Pharmacy Education 2019 Programming

AACP Article

Pre-Sessions

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program

Fee: $250. Pre-registration recommended; registration includes lunch and beverage breaks.

Saturday, July 13

10:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program

Administrative and Financial Officers Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

The Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG program is designed for administrative and financial officers, as well as other AACP participants interested in key administrative issues that influence the operations of colleges of pharmacy. This half-day program will provide participants the opportunity to engage in meaningful discussions regarding communication and facilities planning within colleges of pharmacy, as well as other areas of responsibility within finance and administration roles.

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program: Information Dissemination Strategy

Administrative and Financial Officers Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Join us for a discussion on how organizations disseminate critical information to appropriate parties. This active learning session will engage in topics that cover the challenges of communication, how organizational structures play a role, and how we ensure relevant constituents get the information they require.

(Chair and Moderator) Robert Lamb, Mercer University

11:00 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Beverage Break and Networking 

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program: Moderated Session: Individual Communication Needs

Administrative and Financial Officers Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Communication is key! This session will review personal communication styles and how to improve two-way communication skills in the workplace. 

(Speaker) Laurie Schellenberger, University of Illinois at Chicago

12:15 p.m.–1:15 p.m.

AFO SIG Program Lunch and Rapid Fire/Business Items

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program: Communicating with Tact and Finesse

Administrative and Financial Officers Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Understand how to engage in crucial conversations, and how to carefully and calmly deliver unfavorable information.

(Speaker) Heather Petrelli, University of South Florida  

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Break

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m. 

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Program: Facilities – Program and Design Principles

Administrative and Financial Officers Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Learn from an expert on space planning how design affects programming, and how design principles should be utilized to enhance learning and outcomes. Hear from pharmacy and health science colleges on the impact space design had at their campuses. 

(Speaker) Rebecca McDuffie, Lord Aeck Sargent; (Speaker) Kerrie Mistry, Lothan Van Hook Destefano Architecture

Admissions Workshop

Thursday, July 11

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

PharmCAS Advisory Committee Meeting

Closed meeting of the 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 PharmCAS Advisory Committee.

(Chair) Jonathan M. Parker, Samford University; (Moderator) Katie O. Bruce, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

PharmCAS Advisory Committee Dinner

Off Property - TBD

Closed dinner for the 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 PharmCAS Advisory Committee.

Friday, July 12

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Admissions Workshop Registration Desk

Columbus Hall Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

8:00 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: Application Service Updates, Policy Review and Future Plans

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

AACP and Liaison staff will share preliminary cycle data, an overview of application service policies, and updates for the 2019-2020 application cycle and beyond.

(Speaker) Katie O. Bruce, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Deborah Erdner, Liaison International, Inc.; (Speaker) Libby J. Ross, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Eileen Szczesuil, Liaison International, Inc.

9:45 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: Beverage Break 1

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Administrative Services Section

Columbus Hall Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

10:00 a.m.–Noon

Admissions Workshop: WebAdMIT Training for Intermediate and Advanced Users

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Intermediate and advanced PharmCAS/PharmGrad/PharmDirect users, this session is for you! This session will be led by a Liaison training team expert with relevant examples from the PharmCAS Advisory Committee. Topics include 1) Managing admissions roles through workgroups, assignments and interviews, 2) Scoring and ranking applications, 3) Reports, 4) Lists and exports, and 5) Connecting with university software. Bring your laptop!

(Speaker) Stephen Naso, Liaison International, Inc. and members of the PharmCAS Advisory Committee

10:00 a.m.–Noon

Admissions Workshop: WebAdMIT Training for New Users

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

First-time and beginner PharmCAS/PharmGrad/PharmDirect users and any admissions teams who do not use WebAdMIT for admission processing, this session is for you! This session will cover the basics of how to access applicant information, how to set admissions decisions, and how to utilize the configuration portal. Basic applicant processing techniques will also be covered.

(Speaker) Katie O. Bruce, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Clutter, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Nicole Iarossi, Liaison International, Inc.

Noon–1:15 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Lunch

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

1:15 p.m.–2:05 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Building a Passion Around Pharmacy Through Student-Led Organizations and Tips to Increase Pharmacy Pipeline

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Pre-pharmacy day events not only create a pipeline of prospective applicants, but they also provide students with the opportunity to showcase their leadership abilities and build lasting relationships with pharmacy programs. This session will explore the design and launch of these student-led events and how admissions offices can develop strategic partnerships, and re-create these pre-pharmacy day events in their shared regions.

(Speaker) Hetty Y. Ha, University of California, Irvine; (Speaker) Mark S. Nelson, University of Michigan; (Speaker) Helen C. Park, Roseman University of Health Sciences

2:15 p.m.–3:05 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Building Enrollment and Revenue Projection Models

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

We will review methods and models to project student enrollment and net revenue, and key enrollment indicators that drive enrollment by various student types. Building various projection models can help us: 1. Analyze current market and institutional trends, 2. Understand primary drivers that affect enrollment and revenue outcomes, and 3. Influence future strategy and decisions. Additionally, we will discuss accounting for new tactics deployed that influence future projections and refining models to accommodate changes in enrollment goals.

(Speaker) Elizabeth Keserauskis, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

3:05 p.m.–3:25 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Beverage Break 2

Columbus Hall Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

3:25 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Student Ambassadors: Cultivating Leadership Through Student Participation in Recruitment, Outreach and Mentorship

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

University of Washington Pharm.D. students have the opportunity to serve as Admissions Ambassadors and/or peer mentors for first-year students. In this session, we present the strategies and outcomes of our student leadership opportunities and how they directly impact our admissions process. University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy (SCP) utilize their Pharm.D. Student Ambassadors to reach prospective students with targeted messages through student webinars and virtual campus tours. SCP Student Ambassadors share their unique perspective about expectations of students, class scheduling, curriculum, housing options and overall culture of the program.

(Speaker) Anthony D. Bissiri, University of Washington; (Speaker) Casandra L. Castillo, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Antonia D. Kilpatrick, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Rick V Turner, University of Washington

4:25 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Increasing Verified Applications in a Challenging Market: How Three Pharmacy Programs Reimagined Their Recruitment

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

When James Barrett came on board as Director of Admissions at Northeast Ohio Medical (NEOMED) University, the College of Pharmacy needed to grow its number of verified applications. This wasn't a unique challenge — in fact, Manchester University's Director of Admissions and Enrollment Management, Greg Hetrick, and the Medical College of Wisconsin's Director of Student Affairs, Shaun Keating, faced similar challenges as well. During this session, these three panelists will share how they reimagined their approaches to inquiry management. They'll talk through how they grew verified applications, increased deposits and more effectively managed enrollment in a competitive market by implementing a robust, flexible marketing platform+CRM designed for higher ed.

(Speaker) James Barrett, Northeast Ohio Medical University; (Speaker) Gregory B. Hetrick, Manchester University; (Speaker) Shaun Keating, Medical College of Wisconsin

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Admissions Workshop Reception—hosted by Liaison

Columbus Hall Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Saturday, July 13

8:00 a.m.–8:50 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: PCAT Update and Discussion

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Members of the PCAT Advisory Committee will share the latest PCAT trends and updates, and discuss the shifting role of the standardized exam in the pharmacy admissions process.

(Speaker) Robin L. Corelli, University of California, San Fransico; (Speaker) Mary L. Euler, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Jamie L. Hall, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Jason S. Haney, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University

8:00 a.m.–8:50 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: PharmGrad 101

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

PharmGrad is a web-based service for graduate admissions. PharmGrad was launched in 2016-2017 and currently has 16 participating programs across 9 institutions. This session will give participants an overview of PharmGrad and discuss how two pharmacy schools have utilized this service to develop and enhance their graduate program. Participants will gain with valuable resources such as the power of data, sample email templates, sample local statuses, and better understanding the variances between PharmGrad and PharmCAS.

(Speaker) Kirsten F. Block, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Katie O. Bruce, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Julie Cogley-Pifko, Manchester University; (Speaker) Jason M. Hartfield, Keck Graduate Institute

9:00 a.m.–9:50 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: Choices, Choices, Choices: Seeking Synergy in Pharm.D. and Ph.D. Admissions

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Potential Pharm.D. students and graduate students have choices – lots of choices! This session targeted at Pharm.D. and graduate admissions stakeholders will describe how understanding career decision-making processes can assist colleges and schools in developing and implementing interventions to foster Pharm.D. and graduate student recruitment. Attendees will explore mechanisms through which Pharm.D. and graduate programs can collaborate to promote evidence- and experience-informed career decisions among potential matriculants.

(Speaker) Nicholas E. Hagemeier, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Russell B. Melchert, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Samuel M. Poloyac, University of Pittsburgh

9:50 a.m.–10:10 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: Beverage Break 3

Columbus Hall Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

10:10 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: Beyond the MMI Approach – Strategies to Find the “Best Fit” Candidates

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) are increasingly being promoted (though not universally accepted) as a superior way to select applicants for admission to Pharm.D. programs. Three pharmacy schools that have decided against using MMIs will describe processes they use to evaluate and select applicants for admission. Speakers representing each institution will describe how they use various components of the interview day to determine which applicants are most suited for their programs.

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Clutter, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Mary L. Euler, West Virginia University; (Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Jeremy A. Hughes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University

10:10 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: Graduate Student Recruitment-Best Practices

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session will focus on developing and identifying effective recruitment strategies so that administrators of graduate programs can attract highly motivated and bright graduate students. Modern marketing mediums that can effectively communicate with the current generation of applicants will be discussed in roundtable format seeking audience input and participation. The goal of this session is for participants to learn new and cost effective approaches to attract the best applicants for college of pharmacy graduate programs.

