ways to incorporate specifications grading in pharmacy education will be discussed.

(Speaker) Laura M. Fox, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutics, Presbyterian College; (Speaker) Mary Douglass Smith, Pharm.D., Director of Experiential Education, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Presbyterian College

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Rx for Success Faculty-Student Advising: A Win-Win for Students and Faculty

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Faculty-student advising fosters self-reflection and personal growth, and supports students in professional socialization. Advising sessions, however, add to faculty workload, can be inconsistent among faculty advisors, and require faculty development to learn how to triage students to resource needs. This session for faculty and administrators highlights an advising program that provides prompts with advising topics specific to each academic year ensuring, consistent advising, and referral to student affairs for students in academic or personal distress.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the utility of a systematic process to facilitate and track student advising.
  2. Demonstrate decreased faculty burden through a series of academic-year specific prompts and quick access to student affairs intervention.

0581-0000-22-144-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Shauna Buring, Pharm.D., Associate Dean and Clinical Associate Professor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Teresa Cavanaugh, Pharm.D., M.S., Assistant Dean & Clinical Associate Professor, University of Florida

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Say More About That: Experiential Education Advising To Enhance Student Satisfaction and Professionalism

Grapevine D

Experiential education programs are advocates for students and sites/preceptors simultaneously. Building professional relationships is critical for student success on rotation as they develop and refine career goals. An experiential education program will share how yearly one-to-one advising is an opportunity for advocacy, education, and support. Presenters will share data on student satisfaction outcomes after the first year of program implementation. Attendees will have the opportunity to develop relevant advising questions and practice intentional advising skills.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Outline intentional advising questions that are adaptable to student's academic year and career goals, justifying the rationale for one-to-one experiential advising sessions to students as it pertains to student satisfaction and curricular outcomes.
  2. Demonstrate advising skills through practical application of their unique intentional advising questions.

0581-0000-22-145-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Celia M. Dennison, M.Ed., Assistant Director of Experiential Education, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Elizabeth D. Weed, M.S.W., Pharm.D., BCPP, Assistant Professor, Director of Experiential Education, Medical University of South Carolina, College of Pharmacy

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Starting Strong! Pre-matriculation Programs, Summer Review, and Structured New Student Orientation During Post COVID Times

Grapevine B

The transition from undergraduate to graduate coursework can be difficult, particularly for those with lower levels of academic preparedness. The adoption of holistic admissions also necessitates adopting holistic support mechanisms. Pre-matriculation programs can focus on learning strategies, self-awareness, pre-requisite coursework review, and an introduction to concepts traditionally residing within the first year of the Pharm.D. program. This workshop will feature strategies utilized by three programs to ensure student readiness before the start of Pharm.D. education.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe current efforts among three pharmacy programs for utilizing pre-matriculation and orientation programming to ensure student readiness at the start of professional degree programs.
  2. Develop a list of strategies for promoting student readiness in both cognitive and affective domains.
  3. Discuss programmatic assessment strategies to evaluate effectiveness of pre-matriculation and orientation programming on student success, satisfaction, and retention.

0581-0000-22-146-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Amy Diepenbrock, Ph.D., Assistant Dean, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, Pharm.D., Ed.D.c., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Chicago State University; (Speaker) Rocke DeMark, Ed.D., Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Chapman University

11:00 a.m.–Noon

AACP Transformation Center: Connecting, Scaling, and Accelerating

Texas Ballroom

The AACP Transformation Center (ATC) team will provide insight into why the ATC was created, what they plan to accomplish, and the approach they are taking to do so. Examples of innovation and transformation that are already being tapped into will be highlighted, and key takeaways from the Bridging Pharmacy Education and Practice Summit will be discussed. Attendees will have the opportunity to share ideas about the ATC's future plans.

(Speaker) Melissa Murer Corrigan, R.Ph., CAE, FAPhA, FASHP, Executive Director, AACP Transformation Center, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Nidhi Gandhi, Pharm.D., B.S., Associate Director of Research Programs and Special Initiatives, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Miranda Steinkopf, Pharm.D., Academic Leadership and Education Fellow, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Who Has Rights? We Do! Teaching Students and Graduates to Advocate for their Employee Rights

Texas 4, 5, 6

It is time for us to get involved in improving the work life of learners/pharmacists and in engaging pharmacy employers in making the pharmacy workplace a positive experience for all. Through presentations of “The Pharmacist's Fundamental Responsibilities and Rights” and results of the APhA/NASPA National State-based Workplace Survey, we tap pharmacy educators and learners for a discussion on strategies useful to equip learners and pharmacists to advocate for rights needed to fulfill their responsibilities.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss three aspects of the “The Pharmacist's Fundamental Responsibilities and Rights” statements that are relevant to pharmacy education.
  2. Compare and contrast the how these statements interface with selected results from the 2021 APhA/NASPA State-Based National Survey.
  3. Develop strategies pharmacy educators can use to instruct students and graduates when advocating for their rights with employers while fulfilling their responsibilities.

0581-0000-22-147-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Caroline A. Gaither, M.S., Ph.D., FAPhA, Professor, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Nancy A. Alvarez, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Dean, Academic and Professional Affairs and Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, R. Ken Coit College of Pharmacy - Phoenix at UArizona; (Speaker) Ana C. Quiñones-Boex, Ph.D., FAPhA, Professor, Midwestern University College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove Campus (CPDG)

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Behind the Scenes: Designing Situational Judgment Tests to Teach and Assess Professional Skills

Dallas 5, 6, 7

Situational judgment tests (SJTs) assess how underlying knowledge and skills are expressed when making decisions about job-related scenarios. SJTs can be used for learning professional attitudes and predicting future job performance. The purpose of this session is to present best practices of development of SJTs in pharmacy education. Attendees will brainstorm example scenarios related to target attributes, establish an answer key and score a student response, and be introduced to psychometric analysis for SJTs.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe test specifications for an SJT (test purpose, audience, format, and attributes to assess).
  2. Establish an answer key for an SJT scenario and calculate a score for an example student response.
  3. List examples of measures used to determine reliability and validity of an SJT.