(Speaker) Richard R. Vaillancourt, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Alok Bhushan, Thomas Jefferson University

11:10 a.m.–Noon

Admissions Workshop: Beg, Borrow and Steal...Tech Tools to Survive With Limited Resources

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Do you work for a small college/university? Are you expected to do more with less? This session was designed to share a few digital tools and step-by-step DIY tips to improve your digital presence, increase productivity, track engagement, and improve retention. You will be given examples, samples, and tips on email development with Google Analytics campaign tags, step-by-step instructions on creating Facebook/Instagram ads, plus a few tools to help you organize and prioritize your workday.

(Speaker) Kimberly J. Dunn, Campbell University; (Speaker) Jeffrey G. Jurkas, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) W. Mark Moore, Campbell University

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Lunch & Networking

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

1:30 p.m.–2:20 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Building Rural and Urban Institutional Partnerships to Expand and Diversify Undergraduate Admission Pipelines

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This presentation discusses the successes and challenges of engaging in articulation agreements and institutional partnerships to expand student pharmacist enrollment pools on our campuses. We discuss how MCW leverages reverse transfer and degree completion agreements to drive enrollments among diverse student populations in STEM fields. We also explore articulation strategies used at WSU to encourage rural, place-bound, and urban student enrollment on both our extension campus and main campus to better-match our community demographics.

(Speaker) Damianne Brand-Eubanks, Washington State University; (Speaker) Shaun Keating, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Kim Mickey, Washington State University

1:30 p.m.–2:20 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Educating the Next Generation of Pharmacists

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Given the national decline in application numbers, promoting the pharmacy profession at an early age is more important than ever. This session will give participants an overview of how the University of Washington & Manchester University has incorporated interactive activities to promote the pharmacy profession to K-12 students. Attendees will participate in interactive sessions and will have the opportunity to share what their institution is doing to educate the next generation of pharmacists.

(Speaker) Julie Cogley-Pifko, Manchester University; (Speaker) McKenzie E. Grubb, Manchester University; (Speaker) Jennifer Danielson, University of Washington

2:30 p.m.–3:20 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Building Pipelines for Underrepresented Students and Recruitment Strategies

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This workshop will present a variety of recruitment strategies for reaching and adding underrepresented students to your student base. Representatives from UConn, a multi-site public institution in Connecticut, and Northeastern, a private institution based in Boston will present the unique challenges and similarities they face. We will examine approaches to student recruitment that reach strong, STEM interested high school students, undeclared science-focused undergraduates, and includes visits, camps, social media and current student involvement.

(Speaker) Karin Burgess, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Philip M. Hritcko, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Tayla Rose, Northeastern University

3:20 p.m.–3:40 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Beverage Break 4

Columbus Hall Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

3:40 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: An Immersive Strategy to Enhance Recruitment and Align Program-Specific Psychological Expectations

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

To provide Pharm.D. applicants with an authentic interview day experience, our programs have developed a range of immersive strategies. Current students, administration, and faculty are highly engaged in the process and provide applicants a unique experience related to the pedagogy, curriculum, and experiential opportunities available within the Pharm.D. program. During the interview day, applicants are engaged directly in team-based learning and other active learning methods, including a manikin-based simulation exercise. This approach not only stimulates student interest in the profession of pharmacy but also assists applicants in determining which program best fits their psychological expectations.

(Speaker) Suzanne Clark, California Northstate University; (Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Jeremy A. Hughes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Tiffany-Jade M. Kreys, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Jason McDowell, California Northstate University

3:40 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: 0-6 Programs: A Legacy of Direct High School Admission

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Recruiting Pharm.D. students directly from high school has become increasing prevalent. 0-6 schools have long recruited this student population. Three 0-6 schools will provide some of their recruitment strategies and highlight efforts they take to help ensure the true college freshmen is able to enroll in the professional Pharm.D. programs.

(Speaker) Emily M. Ambizas, St. John's University; (Speaker) Suzanne Dinsmore, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) Mary-Kathleen Grams, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) Matthew M. Lacroix, The University of Rhode Island

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Round Up

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Attendees will reconvene to close out the 2019 Admissions Workshop sharing final impressions, questions, and insights.

Early Career Faculty Program

Fee: $75. Pre-registration recommended, limited space available.

Saturday, July 13

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Early Career Faculty Program: Collaboration and Developing as a Faculty Researcher

Graduate Education Special Interest Group

Michigan 3 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Establishing and sustaining successful research collaboration requires continuous development of competencies across multiple domains. This workshop will introduce tools to recognize and develop those competencies and set goals for collaborative research programs. Faculty researchers will share insights and strategies to promote individual development, support trainee growth and establish productive partnerships. Participants are encouraged to come prepared to share their experiences and discuss their own research goals.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify at least one challenge or opportunity related to individual development as a researcher that is unique to the environment within a pharmacy school.
  2. Develop a plan to advance at least one research career goal using a competency framework and an individual development plan.
  3. Formulate elements of a research collaboration plan that leverage participant strengths and mitigates their weaknesses.

(Speaker) Samuel M. Poloyac, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Erik Burns, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists; (Speaker) Margie E. Snyder, Purdue University College of Pharmacy

Teachers Seminar

Saturday, July 13

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Teachers Seminar Breakfast

Grand Ballroom AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Teachers Seminar: Collaborative Team Teaching: Strategies for Success: Keynote: Team Teaching: What the Science of Learning Can Tell Us

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Faculty in the health sciences are moving towards models of team teaching and team based learning. These are very much in line with what we know about the science of learning. In this presentation, we will explore different reasons for why reintroducing material in a different context can really help students learn more effectively. We will also discuss the various strategies that have been shown to help students begin to develop an appreciation and understanding for why curricula should be structured this way. Finally, helpful tips on how to do this as effectively as possible will be shared.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss why the science of learning supports team teaching.
  2. Describe two strategies for incorporating team teaching into their curriculum.
  3. Discuss and practice strategies for helping students connect content across contexts.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-030-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Chris Hakala, Springfield College; (Moderator) Daniel A. Brazeau, Marshall University

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Teachers Seminar: Team Teaching Part 1: Functional Teams: An Oxymoron?

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Functional teams are often something we all seem to be chasing. Personalities, or lack thereof, work styles, diverse habits, and trust… Can we really all just get along? This session will explore how we define functional teams and what it takes for teams to be functional, what that may look like for you and your team(s), and some tangible methods to maximize team productivity, even if some players don’t put in the time to plan.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe characteristics that make teams successful
  2. Assess individual workstyles and what we bring to a team
  3. Discuss strategies to building trust and holding teammates accountable in a non-punitive way.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-031-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Vibhuti Arya, St. John's University; (Speaker) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University

10:30 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Teachers Seminar Morning Beverage Break

Grand Ballroom AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

10:45 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Teachers Seminar: Team Teaching Part 2: Wait, We Can Actually Have Fun?

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Team teaching can sometimes focus so much on outcomes that the value of the process can get lost. The development of these teams and experience working together can have meaningful impact in and beyond the classroom. This session will explore how to maximize team performance and provide strategies to actually make team teaching fun (imagine that)! We will explore team dynamics, differences between big and small teams, and how to strategize for challenges related to team teaching, including single vs. multiple teams that teach within a given semester.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Engage audience in interactive play to explore team dynamics and how to maximize team performance.
  2. Discuss challenges related to team teaching.
  3. Explore strategies that provide tangible tools and techniques for effective team teaching.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-032-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Vibhuti Arya, St. John's University; (Speaker) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University

11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Lunch

Grand Ballroom AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Teachers Seminar: Another Evaluation? Preparing and Conducting Meaningful Peer Teaching Evaluations

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Meaningful peer teaching evaluations require planning and effort on both the instructor and evaluator. This session will examine the purpose of peer teaching evaluations, challenge attendees to develop meaningful reflections of teaching, provide advice for preparation of evaluations, and describe various process of peer evaluations. Concepts discussed will be related to team teaching and individual teaching in the classroom setting as well as individual precepting in the experiential setting.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify goals and objectives of a peer teaching evaluation.
  2. Describe subjective and objective content to be included within a teaching reflection to maximize feedback.
  3. Describe a process for how to prepare and conduct a peer evaluation of teaching.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-033-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Lea S. Eiland, Auburn University; (Speaker) Michael J. Gonyeau, Northeastern University

1:45 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Afternoon Beverage Break

Grand Ballroom AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

2:00 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Teachers Seminar: A+: Best Practices of Team Teaching

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Key leaders from colleges and schools of pharmacy will present their best practices of designing, implementing, and evaluating team teaching in a pharmacy curriculum. Success, challenges, and outcomes of team teaching will be discussed using real scenarios. Time will be allotted for questions and answers. The last 15 minutes will highlight key messages of the day and ideas for bringing team teaching to your institution.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify core considerations essential to team teaching.
  2. Apply examples of best practices of team teaching design and evaluation to their institution.
  3. Develop a plan to implement one or more of the team teaching best practices highlighted during the session.
  4. Summarize key messages of the day.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-034-L04-P 1.25 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Shannon Kinney, Western New England University; (Speaker) Arin Whitman, Western New England University; (Speaker) Bradley Wright, Auburn University

Programming

Friday and Saturday

Friday, July 12

4:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2019 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

Saturday, July 13

7:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

AACP Walmart Scholars Orientation

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Required session for the AACP Walmart Scholars, so that they may make the most of their experience at the Annual Meeting.

(Moderator) Libby J. Ross, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Steven A. Scott, Purdue University

7:00 a.m.–6:30 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2019 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

12:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

PharmGrad Advisory Committee Meeting

Randolph 3 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Closed meeting of the 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 PharmGrad Advisory Committee.

(Chair) Kimberly J. Dunn, Campbell University; (Moderator) Katie O. Bruce, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Moderator) Kirsten F. Block, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

PharmCAS R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect - Saturday

Grand Suite 5 (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Taking care of business sometimes requires taking care of yourself in the process. AACP is making it easy with the PharmCAS R&R Lounge—designed to offer attendees a brief but much-needed respite from crowds, noise and other common meeting stresses, while keeping you fresh for the business of learning and networking. Kick up your feet, check your e-mail, charge your phone, tablet or laptop and unwind. There will be four laptop kiosks available on a first-come, first-served basis. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment. With support from our sponsor, PharmCAS, powered by Liaison, the lounge services are complimentary so make time to stop by for a little R&R!

1:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

School Poster Session

Annual Meeting Registration & Name Badge Required

Acapulco, Hong Kong, Toronto (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This year's theme is "Leading Change in Pharmacy Education"

3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Council of Deans Administrative Board Meeting

Closed Meeting

Monroe 3 Boardroom (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Evan T. Robinson, Western New England University

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Council of Faculties Administrative Board

Monroe 4 Boardroom (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Daniel A. Brazeau, Marshall University; (Moderator) Daniel A. Brazeau, Marshall University

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Junior Faculty and First Timers Annual Meeting Orientation and Networking Session

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Attendees are invited to a session to share, learn and network with colleagues about the wonderful opportunities available through the AACP Annual Meeting and AACP membership.

(Speaker) David D. Allen, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Daniel A. Brazeau, Marshall University; (Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, University of Florida; (Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Terry J. Ryan, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Council of Sections Business Meeting

Michigan 2 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Closed business meeting of the Council of Sections members, consisting of the section chairs, chairs-elect and immediate past chairs. Section secretaries are also invited to attend.

(Chair) Jennifer Danielson, University of Washington

3:45 p.m.– 5:45 p.m.

Teaching-Scholarship-Service: Building the Three Pillars to Support Your Academic Career

Grand CDEF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

For those interested in academic careers, it is never too early to consider your approach to teaching, scholarship and service. Power skills such as effectively communicating your teaching philosophy and fostering collaborations will set you apart from other jobseekers and set you up for success. Students, residents, fellows and faculty are invited to attend this interactive workshop that will provide you with tips and tools to craft a teaching statement and engage in scholarly collaborations.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recognize the value of a well-articulated teaching philosophy.
  2. Describe experiences consistent with your teaching philosophy.
  3. Compare independent and collaborative scholarly activity.
  4. Examine strategies to build productive collaborations.

(Speaker) Beth A. Martin, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Channing R. Ford, Auburn University; (Speaker) Terri L. Warholak, The University of Arizona; (Speaker)Lindsey Hohmann, Auburn University; (Speaker) James R. Fuchs, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Christina A. Sherrill, High Point University; (Moderator) Justin Gatwood, The University of Tennessee

4:00 p.m.– 5:00 p.m.

Catholic Pharmacists Mass

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

 

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section Welcome

Library and Information Science Section

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

All librarians and information professionals are invited to this orientation to AACP Annual Meeting programs and events. The session will also include information for the Grace and Harold Sewell Memorial Fund stipend recipients regarding the requirements of their awards. An update of the section mentorship program will also be provided.

(Moderator) Leslie A. Bowman, University of the Sciences; (Chair) Vern Duba, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Melissa L Hunter, University of Wyoming

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Welcome Reception

Crystal Ballroom (Lobby Level, West Tower)

Kick off Pharmacy Education 2019 at the AACP Welcome Reception. Enjoy hors d'ouevres and beverages while getting to network with your peers. Don't miss the opportunity to preview School Posters with the authors too!

7:30 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section Welcome Dinner

Library and Information Science Section

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

No host welcome social hour and dinner for all members of the Library and Information Science Section and their guests.

(Speaker) Jennifer R. Martin, The University of Arizona

Sunday

All Day

Meet the Editor

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education? Or signing up to be a manuscript reviewer? Do you have a question about AJPE? Stop by and meet the editor, associate editors and editorial staff of AJPE. We'll be here during breakfast and beverage break times!

(Chair) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University

6:00 a.m.–7:00 a.m.

AM Fitness Program

Plaza Ballroom, Lobby Level, East Tower

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

ALFP Alumni Networking Breakfast

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

ALFP Alumni networking breakfast, a time for past Fellows to reacquaint with each other.

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Prayer Breakfast

Limited Seating

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Grab your continental breakfast and join us for the prayer breakfast.

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

First House of Delegates Sign-In

Group Office Registration Desk (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

All delegates are required to sign in on Sunday and Wednesday so the Credentials Committee can determine the quorum for business.

(Speaker) Craig D. Cox, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center; (Speaker) Russell B. Melchert, University of Missouri-Kansas City

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Networking Room 1 of 3

Monroe Boardroom 1 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Want to catch up with old friends, meet new ones or discuss similar interests? Want to continue the discussion from a fantastic session? Come to the Networking Rooms or schedule time at the AACP Registration and Help Desk.

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Networking Room 2 of 3

Monroe Boardroom 2 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Networking Room 3 of 3

Monroe Boardroom 3 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2019 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Meditation Room

Grand Suite 2B (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Opening General Session: Leadership in Turbulent Times

Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

World-renowned presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin reflects on more than 150 years of U.S. history to put into context our most recent unprecedented presidency – a fast-paced, unpredictable and at times impulsive Administration. By sharing her deep understanding of the ambition, resolution and resilience of some of our nation’s most revered presidents, Goodwin explains how past setbacks and triumphs shed light on the cultural, economic and political transformations that define today’s turbulent times. With a goal of educating and entertaining audiences, Goodwin brings to life some of our most successful presidents to provide insight for today’s leaders, and to demonstrate that however fractured our modern political culture has become, our democracy is also resilient and has survived—even thrived—through more troubling times in the past.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to

  1. List examples of the ambition, resolution and resilience of some of our nation’s past presidents, and the lessons for aspiring and established leaders.
  2. Describe how past setbacks and triumphs shed light on the cultural, economic and political transformations that define today’s turbulent times.
  3. Explain how our democracy has remained resilient in past troubling times

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-035-L04-P 0.75 Contact Hours)

(Moderator) David D. Allen, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Doris Kearns Goodwin

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Grand Suite 5 (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Taking care of business sometimes requires taking care of yourself in the process. AACP is making it easy with the PharmCAS R&R Lounge—designed to offer attendees a brief but much-needed respite from crowds, noise and other common meeting stresses, while keeping you fresh for the business of learning and networking. Kick up your feet, check your e-mail, charge your phone, tablet or laptop and unwind. There will be four laptop kiosks available on a first-come, first-served basis. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment. With support from our sponsor, PharmCAS, powered by Liaison, the lounge services are complimentary so make time to stop by for a little R&R!

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Spouse/Guests Hospitality Room

Grand Suite 1 (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

AM Beverage Break

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

9:30 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Doris Kearns Goodwin Book Signing

Columbus GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Join keynote speaker, Doris Kearns Goodwin, as she signs copies of her book Leadership in Turbulent Times. A culmination of Goodwin’s five-decade career of studying the American presidents focusing on Presidents Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Baines Johnson, the book provides an accessible and essential road map for aspiring and established leaders in every field, and for all of us in our everyday lives. Books will be available onsite for purchase.

(Speaker) Doris Kearns Goodwin

9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

RiteAid Headshot Cafe

Grand Registration Foyer, Ballroom Level, East Tower

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Improving Preceptor Feedback Skills in 75 Minutes or Less

Experiential Education Section, Continuing Professional Development Section

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This mini-session will provide experiential education program leaders with a turn-key tool kit for conducting an innovative 75-minute site-based preceptor development workshop designed to improve preceptor feedback skills. Program evaluation data will be shared based on experience with prior workshops, as well as a complete set of case scenarios, assessment rubrics, and recommended workshop structure. Participants will leave this session with the tools needed to conduct similar workshops for preceptors within their network.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the components of a site-based preceptor development workshop focused on giving feedback.
  2. Implement an abbreviated workshop activity through role play and self-assessment.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-036-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kathryn A. Schott, Drake University; (Speaker) Cheryl L. Clarke, Drake University

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Partnering With Schools of Social Work on Interprofessional Simulations Focused on Social Determinants and Behavioral Health  

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Future pharmacists should address social determinants of health (SDOH) and behavioral health to provide patient-centered care. Pharmacy schools have included these topics in the curriculum. Typically students learn about these issues in a silo using classroom-based pedagogies. Partnering with Schools of Social Work and incorporating SDOH and behavioral health into interprofessional simulations is an enhanced pedagogy to expose students to these concepts. We will share implementation and assessment strategies using our simulation as a case-study.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe an interprofessional simulation focused on social determinants of health and behavioral health and the impact it had on pharmacy and social work learners
  2. Collaborate with attendees to identify additional activities focused on social determinants of health and behavioral health to apply at home institution.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-037-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Ashley Crowl, The University of Kansas

10:00 a.m.–11:00 am

Topical Roundtable Session 1

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app.

(Moderator) Steven C. Stoner, University of Missouri-Kansas City

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

How to Embed Pediatric Content Within the Required Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum

Pediatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Current ACPE recommendations require emphasis in knowledge and skill progression across the lifespan, including pediatric patients, but many students lack exposure. The 2005 recommendations of the ACCP Pediatric PRN suggested 25 hours of pediatric-focused content in Pharm.D. programs. However, a recent survey found the majority offer 16 content hours, offering an opportunity for improvement. Pharmacy practice faculty, lab faculty, and administrators will explore curriculum mapping, strategic integration, and assessment of pediatric content within Pharm.D. programs

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the ACPE recommendations that pertain to special populations.
  2. Summarize the current state of pediatric content in Pharm.D. programs.
  3. Compare and contrast two different strategies for implementing pediatric content in the required curriculum.
  4. Outline steps colleges of pharmacy can take to increase the amount of pediatric content and skills in the required Pharm.D. curricula.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-038-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Peter N. Johnson, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Chad Knoderer, Butler University; (Speaker) Melanie K. Claborn, Southwestern Oklahoma State University

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Practicing Understanding: Strategies to Orient Non-Practice Faculty to the Pharmacy Profession and Professional Education

Administrative Services Section, Continuing Professional Development Section, Assessment Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

ACPE Standard 19.4 requires that faculty of all disciplines possess an “…understanding of and commitment to advancing current and proposed future pharmacy practice.” In this session, four presenters will each discuss their unique experiences in establishing strategies to orient non-practice faculty to the pharmacy profession and professional education. Additionally, presenters will summarize the current literature surrounding best practices in cross-disciplinary understanding. This session is targeted to any member of a College/School of Pharmacy.