0581-0000-22-148-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Michelle Z. Farland, Pharm.D., CDCES, Clinical Professor and Division Head, University of Florida; (Speaker) Stuart T. Haines, Pharm.D., FCCP, FASHP, FAPhA, Director of the Division of Pharmacy Professional Development, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Brent N. Reed, Pharm.D., M.S., BCCP, Clinical Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jennifer D. Robinson, Pharm.D., Associate Dean for Professional Education and Professor, Washington State University

11:00 a.m.–Noon

A Sense Making E-Learning Approach to Teaching Motivational Interviewing

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

Describe why a sense making approach for motivational interviewing was developed and why an e-learning program was created. Compare and contrast incorporation of this particular program into three separate pharmacy school curricula. Discuss implementation strategies and strengths of such a program.

(Speaker) Bruce Berger, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, Auburn University; (Speaker) Walter Fitzgerald, M.S., J.D., Idaho State University; (Speaker) Takova Wallace-Gay, Pharm.D., University of Texas-Tyler; (Speaker) Teresa Roan, Pharm.D., University of Florida; (Speaker) Takova D. Wallace-Gay, Pharm.D., Clinical Associate Professor, University of Texas-Tyler

11:30 a.m.–Noon

“We Are All In This Together!” Supporting Student Success Through Experiential Accommodations

Grapevine D

This session will provide strategies and resources for colleges of pharmacy to support implementation of experiential accommodations at their institution. Topics will include the development of a departmental procedure, approaches for preceptor development, a discussion of college technical standards, and a review of accommodations that may be used in this setting. The session will highlight case studies which demonstrate the use of these strategies including areas of success and lessons learned.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe three approaches to support the implementation of experiential accommodations within a pharmacy curriculum.
  2. Discuss the impact of these approaches through the examination of two case studies.

0581-0000-22-149-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

Speaker) Janel P. Soucie, Pharm.D., Instructional Assistant Professor and Office of Experiential Programs Regional Coordinator, University of Florida; (Speaker) Kimberly Stultz, Pharm.D., Director of Experiential Programs and Instructional Assistant Professor, University of Florida

11:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Qualifying Exams in Ph.D. Training: What Are Current Practices, and Do They Meet Student Needs?

Grapevine A

This session will provide an overview of qualifying exams in Ph.D. training, discuss common practices for both written and oral qualifying exams and discuss how qualifying exams align with program competencies and career goals in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences. Participants will explore ways qualifying exams in pharmaceutical sciences Ph.D. programs can be better aligned with training goals and be made more student-centered across the Academy and at their own institutions.

(Speaker) Michael B. Jarstfer, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Graduate Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

11:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Tell Me About Healthcare Inequity, Without Telling me About Healthcare Inequity

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

For many, discussing social determents of health in the classroom can be an uncomfortable exercise or feel like a forced activity. This session proposes an accessible curricular design component that can be utilized to facilitate an understanding of health inequities while also encouraging thoughtful analysis of scientific literature. This process has been shown to decidedly impact students’ bias, allowing them to better understand the implications of health inequities and the immediate relevancy to pharmacy practice.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify a need for alternative approaches to engage students around healthcare equity.
  2. Outline a strategy to implement a similar longitudinal assignment in their course.

0581-0000-22-150-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Vincent J. Venditto, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Kristie Colón, B.A., Account Director, SimpsonScarborough

Noon.–1:30 p.m.

Open Hearing of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee

Ft. Worth 5, 6, 7

This session provides all meeting attendees the opportunity to hear the business coming before the Final Session of the House of Delegates. All attendees may comment on proposed policies, resolutions and other business.

(Chair) Laura H. Waite, Pharm.D., BCPS, CLS, BC-ADM, Assistant Dean of PCP Student Affairs and Admissions, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, University of the Sciences

11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Microsession Theme: Bridging Education to Best Practice

Grapevine C

11:45 a.m.–11:55 a.m.

Introducing Tough Talks in Interprofessional Education

At some point in their careers, healthcare professionals will encounter patients in tough life circumstances such as domestic abuse, human trafficking, substance abuse, or suicidal ideation that affect social determinants of health. Yet these often taboo topics are not discussed in professional programs. This session discusses ways to introduce tough topics such as these to interprofessional students, apply them to patient case scenarios, and share community resources to help them in their future practice.

(Moderator) Ashley S. Crumby, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Academic Affairs Coordinator & Instructional Assistant Professor, The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Angela Chu, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Director of Interprofessional Education - South Jordan Campus, Roseman University of Health Sciences

11:55 a.m.–12:05 p.m.

Is it Professionalism or Professional Identity?

The terms professionalism and professional identity have been erroneously used interchangeably. After this session, attendees will have a clear view of the differences between professionalism and professional identity.

(Speaker) Ebony I. Evans, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, Howard University College of Pharmacy

12:05 p.m.–12:15 p.m.

Let's Give Them Something to Talk About: Adding Relevance Into the Required Student Journal Club

The ability to accurately analyze a journal article and apply the findings into practice is an important learned skill for students. Yet the use of journal clubs on APPE rotations can often lack meaning for both students and preceptors. This session will explain how, by making the topic relevant to the practice site, student responsibility and collaboration can be promoted while also increasing student interest and preceptor involvement.

(Speaker) Elizabeth Monson, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, North Dakota State University

12:15 p.m.–12:25 p.m.

No Electronic Medical Record Access? No Problem! Re-“Scripting” Patient Data Collection Through Script Theory

Ensuring students practice the pharmacists’ patient care process in an environment that reflects actual clinical practice, especially when access to electronic health records is not available, is challenging. One avenue that provides the opportunity to build clinical reasoning skills through the patient care process without heavy reliance by the learner on electronic health record data is through the use of illness scripts. This presentation will describe script theory; define illness scripts and outline the role they play in fostering clinical reasoning; and model how the principles of script theory can be used to facilitate informed data collection when access to the electronic health record is not available to the student.

(Speaker) Emmeline Tran, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor, Medical University of South Carolina

12:25 p.m.–12:35 p.m.

Taking Naloxone Learning to the Pharmacy

How can we help students translate classroom learning into experiential settings? This program will describe the development and results of a didactic-experiential model for teaching students about opioid use disorder and naloxone counseling for patients and family members.

(Speaker) Lindsey Hohmann, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Auburn University

12:35 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

When Assessments Imitate Life: Novel Approaches to Authentic Assessment Creation

Authentic assessments typically are designed to emulate real-life situations learners might encounter on clinical experiences and eventually, in clinical practice. Oftentimes these cases are designed as “sterile” encounters that effectively assess a skill but lose the authenticity of a real-life scenario. In this session, attendees will discuss novel ways to author authentic assessment cases that emulate practice as it actually exists.

(Speaker) Sarah E. Raake, Pharm.D., M.S.Ed., BCACP, LDE, Director of Instructional Effectiveness, Sullivan University

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Microsession Theme: Experiential Opportunities that Work to Transform Practice

Grapevine C

1:00 p.m.–1:10 p.m.

Addiction Pains & Gains in Experiential Education

Every U.S. Surgeon General has always stated that the number one way to help any patient is to recommend and navigate smoking cessation, which, at the core, involves substance use disorder (addiction). Student pharmacists across the country are practically begging for more real, dynamic, and tangible experiences in helping patients with addiction, and experiential education rotation experiences have the opportunity to contribute to reducing the mortality of an American dying every 6 minutes from a drug overdose while meeting the demand of student pharmacists. This discussion will review the incredibly impactful efforts of student pharmacists during an interprofessional Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) rotation at a free patient clinic in the "Ground Zero" of the Opioid Crisis, West Virginia.

(Moderator) Bernadette Brown, Pharm.D., Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University COPHS; (Speaker) Mark Garofoli, Pharm.D., M.B.A., BCGP, CPE, CTTS, Clinical Assistant Professor, Exp Director, Clinical Pain/Addiction Pharmacist, & TEDx Talker, West Virginia University School of Pharmacy & WVU Medicine Center for Integrative Pain Management

1:10 p.m.–1:20 p.m.

Driving Innovation in the Experiential Curriculum: A Unique IPPE Transitions of Care Course

ACPE standards require that students complete 300 introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) hours, with at least 150 hours completed in the community and institutional health-system settings. The presenter will share how a unique longitudinal IPPE experience focused on transitions of care has been integrated into the curriculum to enhance student learning and prepare students for advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs).

(Speaker) Alison M. Stevens, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Dir. Experiential Education/Associate Professor, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis

1:20 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Eureka! Virtual Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience a Hidden Gem for Tele-education

Telehealth is transforming practice at an accelerated pace. The challenge in crowded curricula is finding capacity for robust education on telehealth principles and best practices to yield practice-ready graduates. Come discover how a virtual introductory pharmacy practice experience can be an innovative solution that also boosts student inclusivity, flexibility, and engagement.

(Speaker) Stacy Taylor, Pharm.D., M.H.A, BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, University of Kentucky

1:30 p.m.–1:40 p.m.

LEARNERS Precepting Model: 5 Practical Steps to Better Clinical Reasoning

This session will introduce attendees to a new precepting model LEARNERS to promote clinical reasoning during patient case presentations. This model is unique in that it applies the Paul and Elder Critical Thinking Framework to the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process, addresses some of the limitations other case presentation models have, and has distinct yet connected roles for learners and preceptors. Pilot data of preceptor’s perceptions will be shared with attendees.

(Speaker) Charlene Williams, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDCES, Director of Preceptor Development, Clinical Assistant Professor Division of Practice Advancement, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1:40 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Role-modelling Decision-making in Ambiguous Situations: How to Prepare Preceptors

The speaker will describe a 3-part preceptor development series that was developed to help preceptors role-model their decision-making for APPE students. The focus of the preceptor development series was based on data that pharmacy students are hesitant to make clinical decisions in ambiguous situations; students can learn this skill from seeing pharmacists make decisions in unclear situations. The focus of the session will be to discuss the sessions and responses from preceptors regarding successfully implementing strategies in practice.

(Speaker) Theresa Charrois, BScPharm, MSc, Ed.D., Clinical Professor, University of Alberta

1:50 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Unleashing the Power of Student Pharmacists at a Student-run Free Clinic

Student pharmacists are capable of developing, enhancing, and maintaining services in many settings and capacities. This presentation will briefly describe a successful pharmacy operation at a student run free clinic that serves an underserved population, and best practices for how to fully leverage pharmacy students in various roles while balancing efficient operations with a safe learning environment.

(Speaker) Alex J. Luli, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Clinical Professor, University of California, San Diego

1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Prospective Student Behavior Regarding Final Pharm.D. Program Selection Post-Application

Grapevine A

While significant attention has been given to improve methods of increasing general student interest in the field of pharmacy, less has been done to understand the motivations of future student pharmacists when choosing their Pharm.D. program after applying. We will explore the usual intentions prospective students demonstrate during this high-stakes decision making process. Attendees will leave this session with a broader perspective on how to differentiate their program by enhancing specific parts of marketing strategy.