(Speaker) Sigrid C. Roberts, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Jennifer Lamberts, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Lisa Lebovitz, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Kimberly K. Daugherty, Sullivan University

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

The Assessment of Non-Cognitive Skills and Attributes for Entry into Pharmacy Education

Assessment Special Interest Group, Administrative Services Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Randolph 3 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Traditional admissions practices in pharmacy have placed a larger emphasis on academic measures over non-cognitive assessments to guide selection decisions. However, a successful pharmacist needs to possess a strong foundation of knowledge, effective practice skills, and exceptional personal qualities. In this session, we will provide an overview of the available non-cognitive tools which programs can incorporate into their existing admissions process to gain a more comprehensive view of potential candidates.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the value of non-cognitive assessments in the admissions process and how they can complement the cognitive metrics
  2. Summarize the various non-cognitive assessment tools that are currently available for pharmacy school admissions
  3. Analyze the effectiveness of a particular assessment from both a psychometric and feasibility perspective for use in admissions
  4. Improve the pharmacy school admissions process by proposing ways in which a non-cognitive assessment can be incorporated into the existing process.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-039-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jill Hall, University of Alberta; (Speaker) Harold I Reiter, McMaster University; (Speaker) Gilles Leclerc, University of Montreal; (Speaker) Andrea J. Cameron, University of Toronto

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

First House of Delegates Session

Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

All Annual Meeting attendees are welcome to come and hear reports from AACP leaders and guests, including incoming President Todd Sorenson's remarks. Candidates for the office of President-elect will be introduced during the session and an initial report on the business before the House will be provided by the Bylaws & Policy Development Committee.

(Speaker) Todd D. Sorensen, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Michael L. Manolakis, Wingate University

10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

Pharmacy Development: Funding Essentials for the Changing Pharmacy Profession

Development Directors Special Interest Group

Crystal C (Lobby Level, West Tower)

During our session, we will hear from experts in the areas of planned giving and corporate relations, hear success stories of fundraising for pharmacy, and participate in benchmarking activities. We will hear the latest in tax changes and how that could affect donor retention. Please bring one item with your school's logo for exchange and examples of your alumni communications.

(Speaker) John C. Woods, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Elizabeth Zipper, University of Florida; (Speaker) Susan Brown, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Tom Dauber, The Ohio State University

10:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

NACDS Community Pharmacy-based Point-of-Care Testing Certificate & Train-the-Trainer Programs, Hosted by POC Consultants, Inc.

Roosevelt 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

These back-to-back sessions not only provide students with an opportunity to earn a certificate of completion, they offer pharmacy schools a practical way to begin offering the NACDS Point-of-Care Testing (POCT) program as part of the Pharm.D. curriculum. Faculty can now complete the live portion of the home study and take Train-the-Trainer (TTT) to become an instructor all in one day.

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Enhancing the Layered Learning Model: Empowering Residents to Use Entrustable Professional Activities as Experiential Co-Preceptors

Experiential Education Section, Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

The target audience includes college of pharmacy faculty and preceptors interested in training pharmacy residents to become more versed in the use of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) in experiential education. This session will focus on strategies to build buy-in among pharmacy residents in using EPAs to evaluate student performance as co-preceptors. This program will be of particular interest to preceptors currently implementing or interested in implementing a layered learning experiential model.

(Speaker) Tressa E. McMorris, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Dustin Tate Christensen-Grant, Roseman University of Health Sciences

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

I-P-E for the E-Y-E. Pharm.D. and Optometry Students Collaborate to Improve Nonprescription Ophthalmic Product Knowledge

Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription medicine Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

In healthcare, interprofessional education (IPE) is a key factor in providing patient-centered, high-quality care. This session will describe an interprofessional interactive activity with pharmacy and optometry students enrolled in their final professional year working alongside pharmacists and optometrists to review common self-treatable ophthalmic conditions. The activity culminates with a hands-on component that examine samples of commonly available nonprescription ophthalmic products. The target audience includes pharmacy educators with a focus in ambulatory care and community practice.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe an innovative, hands-on Interprofessional Education activity that improves Doctor of Pharmacy and Optometry students' knowledge of nonprescription ophthalmic products and self-treatable ophthalmic conditions.
  2. Discuss opportunities to collaborate with allied health professionals to enrich pharmacy students' ability to provide optimal patient care.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-040-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Stephanie Conway, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Kaelen C. Dunican, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Connecting the Elements to Amplify Global Change

Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

To facilitate transformative change in health care systems is a bigger goal than any one conference can achieve. Yet traditionally the agendas for pharmacy education and practice meetings around the world are developed independently. In 2019, there are four global pharmacy meetings that share complementary goals to develop, connect, and empower leadership. In this session, we will describe how a coalition approach to fostering a mindset of global citizenship can amplify individual elements of change.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe qualities of global citizenship as they pertain to pharmacy education and practice.
  2. Explain how the dialogue of global citizenship is connected across pharmacy education and practice conferences worldwide.
  3. Define the elements of change that can influence development of global citizenship skills amongst educators, practitioners, and students in pharmacy.
  4. Determine at least one action for amplifying these elements of change.
  5. Commit to sharing the results on the PharmAcademy platform in order for others to continue to learn.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-041-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kari L. Franson, University of Colorado; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) John A. Pieper, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jodie V. Malhotra, University of Colorado

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

From Prevention to Crisis: Addressing Student Mental Health Every Step of the Way

Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Public Health Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Mental health and wellness of pharmacists is on the radar of professional pharmacy organizations. However, published literature of effective strategies for improving mental well-being is sparse in pharmacy education literature. Speakers will discuss the design, implementation, and promotion of innovative strategies to improve mental health in two schools. These strategies range from preventative, crisis response, and educational programs. Attendees will be given opportunities to apply these examples to build on ideas for their own institutions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how prevention, crisis management, and educational strategies can address barriers and improve care for students with mental health issues.
  2. Discuss how an approach for referring students exhibiting concerning behaviors can prevent progression to a crisis.
  3. Compare and contrast available crisis response workflows implemented in two pharmacy schools for students with acute needs.
  4. Incorporate interventions discussed in the development of innovative educational programs to increase awareness in mental health and reduce the risk of suicide.
  5. Adapt ideas presented for the development of interventions in one’s own learning environment.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-042-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Suzanne C. Harris, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Heidi N. Anksorus, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Kelly N. Gable, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Colleen Wernoski; (Speaker) Amber D. Frick, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Interprofessional diagnosis: A Call to Action for Pharmacy

Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Accurate and timely diagnosis is the foundation of safe, effective patient care. The Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine has developed 12 interprofessional competencies for individuals, teams and systems to improve diagnosis. This session will introduce the competencies, share how they map to the pharmacist patient care process, ACPE, CAPE, and entrustable professional activities, and challenge participants to consider ways to incorporate the competencies into existing pharmacy curriculum.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Provide the context and development of interprofessional diagnosis competencies
  2. Discuss the role of pharmacists in the diagnostic process and in preventing and detecting diagnostic errors
  3. Describe how the interprofessional diagnosis competencies map to ACPE standards, the pharmacist patient care process, and entrustable professional activities.
  4. Synthesize examples of how existing curriculum can address interprofessional diagnosis competencies.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-043-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Mark L Graber, Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine; (Speaker) Jeannine M. Conway, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Gloria Grice, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

It's a Matter of Life and Death: Opioid Training for Professional Students

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Crystal B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Participants will have the opportunity to discover approaches which may be used to train pharmacy students on the opioid crisis and naloxone use. Interprofessional, simulation based, and community organized events will all be explored during the session with lessons learned from two Universities provided throughout.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Understand the importance of opioid and naloxone training for pharmacy students.
  2. Discuss lessons learned from various methodologies and explore ways to improve the training options currently being used.
  3. Bring training methods back to their institution in order to understand which method may work best for their learners.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-139-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Karen Whalen, University of Florida; (Speaker) Nancy Borja-Hart, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Chelsea Renfro, The University of Tennessee

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Teacher of the Year Luncheon

By Invitation Only

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Women Faculty SIG: Luncheon and Business Meeting

Administrative and Financial Officers Special Interest Group, Administrative Services Section, Continuing Professional Development Section

Crystal B ( Lobby Level, West Tower)

The 2019 Women Faculty SIG business luncheon programming will include a facilitated discussion of the book club disseminated at the 2018 annual luncheon: Tripping the Prom Queen- The Truth About Women and Rivalry by Susan Shapiro Barash. Dr. Diane Ginsburg will share her reflections and implications as it relates to women faculty in the academy. Additionally, our mentor program task force will provide an overview of the mentor program set to launch following the annual meeting.

(Speaker) Seena L. Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Jenny A. Van Amburgh, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Tonja M. Woods, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Jean Y. Moon, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Diane B. Ginsburg, The University of Texas at Austin

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

PCAT Prep Advisory Committee Meeting

Closed Meeting

Monroe Boardroom 4 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Mary L. Euler, West Virginia University

1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Demonstration of an Interprofessional Escape Room Activity

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This activity will use educational escape-room techniques and puzzles to demonstrate and simulate an interprofessional experience. The intended audience are faculty members involved in interprofessional education, or are interested in learning how to incorporate escape rooms and puzzle solving into their teaching. Expect active learning, team building, and an interactive experience! Concepts from this session could be adapted for other educational purposes.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge from simulation to describe the components of a successful interprofessional escape room activity.
  2. Identify barriers and opportunities to implement an interprofessional escape room.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-044-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Benjamin Chavez, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Eric H. Gilliam, University of Colorado

1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Educational Gaming as an Active Learning Approach for Teaching Social Determinants of Health

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group, Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

A foundational understanding of social determinants of health is vital in order to meet the objectives of many, if not all, of Domains 2 and 3 of the CAPE outcomes. Gaming as an active learning strategy engages the learner in a fun and interactive experience. This mini-session will walk the audience through a board game geared toward learning social determinants of health and health disparities, as well as developing empathy for people from different backgrounds.