(Speaker) Shane C. Pruitt, Ed.D., Recruitment Specialist, The University of Georgia

1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Shake, Shake, Shake It Off: Promoting Faculty Well-Being Through Recovery Experiences

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Coping with the everyday demands of academia can be a challenge for even the most experienced faculty member, but evidence suggests that four types of experiences are especially well-suited to help people recover from stress. In this interactive workshop, attendees will be introduced to the science of recovery experiences and will take a self-assessment of their recovery preferences. Attendees will then be encouraged to brainstorm approaches to well-being that account for their unique recovery profile.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the four main categories of recovery experiences.
  2. Select a personalized approach to stress recovery that integrates one's preferences and the science of recovery experiences

0581-0000-22-151-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Brent N. Reed, Pharm.D., M.S., BCCP, Clinical Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

AACP Practice Models Survey: Identifying Sources and Mechanisms of Payment

Ft. Worth 1, 2

Please join Dr. George MacKinnon (Medical College of Wisconsin) and Dr. John Gums (University of Florida) as they discuss the results of a beta survey that looks to assess current trends in pharmacy practice activities among U.S. Schools/Colleges of Pharmacy, including integration into value-based health systems and practice plans involving revenue payment models.

(Speaker) George E. MacKinnon, III, Ph.D., M.S., R.Ph., Founding Dean, Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) John Gums, Pharm.D., FCCP, Associate Dean for Clinical And Administrative Affairs; Professor, University of Florida

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

A Deeper Dive Into Diversity—Secondary Dimensions of Diversity and Professional Identity Formation

Texas 4, 5, 6

Professional identity builds upon attitudes and behaviors. However, the impact of diversity on professional identity remains unexplored. While age, ethnicity, race, gender, gender identity, and sexuality are integral personal identity traits, socioeconomic background, first-generation/non-traditional education, veteran status, values, and experiences comprise the “secondary” sociological dimension of diversity. We will examine the intersectionality of the secondary dimension of diversity with PIF, delineating strategies for their incorporation in Pharm.D. programs to augment organizational health.

(Speaker) Evan Williams, Pharm.D., M.B.A., BCPS, BCACP, Associate Professor, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) David Fuentes, Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, Ed.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, University of Portland School of Nursing; (Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, Pharm.BS, M.S., Ph.D., FAPE, Assistant Dean for Accreditation and Program Development; Director, Institute of Teaching & Learning, California Northstate University

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Don't Sink the (Scholar)ship: Experiential Practice as a Research Trove

Grapevine B

Scholarly activity is an important component of the academic triad, but is challenging for clinical faculty and faculty in experiential administration. Competing expectations, including teaching, practice, service, and/or administrative responsibilities may make building research programs daunting. This session explores opportunities for meaningful scholarly productivity and collaboration from the lens of experiential administrators and clinical faculty, including solutions on developing, maintaining, and growing a pipeline of practice- and experiential-based scholarship to discover a research trove.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe scholarly productivity strategies including research prioritization, workload management, planning, and collaboration.
  2. Formulate a personalized plan to enhance scholarly productivity.
  3. Identify experiential opportunities to support scholarly productivity and collaboration across multiple sites or institutions

0581-0000-22-152-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Meredith L. Howard, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor and Chair, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Alex N. Isaacs, Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Taylor D. Steuber, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Kristin M. Janzen, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Austin

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Making Sound Judgments: Incorporating Reliability and Validity Theory Into the OSCE Design and Revision Process

Texas 1, 2, 3

Many educators have limited exposure to reliability and validity theory or how to incorporate it within assessment design. Further, much of the literature focuses on standardized tests rather than locally-developed performance assessments. Widespread use of OSCEs to inform decisions, including progressions, makes the need to ensure assessment quality all the more pressing. This session will present relevant theory followed by strategies, along with examples, for incorporating reliability and validity principles into the design of OSCEs.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the basic principles of reliability and validity theory.
  2. Discuss strategies for application of reliability and validity theory in performance assessments such as OSCEs.
  3. Develop a plan for gathering and analyzing reliability and validity evidence for a performance assessment at the participant’s institution

0581-0000-22-153-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Mike Rudolph, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs, Lincoln Memorial University School of Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Jill M. Augustine, Ph.D., Pharm.D., M.P.H., Director of Assessment and Assistant Professor, Mercer University; (Speaker) Justine S. Gortney, Pharm.D, BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, Wayne State University

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Learning vs. Performance: A Balancing Act

Dallas 5, 6, 7

Learning needs and performance expectations are at odds in educational settings. For learning, failure is expected. For performance, failure should be minimized. Studies support the use of retrieval practice to improve learning durability. However, faculty commonly think that retrieval practice activities should be graded to incentivize students to participate. This session will explore the balance of learning and performance activities in courses and persuade faculty to re-envision the balance of these activities in their courses.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Differentiate learning and performance.
  2. Identify elements of performance activities that contribute to academic dishonesty.
  3. Assess learning activities to identify those that should contribute to a course grade

0581-0000-22-154-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Michelle Z. Farland, Pharm.D., CDCES, Clinical Professor and Division Head, University of Florida; (Speaker) Lindsey M. Childs-Kean, Pharm.D., M.P.H., BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, Pharm.D., BCPS, Professor and Vice Chair, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Sarah Eudaley, Pharm.D., BCPS, Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Translational Science, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, College of Pharmacy

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Preparing Students for Success: Strategies to Train Students for the Post-Graduate Job Market

Grapevine D

Pharmacy and pharmaceutical scientist professions are experiencing unprecedented change amidst an evolving healthcare landscape. Numerous calls have emerged for reform in health professions education and highlight ongoing concerns about the ability of programs to successfully prepare students for post-graduate positions. This has placed an emphasis on pharmacy schools implementing strategies to help position students for job market success after graduation. This session will describe approaches that one institution took in Pharm.D. and Ph.D. career services.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the current state of the job market for Pharm.D. and Ph.D. graduates.
  2. Evaluate opportunities for improvement in curricular development and career services programs.
  3. Identify curricular and career services strategies to prepare students for success in the job market after graduation

0581-0000-22-155-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Kathryn Morbitzer, Pharm.D., M.S., Assistant Professor and Assistant Director - CIPhER, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Dean, College of Global Population Health, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louisdav; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Lana Minshew, Ph.D., M.Ed., Assistant Professor and Co-Director Human-Centered Design Lab, Medical College of Wisconsin.

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Pharmacogenomics Case-based Education: One Size Does Not Fit All. Incorporating Diversity-and-Inclusion Principles in Case Development

Texas Ballroom

This session presents two approaches that incorporates diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) principles in pharmacogenomics education: [1] Diverse standardized pharmacogenomics patient cases repository created by the Pharmacogenomics SIG and rationale for population specific genetic markers in case development. [2] A descriptive overview, including a brief simulated demonstration of a classroom debate using a “thinking-hat approach” to help students reflect on challenges such as race as a social construct versus a biological one within Personalized Medicine.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the rationale for updating and evaluating the case repository to better reflect biogeographic diversity and inclusion of populations within identified therapeutic areas.
  2. Identify three therapeutic areas within pharmacogenomics for future case updates that consider diversity and inclusion principles.
  3. Describe how standardized patient cases and the use of classroom debates, using the thinking-hat approach, can address diversity, equity and inclusion in pharmacogenomics

0581-0000-22-156-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Chair & Moderator) Otito F. Iwuchukwu, RPh, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Fairleigh Dickinson University; (Speaker) Marina Galvez Peralta, Pharm.D., Ph.D., FCP, Teaching Associate Professor and Director of the Division of Teaching, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Diane Calinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Vice Chair of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manchester University; (Speaker) Cheryl D. Cropp, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Samford University; (Speaker) Rustin D. Crutchley, Pharm.D., AAHIVP, Associate Professor, Washington State University

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Striking the Balance Between Student Boredom and Breakdown: Optimizing Performance-Based Activities and Assessments

Austin 5, 6, 7

Stress is often associated with the negative. However, some stress can be beneficial to achieve peak performance. Presenters will discuss strategies to balance student stress associated with performance and assessment in skills laboratories. Impacts of alternative activities, grading schemas, and assessment techniques on students and faculty will be presented. Attendees will have the opportunity to assess their courses to identify areas that may be stressful and brainstorm possible solutions to improve student and faculty wellbeing.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify contributors to student stress when completing performance-based activities and assessments.
  2. Describe methods used to reduce student stress related to performance-based activities and assessments and the benefits provided to students and faculty.
  3. Determine one activity or assessment that could be changed to balance student stress

0581-0000-22-170-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Andrea L. Porter, Pharm.D., Associate Professor (CHS), University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Jeanne E. Frenzel, Pharm.D., Ph.D., BCSCP, Professor, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Kali M. VanLangen, Pharm.D., BCPS, Professor, Pharmacy Practice, Ferris State University

1:45 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

The Human Connection: Helping Students Avoid Loneliness and Social Isolation

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Feelings of loneliness have become commonplace in today's world, especially this past year which was exacerbated by the lack of interaction with others. Human beings are made for connection! This session is designed to equip faculty with the ability to recognize students who seem disengaged and how to encourage them to get involved. With guidance from the presenters, attendees will participate in small and large group discussions to share, plan, and develop their own initiatives.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe strategies for recognizing students who are experiencing loneliness and social isolation.
  2. Identify at least one activity that can be used to help these students experience the healing power of human connection

0581-0000-22-157-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Stacey D. Curtis, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Jeff Cain, Ed.D., M.S., Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science, University of Kentucky

1:45 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Caterpillar to Butterfly: Professional Identity Formation for Metamorphosis of Student to Pharmacist

Grapevine A

A purposeful, planned approach to professional identity formation (PIF) can foster transformation from students with an undergraduate mindset to individuals entering the pharmacy profession who think, act, and feel like pharmacists. This session will describe our program’s intentional approach to PIF from first year orientation to commencement, including descriptions of curricular, co-curricular, and social learning. In addition, strategies to inculcate professional norms and expectations of a pharmacist along with methods assessing PIF will be shared.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the rationale for intentional incorporation of professional identity formation in pharmacy education.
  2. Describe how to support and assess professional identity formation in pharmacy students

0581-0000-22-158-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Shauna Buring, Pharm.D., Associate Dean and Clinical Associate Professor, University of Florida; (Speaker) Priti Patel, Pharm.D., Director of Personal and Professional Development, University of Florida

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

The PRISMA 2020 Statement: A New Roadmap for Reporting Systematic Reviews

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Conducting a systematic review requires a rigorous methodological approach. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement provides guidance for researchers to accurately report their methodology and findings. This session will summarize and highlight changes in the new 2020 PRISMA statement from the 2009 statement. Participants will learn what is new and noteworthy and utilize and incorporate these changes to improve quality and reporting practices and of their systematic reviews.