(Speaker) Chamika Hawkins-Taylor, South Dakota State University; (Speaker) Brittney A. Meyer, South Dakota State University

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Move Out of ‘Z’ Way, Millennials - Connecting With Gen Z & Implementing a “Huddle Culture” to Promote Organizational Health and an Informed, Cohesive, Academic Work Environment

Pharmacy Practice Section, Experiential Education Section, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group / Administrative Services Section, Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

“What’s with kids these days?”- stated every prior generation. Generation Z (Gen Z) students, born after 1995, will soon become the predominant generation within pharmacy education. While Gen Z has similarities to Millennials, there are also many differences which pharmacy faculty can harness to enhance the development of this future generation of pharmacists. This program will discuss Gen Z and ways pharmacy faculty can employ best-teaching practices within the classroom and experiential settings. / [SECOND SESSION] Culture can be defined as a set of shared experiences and values; but how do we remain connected, focused and accountable to one another when daily distractions get in the way? A “Huddle Culture” promotes organizational health leading to high functioning and united teams, increasing effectiveness and efficiency. A “Huddle Culture” fosters relational coordination, alignment, and support from key players providing an injection of energy to carry teams through the day.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast Millennials and Gen Z students.
  2. Describe educational techniques to enhance teaching and learning for Gen Z.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-045-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Wendy Duncan, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Alex N. Isaacs, Purdue University; (Speaker) Sarah A. Nisly, Wingate Univesity 

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Keep-Start-Stop: A Structured Model for Effective Student Feedback

Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This session describes the foundations for and implementation of a brief structured feedback model, Keep-Start-Stop, at multiple institutions. Through the experience of an international collaboration, we address how instructors and students provide and receive feedback across the curricula and at the individual course level. Pharmacy educators will gain experience with a standardized approach that encourage students and faculty improve the quality and frequency of feedback for multiple activities.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how a structured feedback model can be implemented in various areas of the curricula.
  2. Discuss current education activities and propose methods to implement the structured feedback model within the pharmacy curricula.
  3. Demonstrate how a structured feedback model can be used to improve student feedback.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-046-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Vivienne Mak, Monash University; (Speaker) Mikael D. Jones, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) Clark Kebodeaux, University of Kentucky

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Fostering Innovation in Your CPE Program: Best Practices Workshop for CPE Administrators by CPE Administrators

Continuing Professional Development Section

Randolph 2 (Concourse Level, West Tower)

The purpose of this session is to provide a venue for members of schools and colleges of pharmacy to discuss pertinent issues related to continuing pharmacy education (CPE) and continuing professional development (CPD) in the context of CPE. The target audience includes members of the CPD section, including individuals who are involved with or interested in CPE operations within schools and colleges of pharmacy.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify opportunities for leveraging technology in CPE activities
  2. Discuss examples of fostering and disseminating quality improvement through CPE activities.
  3. Develop a preliminary plan for using technology-based learning enhancements in the attendee's organization.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-047-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Peter J. Hughes, Samford University; (Speaker) Barbara L. Jolly, Sullivan University; (Speaker) James Wheeler, The University of Tennessee

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Cosmeceuticals: Regulation, Safety and Toxicity

Chemistry Section, Pharmaceutics Section, Biological Sciences Section

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

There is increasing evidence that some chemicals in cosmeceuticals act transdermally rather than topically leading to safety and toxicity concerns. This presentation will discuss the current regulatory status of chemicals used in cosmeceuticals and provide evidence of adverse health effects with chemical accumulation in specific locations throughout the body. Pharmacists are responsible for interpreting product label information to identify potential free radical generators, antioxidants, and/or other chemical entities that can interfere or reverse the effect of existing drug therapies. Suggested resources to guide informed product selection for personal use and patient interactions will be provided.

(Speaker) Susan L. Mercer, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

The Eleven Habits of Highly Effective Preceptors: Elevating Pharmacy Precepting

Experiential Education Section, Continuing Professional Development Section, Assessment Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

The Habits of Preceptors Rubric (HOP-R), its premise, and the consensus-driven process used for development will be presented. Participants will self-assess on select habits within the rubric and create a plan for continuing professional development. Additionally, attendees will evaluate their current preceptor assessment strategies and consider ways to enhance the impact of their current approach at their institutions. The target audience for this session is experiential education faculty and staff, and preceptors of students and residents.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the history and development of the Habits of Preceptors Rubric (HOP-R).
  2. Explain the concept of “Habits of Preceptors” in terms of its goals to improve preceptor skills and learning outcomes.
  3. Utilize the HOP-R to self or peer assess precepting habits .

Application-based (0581-0000-19-048-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Lindsay E. Davis, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Alison M. Stevens, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Suzanne Larson, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Gloria Grice, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Tara Storjohann, Midwestern University/Glendale

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Incorporating Drug Shortages Using a Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning Method in Drug Information & AARDVARC: The Automated Approach to Reviewing and Developing Valuable Assessment Resources for Your Curriculum

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Library and Information Science Section, Pharmacy Practice Section/ Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Drug shortages are a significant public health issue impacting the medication supply chain, health care providers, and patient care. Creatively threading this topic in a course employing health information retrieval skills can better equip students to problem-solve and enhance decision-making skills as pharmacists. This mini-session will highlight an example of integrating the topic of drug shortages in a drug information course using the process oriented guided inquiry learning method. / [SECOND SESSION] With increased demands and limited time and resources, a critical need has developed for faculty and administrators to find quick and efficient ways in which to assess their academic programs. We will describe and demonstrate the use of AARDVARC, an innovative web-based solution created at the University of Southern California to manage and centralize syllabi, improve curricular and programmatic assessment, address faculty workloads, enhance reporting, and improve the overall efficiency of academic and business operations. Target audience: Individuals responsible for curriculum, assessment, and faculty affairs.

(Speaker) Krisy-Ann Thornby, Palm Beach Atlantic University/ (Speaker) Maryann Wu, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Ian S. Haworth, University of Southern California

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Faculty to Faculty Mentoring: It Is Not "One Size Fits All"

Pharmacy Practice Section, Continuing Professional Development Section, Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Crystal B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Mentoring is a crucial part of faculty life. Through mentoring, faculty can influence all areas of performance and success. However, there are many different mentoring structures. A review of various structures including pros and cons and barriers to mentorship will be discussed. During the session, findings from a survey of the Pharmacy Practice Section related to mentoring will be shared. Discussion regarding best practices for mentoring of early and mid-career faculty will be encouraged.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the needs for mentoring throughout a career in academia.
  2. Describe various academic mentoring models.
  3. Develop a mentoring plan for a department or school.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-049-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Leslie A. Hamilton, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Sally L. Haack, Drake University; (Speaker) Emmeline Tran, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Lea S. Eiland, Auburn University; (Speaker) Karen F. Marlowe, Auburn University; (Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Understanding Student Stress in Colleges of Pharmacy

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Pharmaceutics Section

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Stress in pharmacy students can negatively affect their academic performance and health. According to ACPE Standards 2016, measurement and evaluation of stress in students, faculty and staff for its impact on programmatic outcomes and morale is encouraged. This session will provide an overview of the perception of stress experienced by pharmacy students in 3-year and 4 year programs. In addition, the relationship between stress, satisfaction and professionalism will also be discussed.

(Speaker) Surajit Dey, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Mark A. Munger, The University of Utah; (Moderator) Anita T. Mosley, University of the Incarnate Word

1:00 p.m.– 2:00 p.m.

Strategies and Tools to Engage Patients as Partners in the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process

Social and Administrative Sciences Section, Pharmacy Practice Section, Experiential Education Section

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session will offer views of the JCPP Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process from patient and caregiver perspectives. Practical approaches to engage patients and caregivers in shared decision-making to optimize medication adherence and outcomes will be discussed. Audience members will have the opportunity to evaluate these approaches and consider implementation in their teaching, research, and service. The target audience for this session is members of the Social and Administrative Sciences, Pharmacy Practice, and Experiential Education Sections.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the value in improved health outcomes when engaging patients and caregivers as partners in medication management.
  2. Recommend key strategic approaches and tools in implementing the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process from a patient’s perspective.
  3. Describe the medication experience as a social phenomenon, in addition to a clinical one.
  4. Discuss the utility of a patient engagement tool in helping pharmacists collect, assess, and address patients’ medication adherence barriers.
  5. Describe three methods of tailored patient education to improve patient engagement, functional health literacy, and medication adherence.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-050-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Pat Merryweather, Project Patient Care; (Speaker) Jon C. Schommer, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Jamie C. Barner, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences; (Moderator) Lourdes G. Planas, The University of Oklahoma

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Overcoming Barriers to Delivering Quality Cultural Competency Training in Pharmacy Curricula

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

How do we know that our cultural competency training in the pharmacy curriculum is working? Faculty often encounter a range of barriers when delivering cultural competency training, including creating quality activities, navigating skills training, and ensuring that learning outcomes are assessed in a meaningful manner. This session will assist faculty with developing strategies that can be tailored to their unique curricula by addressing common barriers and presenting potential solutions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe various active learning activities that can be utilized to teach cultural competence (CC) concepts effectively and efficiently.
  2. Develop strategies to provide skills training for CC, including but not limited to training faculty, preceptors, and students through integrative techniques such as using standardized patients.
  3. Evaluate appropriate methods to assess student knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors gained from CC training.
  4. Develop a plan to address barriers in teaching and assessing CC concepts.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-051-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Sally Arif, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Imbi Drame, Howard University; (Speaker) Aleda M. Chen, Cedarville University; (Moderator) Nancy Borja-Hart, The University of Tennessee

2:15 p.m.– 2:45 p.m.