(Speaker) Jennifer R. Martin, M.A., Librarian & Clinical Instructor, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Rebecca Carlson, M.L.S., AHIP, Health Sciences Librarian and Liaison to the Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

House of Cards: Stacking Up Learners for a Royal Flush of Research Success

Grapevine A

Do you have too many trainees reaching out for research and not enough projects or bandwidth? Leverage learners in all different stages of training to build research prowess, near peer mentorship opportunities, and project management experience. This session will explore layered approaches for short term summer boot camps to longitudinal intensive research projects in both clinical and educational research. Participants will have opportunities to apply the content, creating an action plan for layered research mentorship.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify benefits and barriers to implementation of layered research mentorship.
  2. Outline an action plan to infuse layered research into existing or new research endeavors

0581-0000-22-159-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Alex N. Isaacs, Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Sarah Nisly, Pharm.D., M.Ed., BCPS, FCCP, Vice President, Outcomes and Clinical Impact, Wingate University

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Closing the Loop: Engaging Preceptors in Experiential CQI Through Design Thinking and Rapid Cycle Improvement

Grapevine B

Preceptors play a critical role in experiential learning. The importance of preceptor involvement in Pharm.D. experiential continuous quality improvement (CQI) is widely recognized. Design thinking can be applied to involve preceptors in experiential program implementation and improvement. This session describes using design thinking to engage preceptors in experiential CQI through focus groups, surveys, and idea generation workshops. Presenters will also discuss how to integrate preceptor feedback and share results of rapid cycle improvements to close the CQI loop.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Outline one design thinking-based approach to enhance preceptor engagement in experiential CQI.
  2. Propose one strategy for sharing experiential quality improvement outcomes with preceptors to close the CQI loop

0581-0000-22-160-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jennifer Chang, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Preceptor Development, University of Washington; (Speaker) Rachel A. Allen, Pharm.D., BCACP, Clinical Assistant Professor, Director, Bracken Pharmacy Learning Center, University of Washington

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Correct or Incorrect? OSCE Standard Setting and “Grading” Methodologies Utilized in Pharmacy Education

Austin 5, 6, 7

Pharmacy programs are using a variety of performance assessments to demonstrate student achievement and minimal competency. Performance assessments may include OSCEs, practicums, and presentations. Establishing a minimum passing score and grading of these assessments can be accomplished using a variety of methodologies. This session will outline different standard setting and grading options and how each could be used with these performance assessments.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Differentiate between the examinee-centered and test-centered standard settings in assessment grading.
  2. Review current performance assessment practices and develop quality improvement ideas for standard setting.
  3. Discuss best practices for standardized grading among a variety of raters

0581-0000-22-161-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Jill M. Augustine, Ph.D., Pharm.D., M.P.H., Director of Assessment and Assistant Professor, Mercer University; (Speaker) Justine S. Gortney, Pharm.D, BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Mike Rudolph, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs, Lincoln Memorial University School of Medical Sciences

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Empowering Pharm.D. Students to Become Life-Long Advocates for the Profession

Grapevine C

This program will review the critical importance of advocacy skills for the profession, report results of an AACP Public Health SIG survey regarding the current state of advocacy training in PharmD programs, and provide the audience with tools to implement advocacy programs at their institutions. The audience will draft potential policies, suggest educational outcomes or accreditation standards to promote student advocacy knowledge and skills, and discuss methods to incorporate advocacy education into Pharm.D. programs.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the critical importance of advocacy for the profession, identify gaps in the current system, and explore additional opportunities to incorporate advocacy into outcomes and accreditation standards.
  2. Discuss lessons learned regarding advocacy in Pharm.D. education by reviewing recent AACP Public Health SIG survey results about emergency preparedness and response (EPR) and advocacy in PharmD programs.
  3. Suggest ways to expand and sustain advocacy skills for Pharm.D. students through applying the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) model for lifelong learning based on the review of examples of advocacy programs in Pharm.D. education and advocacy initiatives in professional organizations

0581-0000-22-162-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Abby A. Kahaleh, Ph.D., M.S., B.Pharm., M.P.H., FAACP, Tenured Associate Professor of Clinical & Administrative Sciences & Board of Trustees Faculty, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) Peter M. Tenerelli, Pharm.B.S., Pharm.D., EMP, Assistant Professor of Social and Administrative Sciences, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Suzanne Clark, Pharm.B.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Hoai-An Truong, Pharm.D., M.P.H., FAPhA, FNAP, Professor, University of Maryland Eastern Shore; (Speaker) See-Won Seo, Pharm.D., BCACP, Associate Professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Examining Unconscious Bias Through the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Lens

Texas 4, 5, 6

Unconscious bias encompasses characteristics of race, gender, sexual orientation, physical appearance, age, financial status, disability, mental illness, and many other areas. It is vital for pharmacists to examine unconscious bias and help create an equitable environment in healthcare. This session will allow participants to explore their own unconscious biases in various settings and utilize the CPD approach to address an area of bias.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Define key terminology related to unconscious bias.
  2. Describe how bias impacts patient care and professional relationships.
  3. Utilize the CPD approach to examine and address an area of bias

0581-0000-22-163-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator) Dimitra Travlos, Pharm.D., FNAP, Assistant Executive Director and Director, Continuing Pharmacy Education Provider Accreditation, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; (Speaker) Melissa J. Durham, Pharm.D., MACM, APh, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy & Assistant Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, University of Southern California School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Eric Bailey, II, Ed.D., M.B.A., Director of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Tyler M. Kiles, Pharm.D., BC-ADM, Assistant Professor, Clinical Coordinator of PGY-1 Community-Based Pharmacy Residency Program, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Translational Science

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Hide and Seek—Revealing and Addressing the Hidden Curriculum in Pharmacy Education

Texas 1, 2, 3

As a student, have you ever been misled by an instructor to reconsider your future career direction? As a teacher, have you ever reflected on what you are teaching students or how you handle difficult students? Hidden curriculum can affect many aspects of our teaching and student learning. Based on a scoping review, this session will help define hidden curriculum, describe its potential effects in pharmacy education, and share strategies to address it.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Define hidden curriculum in pharmacy education, compared with other health professions.
  2. Describe how hidden curriculum may affect student learning and the transformation of pharmacy profession.
  3. Discuss strategies to address hidden curriculum in pharmacy education, especially in experiential learning

0581-0000-22-164-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Moderator & Speaker) Sharon K. Park, Pharm.D., M.Ed., BCPS, Associate Professor and Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs, Notre Dame of Maryland University School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Aleda Chen, Pharm.D., Ph.D., R.Ph., Associate Dean, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Cedarville University School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Laura Frankart, Pharm.D., M.Ed., BCPS, Director of Education and Assessment, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Srikanth Kolluru, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Assessment and Faculty Development, Professor, Keck Graduate Institute School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Influence of Population Genetics and Psychosocial Factors on Pharmacotherapy Case-Based Education. Where is the Meridian?