A Telehealth Model for the Delivery of Interprofessional Education

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session will present an innovative model for the delivery of a longitudinal interprofessional education (IPE) curriculum utilizing telehealth principles. The session will highlight challenges in providing IPE on campuses which do not have all representative health professions and will describe a complementary strategy for IPE delivery. A longitudinal, multi-state telehealth IPE utilizing electronic health records, video-conferencing tools, and recorded patient history and physical examinations will be described. Assessment strategies will also be described.

At the completion of this session, the participant will be able to:

  1. Provide an overview of telehealth in the setting on IPE.
  2. Describe the implementation of a telehealth IPE which includes students from various geographical locations in the country.
  3. Describe various technologies that can be used to simulate patient care delivery within a telehealth context.
  4. Discuss assessment strategies to ensure student learning within a telehealth model.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-052-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Deepti Vyas, University of the Pacific

2:15 p.m.– 2:45 p.m.

Game On! Incorporating Gamification Into a Pharmaceutical Skills Lab Course to Enhance Retention and Encourage Self-Directed Learning

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Continuing Professional Development Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Gamification is an innovative approach to learning that challenges and motivates students (both extrinsically and intrinsically) to become more actively involved in their own learning. This session will review the development, implementation, and assessment of gamification in a Pharmaceutical Skills lab course. Speakers will share their experience with this approach and how participants can implement this at their institution.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Review the role of gamification in pharmacy education.
  2. Discuss ways to incorporate gamification principles into your course(s).

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-053-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Melissa Ruble, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Jaclyn Cole, University of South Florida

2:15 p.m.– 3:15 p.m.

Administrative Services Section: Business Meeting

Administrative Services Section

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

(Chair) Heather M. W. Petrelli, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Rebecca H. Brierley, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Biological Sciences Section: Business Meeting

Biological Sciences Section, Pharmaceutics Section, Chemistry Section

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

A meeting of the section that will update members on activities of the past year and planned activities for the coming year. Committee reports will be presented and items relevant to the business of the section will be discussed and voted on.

(Chair) Lauren A. O'Donnell, Duquesne University; (Speaker) Daniel R. Kennedy, Western New England University

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Chemistry Section: Business Meeting

Chemistry Section

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Annual business meeting for the Chemistry Section.

(Chair) Susan L. Mercer, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Hoang V Le, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) David C. Stevens, The University of Mississippi

2:15 p.m.– 3:15 p.m.

Continuing Professional Development Section: Business Meeting

Continuing Professional Development Section

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

(Chair) Peter J. Hughes, Samford University; (Speaker) James Wheeler, The University of Tennessee

2:15 p.m.– 3:15 p.m.

Experiential Education Section: Business Meeting

Experiential Education Section

Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Business meeting for all members of the Experiential Education Section and anyone interested in experiential education.

(Chair) Maryann Z. Skrabal, Creighton University

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Business Meeting

Library and Information Science Section

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Annual business meeting for the Library and Information Science Section.

(Chair) Vern Duba, The University of Iowa

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Pharmaceutics Section: Business Meeting

Pharmaceutics Section

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Melgardt M. de Villiers, University of Wisconsin-Madison

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: Business Meeting

Pharmacy Practice Section

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

(Speaker) Paul O Gubbins, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Adam Pate, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Leslie A. Hamilton, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Lakesha M. Butler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

2:15 p.m.– 3:15 p.m.

Social and Administrative Sciences Section: Business Meeting

Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This session will be used to conduct the business of the Social and Administrative Sciences Section. Section leadership and committees will provide updates of recent activities. Graduate students, Pharm.D. students, fellows, residents, and new faculty will be introduced. Section awardees will be recognized. New Section officers will be installed and future directions of the Section will be discussed.

(Speaker) Pamela C. Heaton, University of Cincinnati

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Developing and Implementing Effective Strategic Plans: Transforming Hope and Expectations Into Successful Outcomes

Administrative Services Section, Assessment Special Interest Group, Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Crystal A (Lobby Level, West Tower)

Few processes have greater potential to increase the effectiveness of a school/college of pharmacy than does Strategic Planning. Yet many strategic planning efforts fall far short of this. How can we realize Strategic Planning's potential? This session integrates current thinking, best practices, and real-world experiences from a diverse array of institutions to generate a practical, contemporary template for strategic plan development and implementation by schools/colleges of pharmacy.

(Speaker) Jeanine K. Mount, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) John R. Reynolds, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University; (Speaker) Linda G. MacLean, Washington State University; (Speaker) J. Gregory Boyer, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Therapeutic Decision-Making: How Do We (and How Should We) Think About Treatment?

Pharmacy Practice Section, Social and Administrative Sciences Section, Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Crystal C (Lobby Level, West Tower)

The cognitive process of clinical decision-making is the key differentiating skill of healthcare professionals, but the vast majority of studies focus on the diagnostic component of this process, where insights gained from theoretical and empiric study have aided in design of medical education. This session discusses empiric and theory-based studies of therapeutic decision-making and implications for instruction and practice. The target audience includes clinical instructors, instructional designers, curriculum developers, and assessment-focused faculty.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Differentiate between reasoning and judgment in the four-step model of therapeutic decision-making.
  2. Discuss the evidence for and against applying the three models of reasoning derived from the diagnostics literature to therapeutics
  3. Explain how scaffolding can be used to assist students in mastering the processes of therapeutic decision-making.
  4. Counsel a learner on approaches to optimize delivery of their therapeutic recommendations in an interprofessional care environment.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-055-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Dan Wright, University of Otago School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Conan MacDougall, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Tina Brock, Monash University; (Speaker) Zubin H. Austin, University of Toronto; (Speaker) Megan Anakin, University of Otago

2:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Development Directors SIG: Business Meeting

Development Directors Special Interest Group

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Kori Caldwell, Auburn University

3:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Exhibitors’ Opening Reception and Research/Education Poster Session I

Riverside Exhibit Hall (Exhibit Level, East Tower)

Hungry for information on the latest products and services to support your work? Have a thirst for new knowledge about research and education? Join the exhibitors for hors d'oeuvres and refreshments, and they’ll fill you in on new tools. From 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m., chat with peers about their posters.

3:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

New Investigator Award Poster Session

Riverside Exhibit Hall (Exhibit Level, East Tower)

Interested in learning about research funded by the AACP New Investigator Award? Join the 2017-2018 NIA recipients from 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. as they talk about their NIA experiences and present the results of their research.

3:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Trainee Poster Competition

Riverside Exhibit Hall (Exhibit Level, East Tower)

Visit the posters of student pharmacists, graduate students, residents, fellows and postdocs. From 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m., they'll be at their posters to present their research and scholarship.

6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Past Presidents Dinner

By Invitation Only

Off Property - Tortoise Supper Club

AACP past presidents dinner hosted by Immediate Past President Dr. Steven Scott of Purdue University.

6:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

AACP Walmart Scholars Welcome Reception

By Invitation Only

Crystal C (Lobby Level, West Tower)

Current Walmart Scholars and mentors are invited to join us for an informal reception. The event will serve an excellent opportunity for Scholars to network with each other, seek advice from mentors across the academy, expand their knowledge about academic careers, and enhance their professional growth.

Monday

All Day

Meet the Editor

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education? Or signing up to be a manuscript reviewer? Do you have a question about AJPE? Stop by and meet the editor, associate editors and editorial staff of AJPE. We'll be here during breakfast and beverage break times!

(Chair) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University

6:30 a.m.–7:30 a.m.

AM Fitness Program

Plaza Ballroom, (Lobby Level, East Tower)

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Special Interest Group (SIG) Cabinet Meeting

Crystal A (Lobby Level, West Tower)

The chairs, chairs-elect and immediate past chairs will meet to discuss the business of the AACP Special Interest Groups.

(Moderator) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Private School Deans Breakfast

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

By invitation only. Gather your colleagues to discuss ideas and information related to private schools of pharmacy.

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

NACDS Foundation Breakfast Connection 

Crystal B, Lobby Level, West Tower

By Invitation Only

7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2019 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Networking Room 1 of 3

Monroe Boardroom 1 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Want to catch up with old friends, meet new ones or discuss similar interests? Want to continue the discussion from a fantastic session? Come to the Networking Rooms or schedule time at the AACP Registration and Help Desk.

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Networking Room 2 of 3

Monroe Boardroom 2 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Networking Room 3 of 3

Monroe Boardroom 3 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Meditation Room

Grand Suite 2B (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 2

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app.