Dallas 5, 6, 7

The exclusion of race as a social factor in clinical and didactic case presentations is being advocated. There are, however, opportunities to apply concepts of biogeographical groupings based on genetic markers over-represented in certain populations and how these can influence patient outcomes in clinical practice. This session will present an argument for understanding [if and] when a focus on biogeographical groupings should be incorporated in clinical decision making and pharmacy case-based education.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the concept of biogeographical groupings as used in population genetics.
  2. Explain the differences between race as a social construct and biogeographical groupings as a proxy for race.
  3. Identify therapeutic areas for case-based education and practice where biogeographical groupings can be incorporated for clinically relevant patient outcomes

0581-0000-22-165-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Chair) Otito F. Iwuchukwu, RPh, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Fairleigh Dickinson University; (Moderator) Cheryl D. Cropp, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Samford University; (Speaker) Justina Lipscomb, Pharm.D.,BCPS, Clinical Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Rachel Huddart, Ph.D., Scientific Curator, PharmGKB; (Speaker) Earl Ettienne, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Programs, Howard University

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Pharmacy Workforce Center (PWC) Update

Grapevine 4, 5, 6

The Pharmacy Workforce Center's (PWC) mission is to serve the pharmacy profession and the public by actively researching, analyzing, and monitoring the size, demography, and activities of the pharmacy workforce. This session will offer insight into the current work of the PWC, the Pharmacy Demand Report (PDR), and other workforce-related issues.

(Speaker) Lynette Bradley-Baker, Ph.D., CAE, R.Ph., Senior Vice President of Public Affairs and Engagement, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, (Speaker) Thomas Maggio, MBA, Public Affairs and Engagement Manager, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

What IF? Using Accessible Technology to Create "Choose Your Own Adventure" Style Cases

Grapevine D

While new educational technologies can enhance student engagement, they can also strain time and financial resources. Accessible interactive fiction (IF) technologies, like Twine and Qualtrics, can be leveraged to create text-based adventure games, digital “Choose your own adventure” stories, which allow players to explore the outcome of a series of decisions. In this session, faculty participants will explore an IF framework for teaching clinical decision-making and will construct a decision tree and basic case.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how no-to-low code educational technology can be implemented in pharmacy curricula.
  2. Match course/session learning objectives with appropriate educational technology for teaching and assessing those skills.
  3. Design an outline for an interactive case in the software of their choice

0581-0000-22-166-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Moderator) Rahul Nohria, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice, West Coast University; (Speaker) Rory Kim, Pharm.D., MACM, BCACP, Assistant Professor, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Noam Morningstar-Kywi, Pharm.D., M.S., Educational Technology Software Developer, University of Southern California; PBPK Modeling Scientist, Simulations Plus, Inc; (Speaker) Paul Reynolds, Pharm.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Colorado

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Strengthening Communication Links Between Experiential and Student Affairs to Enhance Safety Nets for APPE Students

Grapevine B

Per ACPE standards, colleges/schools of pharmacy are required to provide academic and mental health support for students throughout the program. This task becomes difficult when students are on experiential rotations and no longer physically at the same location of faculty. This session will discuss how one institution utilizes an enhanced communication model that incorporates a partnership between student affairs and experiential offices to ensure students are provided effective support when on experiential rotations.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the areas in which experiential students need support.
  2. Discuss the partnership between student affairs and experiential education to provide student support

0581-0000-22-167-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Stacy Miller, Pharm.D., M.B.A., BCACP, Assistant Dean for Clinical Education, University of Florida; (Speaker) Teresa Cavanaugh, Pharm.D., M.S., Assistant Dean & Clinical Associate Professor, University of Florida

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Special Interest Group (SIG) Cabinet Meeting

Closed Meeting.

Ft. Worth 5, 6, 7

Closed meeting of the SIG Cabinet, consisting of the SIG Cabinet Administrative Board and individual SIG officers.

(Moderator & Speaker) Kerry K. Fierke, Ed.D., Chair, SIG Cabinet Administrative Board and Associate Professor, University of Minnesota; (Moderator) Candelaria Moralez, B.A., Manager of Governance Groups and Programs, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jordan R. Covvey, Ph.D., Chair-elect, SIG Cabinet Administrative Board and Associate Professor, Duquesne University; (Speaker) William A. Prescott, Jr., Pharm.D., Immediate Past Chair, SIG Cabinet Administrative Board and Clinical Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Teresa DeLellis, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP, Secretary of Knowledge Management, SIG Cabinet Administrative Board and Associate Professor, Manchester University

3:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Navigating the Expansion of Ambulatory Care Pharmacy in Unique Practice Settings With Third-Party Payer Collaboration

Grapevine A

As reimbursement models move to value-based care, interprofessional, team-based care is essential. In the ambulatory care setting, embedded pharmacist services are primarily limited to major health systems. Collaboration with local payers and other stakeholders is critical for expansion into novel settings. In this session, attendees will learn how one college of pharmacy leveraged local payers to embed a pharmacist in a private practice. Attendees will also learn of potential barriers and solutions for future collaborations.

(Speaker) Erin Gurney, Pharm.D., Clinical Innovations Fellow, The University of Utah; (Speaker) Nicholas Cox, Pharm.D., BCACP, Assistant Professor (Clinical), The University of Utah

3:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Fifty Shades of Gray: Assessing Clinical Reasoning in Ambiguity

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Pharmacy graduates must use clinical reasoning skills to make patient care decisions that often include ambiguity. Traditional assessment methods make inclusion of uncertainty difficult. A script concordance test (SCT) asks test takers to respond to case vignettes in a series of different contexts that fall into clinical gray areas. This session will provide faculty with a framework for the construction and administration of an SCT to assess reasoning skills in a variety of subject areas.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Characterize clinical reasoning skills and available tools used to assess these skills.
  2. Describe how faculty can construct and administer a script concordance test to assess clinical reasoning skills

0581-0000-22-168-L99-P, 0.50 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Knowledge-based

(Speaker) Lydia C. Newsom, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, Mercer University

4:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Alignment, Integration and Assessment of Multidimensional Co-Curricular Program

Grapevine A

The Co-Curricular Program provides opportunities for enriching pharmacy students’ learning experiences, enhancing their Professional Identify Formation (PIF) and maximizing attainment of several programmatic learning objectives. This session will discuss holistic approaches for the alignment, integration, assessment, and validation of Co-Curricular Programs. Speakers will describe the scaffolding of student experiences within the Co-Curricular Program at California Northstate University College of Pharmacy as a guide for engaging the audience in developing parallel experiences for their programs.

(Speaker) Islam N. Mohamed, B.Pharm, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, California Northstate University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Eugene M. Kreys, Pharm.D., BCPS, Ph.D., Director of Assessment, Assistant Professor, California Northstate University

4:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Global Partnerships to Advance Pharmacy Education: Targeted Preceptor Development Programs Emphasizing Clinical Pharmacy Practice

Grapevine 1, 2, 3

Preceptor development is a critical component of quality experiential education. In addition to preceptor development efforts in the U.S., there is a need to assist international institutions in meeting this goal to foster advancement of pharmacy education and practice. This session will describe ways to foster global partnerships to identify preceptor development needs of international pharmacy programs and explore strategies to create targeted preceptor development programs to help advance pharmacy education and clinical training internationally.

(Speaker) Angela Shogbon Nwaesei, Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Associate Professor, Mercer University College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Pamela Moye-Dickerson, Pharm.D., BCPS, AAHIVP, Clinical Associate Professor, Mercer University

4:00 p.m.–5:45 p.m.

Tuesday General Session: A Conversation on Transformation and Transitions

Texas Ballroom

Join Lucinda Maine and Lee Vermeulen for a conversation emphasizing both AACP’s rich history and its bright future. Moderated by Stuart Haines, 2021–22 AACP President, the panelists will share insights into the CEO transition at AACP and outline the exciting plans for the future, including the new Center to Accelerate Pharmacy Practice Transformation and Academic Innovation, the 2021–2024 AACP strategic plan, and new initiatives to better support members’ work toward the advancement of pharmacy and pharmacists.

(Moderator) Stuart Haines, Pharm.D., Director, Division of Pharmacy Professional Development, Professor, Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi ; (Speaker) Lucinda Maine, Ph.D., R.Ph., Former Executive Vice President and CEO, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Lee Vermeulen, Jr., B.S., M.S., Executive Vice President and CEO, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

Closing Reception

Texas C, D 


Wednesday, July 27

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Center Pre-function

7:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Center Pre-function

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2022. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions and assist with the AACP meeting app.

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

See Me to Teach Me: Developing a D&I Climate Assessment Utilizing an Interprofessional, Student-Centered Approach

Grapevine A

Addressing health disparities and providing culturally-sensitive and relevant patient care are areas of emphasis in the curriculum of schools of pharmacy. But what about valuing diversity among the school’s own population and creating an inclusive environment within the institution itself? Assessing the perception of the diversity and inclusivity climate within a school of pharmacy is a crucial step to creating a safe and successful learning environment.

(Speaker) Chinenye Anyanwu, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Khanh (Devra) Dang, BCPS, CDE, FNAP, Associate Clinical Professor, University of Connecticut

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Session Sign-in

Texas Ballroom Pre-function

All delegates are required to sign in on Sunday and Wednesday for the Credentials Committee to determine the quorum for business.

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

If It’s Broken You Gotta Fix It: Repairing Damaged or Strained Learner-Preceptor Relationships

Grapevine C

In an ideal setting, preceptors and learners are perfect personalities and learning style matches to partner for success. Unfortunately, in the real world, that is not always the case. Preceptors and learners may experience incongruence including personality mismatch or conflicts leading to damaged relationships. In this session we will review causes of preceptor/learner incongruence and equip attendees with real-world solutions from the perspectives of both individual preceptors and experiential programs.

At the completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe common causes of preceptor-learner incongruence.
  2. Identify strategies and techniques in management of preceptor-learner incongruence.
  3. Given a case, apply solutions for preceptors/programs to mend a preceptor-learner relationship

0581-0000-22-169-L99-P, 1.00 Contact Hour, Activity Type: Application-based

(Speaker) Meredith L. Howard, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor and Chair, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Megan Wesling, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, Assistant Professor and PGY2 Ambulatory Care Residency Coordinator, The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth; (Speaker) Cheng Yuet, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDCES, Medical Science Liaison, Amgen

8:45 a.m.–9:15 a.m.

Professional Identity: Being Intentional About Creating Your Brand

Grapevine A

In a policy statement issued in 2020, AACP encouraged colleges and schools of pharmacy to advance pharmacy education by being intentional about the process of Professional Identity Formation. During this session, we will describe the steps taken at Howard University College of Pharmacy leading to the establishment of the Professional Identity Formation & Cultivation Committee. The duties, responsibilities and outcomes of an effective committee will be clearly defined.

(Speaker) Careen-Joan Franklin, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, Howard University; (Speaker) Yolanda B. McKoy-Beach, Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, Howard University

9:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Session

Texas Ballroom

The final business of the 2022 House of Delegates will occur at this session. Delegates will be seated only if they signed in between 9:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m. on Wednesday morning.