(Moderator) Steven C. Stoner, University of Missouri-Kansas City

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Differential Diagnosis in the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process: Meeting the Need for Primary Care

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Differential diagnosis is the process of distinguishing a particular condition from others that present similarly and helps guide pharmacotherapy decision-making. The application of differential diagnosis will allow pharmacists to more comprehensively meet the demands for primary care services in the U.S. This program is intended for pharmacy educators and clinicians and will introduce differential diagnosis, its applicability to pharmacy practice, and propose a method for curricular implementation.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the relevance of differential diagnosis in pharmacy education and practice.
  2. Describe how differential diagnosis is practically applied in pharmacy practice and how it relates to the JCPP Pharmacists' Patient Care Process.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-056-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Mandy M. Jones, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Nicholas Nelson, University of Kentucky

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

The Suicide Epidemic: It’s Time for Pharmacy to Take Action

Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group, Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription medicine Special Interest Group, Continuing Professional Development Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Suicide claims the life of 1 person every 12 minutes and is the second leading cause of death for individuals aged 15-34 years. Suicide and mental illness is non-discriminating; affecting all individuals including student pharmacists. In 2017 Washington became the first state to require pharmacists to complete a suicide awareness and prevention training. This session will describe the suicide prevention and awareness pharmacist training program, implementation of the program into the curriculum and evaluation of the program.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the incorporation of suicide awareness and prevention into the curriculum.
  2. Discuss impacts and needs of suicide awareness training for student pharmacists.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-057-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Megan Willson, Washington State University; (Speaker) Christina R. Buchman, Washington State University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Beyond Resiliency: Optimizing Person-Job Fit to Prevent Burnout Among Faculty and Students

Continuing Professional Development Section, Pharmacy Practice Section, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Burnout is often the result of a mismatch between an individual and his/her job. Despite research suggesting that the causes of burnout are usually organizational in nature, most interventions focus on helping individuals cope with job-related stressors, which may explain why the effects of these strategies have limited impact. In this session, we will explore ways in which faculty and students can prevent burnout by addressing several critical domains of person-job fit.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain the role of person-job fit in determining job engagement and burnout.
  2. List strategies for preventing person-job mismatch among faculty and student pharmacists.
  3. Analyze one's current job for areas of mismatch and opportunities for job redesign. 
  4. Formulate strategies to optimize person-job using principles of job redesign.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-137-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Brent N. Reed, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Stuart T. Haines, The University of Mississippi

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Community Competency: Expanding Our Worldview

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group, Public Health Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

While understanding health disparities and cultural competency help to develop knowledge and skills for working across diverse cultures, "community competency" provides a framework to explore the history, geography, culture, and context which shape the communities that pharmacists serve. This session will explore the concept of community competency and provide examples of how faculty can integrate community competency into pharmacy coursework and experiences. Examples of how community competency has been integrated into didactic courses and experiential study away programs will be shared.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Examine community competency as an educational framework for learning and working across diverse cultures and communities.
  2. Explore opportunities for faculty to integrate community competency into their own pharmacy coursework and experiences.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-058-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jeri J. Sias, The University of Texas at El Paso; (Speaker) Amanda M. Loya, The University of Texas at El Paso; (Speaker) Robert L. Emerson, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Tamara McCants, Howard University; (Speaker) Beau Stubblefield-Tave, Center for Culturally-Fluent Leadership

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Creative Collisions: Uniting Basic and Clinical Worlds to Problem-Solve Patient Cases Using the PPCP

Pharmaceutics Section, Pharmacy Practice Section, Biological Sciences Section

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Intended for faculty from all pharmacy disciplines, this session will focus on elaborating how faculty from the clinical and basic sciences can unite to create and use patient cases for interdisciplinary integration and clinical problem solving. The speakers will describe the development of cases and exercises, ranging from those in a single course to those that spiral through several courses to enable their integration. Audience members will participate in idea sharing through case development.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe approaches for faculty from the basic and clinical disciplines to work together to achieve the common goal of interdisciplinary integration.
  2. Describe how patient cases and case-based problem solving provide a source of common ground for the application of curricular knowledge, while enabling the faculty to operate within his or her disciplinary comfort zone.
  3. Learn to select or to write patient cases based on nature of the curricular topics to be integrated.
  4. Participate in the development of an interdisciplinary case.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-059-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Catherine J. Cone, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) William C. Mobley, University of Florida; (Moderator) Anita T. Mosley, University of the Incarnate Word

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Sharing Self-Caring: Interprofessional Self-Care Education by Healthcare Student

Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription medicine Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section, Pharmacy Practice Section

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This program will describe two approaches to student pharmacists providing interprofessional education on self-care to medical students. One approach involves APPE student pharmacists, guided by faculty, providing OTC drug education to third year medical students in two venues (an OTC drugs workshop and a Family Medicine rotation elective training experience). The second approach (developed by a pharmacist and a physician) involves student pharmacists educating medical students about diabetes self-care management through an interactive workshop.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the importance of collaborative education about self-care among a variety of healthcare disciplines.
  2. Describe innovative approaches for providing interprofessional education to a variety of healthcare provider student colleagues.
  3. Demonstrate active learning tools used in providing interprofessional education to a variety of healthcare student colleagues.
  4. Discuss the impact of interprofessional education activities involving a variety of healthcare student colleagues.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-133-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Rupal Mansukhani, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; (Speaker) Louise S. Parent-Stevens, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Marlowe D. Kachlic, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Moderator) Jennifer A. Wilson, Wingate University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Successful Attributes of Interprofessional Education in Substance Use Disorder

Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group, Public Health Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session brings together the Substance Use Disorder SIG and the Interprofessional Education Community to present a variety of Interprofessional (IP) activities that have been successful in educating and engaging student pharmacists in Substance Use Disorder (SUD) learning to address a key gap in many pharmacy curricula. This session will use both traditional and active learning methods to gather attendee expertise, highlighting attributes of successful IP education focused on SUD learning.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe ten attributes of successful interprofessional education and apply these attributes to interprofessional education focusing on substance use disorders.
  2. Summarize ways that IP learning can be incorporated into classroom and experiential learning opportunities of various lengths that focus on substance use disorder.
  3. Develop a substance use disorder focused IP learning activity that capitalizes on the strengths of an individual institution, community, or culture.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-060-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Chair and Speaker) Tran Tran, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Andrew J. Muzyk, Campbell University; (Speaker) Gina M. Baugh, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Laura C. Palombi, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Lucas G.Hill, The University of Texas at Austin

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Special Session: Reports of the 2018-2019 Standing Committees

Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

The session provides interested attendees an opportunity to interact with the standing committees: Academic Affairs, Argus Commission, Professional Affairs, Research and Graduate Affairs, Strategic Engagement, and Student Affairs. Following brief presentations by committee chairs on the key recommendations contained in the report, discussions on the reports and implementation strategies will be led by committee members.

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Council of Deans (COD) Networking Session #1: How are Colleges and Schools Changing the Portrait of Pharmacists and Pharmacy Careers?

Administrative Services Section, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This session will discuss the programs, resources, tools and other avenues that colleges and schools of pharmacy are using and developing to reframe how pharmacists and their career options are communicated to potential student pharmacists, their families, and other stakeholder groups. Ideas that may address this topic are also welcome! A summary of the issues and themes discussed during this session will be shared at the Council of Deans Business Meeting, scheduled for Monday afternoon.

(Moderator) Henry J. Mann, The Ohio State University; (Moderator) Mark A. Munger, The University of Utah

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Council of Deans (COD) Networking Session #2: Beyond Graduating Student Pharmacists, How are Colleges and Schools Leading Initiatives to Advance Community-Based Pharmacy Practice?

Pharmacy Practice Section, Social and Administrative Sciences Section, Experiential Education Section

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This session will discuss the programs, resources, tools and other avenues that colleges and schools of pharmacy are using and developing to advance community-based pharmacy practice. Ideas that may address this topic are also welcome! A summary of the issues and themes discussed during this session will be shared at the Council of Deans Business Meeting, scheduled for Monday afternoon.

(Moderator) Trish R. Freeman, University of Kentucky; (Moderator) Ronald P. Jordan, Chapman University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Council of Deans (COD) Networking Session #3: Health Care Transformation: How are Colleges and Schools Addressing Population Health?

Pharmacy Practice Section, Public Health Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This session will focus on strategies, programs, curricula and other avenues that colleges and schools of pharmacy are utilizing or developing to address population health issues. Ideas that may address this topic are also welcome! A summary of the issues and themes discussed during this session will be shared at the Council of Deans Business Meeting, scheduled for Monday afternoon.

(Moderator) Michael D. Hogue, Loma Linda University; (Moderator) Steven J. Martin, Ohio Northern University

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grant Award Microsessions

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Toronto (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Recipients of the 2018 Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grant share 10 minute summaries of their SOTL projects.

(Speaker) Courtney L. Bradley, High Point University; (Speaker) Monique L. Mounce, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) James J. Nawarskas, The University of New Mexico; (Speaker) Lydia C. Newsom, Mercer University; (Speaker) Jonathan Newsome, The University of Texas at Tyler; (Speaker) Kristen Pate, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Andrew Straw, Cedarville University; (Moderator) Therese I. Poirier, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect 

Grand Suite 5 (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Taking care of business sometimes requires taking care of yourself in the process. AACP is making it easy with the PharmCAS R&R Lounge—designed to offer attendees a brief but much-needed respite from crowds, noise and other common meeting stresses, while keeping you fresh for the business of learning and networking. Kick up your feet, check your e-mail, charge your phone, tablet or laptop and unwind. There will be four laptop kiosks available on a first-come, first-served basis. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment. With support from our sponsor, PharmCAS, powered by Liaison, the lounge services are complimentary so make time to stop by for a little R&R!

9:00 a.m.- 9:30 a.m.

Identifying Resilience in Pharmacy Students – What If You Don’t Find It?

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section

Columbus CDEF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

The concept of resiliency, or the ability to “bounce back” after a challenging situation, is gaining attention from employers and academic institutions. Measuring resilience can be somewhat subjective, and for many, becoming resilient is a personal journey. There is also literature that indicates resiliency cannot be learned. This program will discuss individual student cases of resilience, and provide tips for how pharmacy programs can integrate strategies for developing, and teaching, resilience.

(Speaker) Megan E. Thompson, University of Colorado

9:00 a.m.- 9:30 a.m.

Orientation Re-Envisioned: Preparing for School and Career Using the PPCP

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Orientation is an opportunity to engage and excite students about the profession. With a focus on the roles pharmacists play in healthcare and the PCPP, students begin their journey focusing on patients and the importance of advocacy, leadership, and interprofessional teamwork. This novel approach orients students to the profession and a curricula built around the PPCP. The session will share our school’s orientation redesign process through backward design as well as two years of outcomes.

(Speaker) Karen F. Marlowe, Auburn University; (Speaker) Bradley Wright, Auburn University

9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Research/Education Poster Session II

Name Badge Required

Riverside Exhibit Hall (Exhibit Level, East Tower)

Poster presenters will be at their posters from 9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

NACDS Foundation Research Row

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Spouse/Guests Hospitality Room - July 15

Grand Suite 1 (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Charting Your Own Course: Finding Yourself and Finding Your Path in Academia

Pharmacy Practice Section, Women Faculty Special Interest Group, Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Utilizing concepts explored within Kate Woodthorpe’s book Survive and Thrive in Academia, participants will engage in constructing a framework for examining the components that define a successful and balanced academic career. Individuals will reflect on their teaching, research, service, leadership and personal experiences to answer the question of what type of teacher, practitioner, and scholar they want to be. Speakers will provide the audience with tools promoting self-authorship, personal authenticity, self-advocacy, and strategies for success.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Examine and reflect on their teaching, research, leadership, service, and personal experiences.
  2. Describe the type of faculty member/practitioner/person you want to be along the areas of teaching, research, service, leadership, and personal life.
  3. Determine a process for identifying, developing, and implementing a 1-4 year plan to achieve your personal and professional goals.
  4. Identify ways to take responsibility and advocate for your career and its development and life outside of work to combat the components of burnout (overwork, exhaustion, stress).
  5. Create a list of people who appropriately challenge and support your personal and professional development (peers, mentors, and supervisors).

Application-based (0581-0000-19-062-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Lisa M. Meny, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Evidence-Based Interventions to Promote Learner Interest and Motivation: Indications, MOA, Administration, and Monitoring

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session will de-mystify the emerging research regarding learner motivation and interest. We will explore several evidence-based interventions that increase learner motivation and interest including addressing student identity misalignments, creating belonging, modeling enthusiasm, and more. Using a pharmacy metaphor, we will examine the indications, mechanism of action, administration, and monitoring of these interventions to make the theory more digestible. You will leave with ready-to-implement ideas to promote your learner’s interest and motivation.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how addressing student identity misalignments, creating belonging, and modeling enthusiasm increase student interest and motivation.
  2. Compare and contrast the indications, MOA, administration, and monitoring for evidence-based motivation interventions.
  3. Apply motivation interventions to one’s own teaching and learning environment.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-063-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kayley M. Lyons, Monash University; (Speaker) Stuart T. Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Improving Pharmacy Education Through Creation of a Nationwide Educational Collaborative: The Example of Antimicrobial Stewardship

Public Health Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Pharmacists play a key role in combating the rise of antimicrobial resistance by practicing antimicrobial stewardship (AS) across all settings and levels of training. A collaboration of AACP Public Health SIG, SIDP, and ID-EN, this session describes the formation of a national group dedicated to determining educational needs, sharing teaching resources and best practices, and developing research collaborations. The target audience includes educators interested in developing large-scale collaborations, curriculum developers, and teachers of AS.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the impact of antimicrobial stewardship (AS) on public health, recent governmental and regulatory mandates for AS, and the role that pharmacists are specified to have by these organizations.
  2. Review three key factors in performing a national survey and recruiting participants into an educational collaborative.
  3. Describe classroom-based and practice-based educational innovations in AS and assess how these innovations might be implemented or adapted in your local curriculum.
  4. Propose initial steps for establishment of an educational collaborative for a different area of pharmacy specialty practice.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-064-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Jonathan Thigpen, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Conan MacDougall, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Navaneeth (Nav) Narayanan, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; (Speaker) Zachary N. Jenkins, Cedarville University; (Speaker) Amber Giles, Presbyterian College

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Use It or Lose It: Initiatives to Improve the Utility of Exams

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Assessment is a critical component of health professions education and is responsible for high stakes decisions for learners throughout the curriculum. Often educators have little training on item development and optimal use of exam scores, which leads to a decline in test quality and utility. This session will describe faculty development experiences that addressed two challenges: (1) how to minimize item writing flaws in multiple-choice questions and (2) how to establish pass/fail scores on exams through a standard setting process.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe faculty development initiatives to minimize common item writing flaws in multiple choice examinations.
  2. Identify methods that can be used for standard setting of examinations.
  3. Apply instruments to identify item writing flaws and apply strategies to set exam cut-scores.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-065-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jaekyu Shin, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Katherine Gruenberg, University of California, San Francisco

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Using the Arts and Humanities to Develop and Enhance Student Communication Skills and Empathy

Pharmacy Practice Section, Public Health Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Communication in all its forms, including empathy and clinical observation, is vital to any human experience, particularly in education and healthcare. The arts and humanities offer useful ways to learn about, develop, practice, and hone these skills. This program will describe and demonstrate how theater, art, film, and literature can give student pharmacists the opportunity to develop and practice empathetic communication skills and demonstrate the value of transferring those skills to other settings and interactions.

(Speaker) Vibhuti Arya, St. John's University; (Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Akash J. Alexander, Long Island University; (Speaker) Jaclyn Novatt, Long Island University; (Speaker) Susan M. Meyer, University of Pittsburgh; (Moderator) Paul L. Ranelli, University of Minnesota

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Where Have All the Applicants Gone?: Using an Early Assurance Program to Create a Pipeline of Competitive Applicants

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

In recent years, applicants to schools and colleges of Pharmacy across the U.S. have been in decline. It is vital that institutions find a way to fill their classes without compromising admission standards. Oregon State University and the University of New Mexico have expanded and bolstered their Early Assurance Program (EAP) to maintain a steady pipeline from institutions throughout their respective states. While in EAP, students receive one-on-one advising, engage in co-curricular activities, maintain a competitive GPA, and complete healthcare experience prior to matriculating into the Pharm.D. program. Students in these programs gain insights into the Pharm.D. program, while also creating applicants focused on the specific school.

(Speaker) Lauren Corwin, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Krystal Ward, The University of New Mexico

9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

RiteAid Headshot Cafe

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Keeping Track and Showing Transparency in Assigning Didactic Teaching Hours in a Pharmacy Curriculum

Administrative Services Section, Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Are you a faculty member always wondering if your teaching hours are the same as everyone else? Perhaps you are an administrator having difficulties keeping track and verifying all the hours your faculty teach yearly. If so, come join us! We will share an Excel tool we developed that allows us to keep track of hours (i.e., didactic, support) and how our department collaboratively work updating and maintaining accuracy/transparency from year to year.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe steps to show transparency when assigning teaching hours by working collaboratively with faculty.
  2. Use a tool to assign and maintain accuracy of department teaching hours.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-066-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jordan Sedlacek, Larkin University; (Speaker) Joshua Caballero, Larkin University

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Pharmacotherapy Scholars Program: Intensive Longitudinal Training to Enhance Post-Graduate Readiness

Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

The Pharmacotherapy Scholars Program (PSP) is an intensive training experience integrated into the Pharm.D. curriculum at the University of Pittsburgh. The PSP prepares P4 students to become highly proficient in direct patient care roles and successfully match into post-graduate year 1 (PGY1) programs. The PSP integrates synchronous APPEs with personal advising, team-based mentoring, peer-to-peer learning, longitudinal research, and professional development. Target audience will include faculty involved in curriculum and pharmacy practice.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Outline a curricular integrated, post-graduate training program designed to prepare students for securing a PGY-1 residency program in a highly competitive environment
  2. Examine the educational impact, curricular utility, feasibility, and generalizability of the program.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-067-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Amy L. Seybert, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Neal J. Benedict, University of Pittsburgh

10:30 a.m.–Noon

Science Plenary: Precision Medicine – The Future is NOW: Evidence, Practice and Educating the Future Workforce to Lead

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Pharmacists are increasingly being called upon to serve as leaders and change agents to implement precision medicine in practice, particularly in the area of pharmacogenomics. The 2017‐2018 Argus Commission Report includes recommendations that colleges and schools of pharmacy accelerate integration of genomics into the Pharm.D. and graduate curricula and identify experts in pharmacogenomics to help advance education, research, and practice. However, practice‐ and evidence‐based educational standards, resources, and training programs to prepare future pharmacists to implement precision medicine remain limited. This session will provide an overview of the current science and practice in precision medicine and identify education and training needs and strategies to prepare the future pharmacy workforce for a leadership role in precision medicine implementation.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss recent advances, current challenges, and future directions in precision medicine.
  2. Describe the role of the pharmacist in implementing pharmacogenomics and precision medicine.
  3. Summarize key needs, challenges, and educational strategies for precision medicine in the profession of pharmacy.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-138-L04-P 0.75 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Todd D. Sorensen, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Kristin Wiisanen, University of Florida; (Speaker) Julie A. Johnson, University of Florida

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Students Tracking Their Way to Success: The Use of Productive Study-Time Logs

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Have you wondered what students are doing to promote academic success? When your students say they study “all the time”, what do they mean? Come learn about the use of online productive study time logs (PSTL) within an institution. Information targeted towards College of Pharmacy faculty will be presented on time allocation and activities likely to generate academic success. This information can provide guidance on how to promote academic success and balance for pharmacy students.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the use of productive study time logs in higher education.
  2. Identify student time allocations or study techniques that promote academic success in integrated pharmacotherapy courses.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-068-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator and Speaker) Zachary A. Weber, Purdue University; (Speaker) Alex N. Isaacs, Purdue University

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

The Logic in Logic Modeling! Design and Evaluate Your Activities, Courses, and Curricula With Purpose

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section, Assessment Special Interest Group

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This mini-session will provide attendees with interest in course design hands-on experience using logic models, which are visual tools linking elements of instructional design to desired program outcomes. Logic models facilitate strategic planning for course and activity design to diagnose problems and identify solutions that improve student learning. Presenters will give a orientation to logic models, followed by a contextual example of how logic modeling was applied to develop and assess a rural health course.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how Logic Models can be used to facilitate the backwards design process, intentionally linking desired outcomes to learning activities.
  2. Create the initial components of a logic model for an individual learning activity or course.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-069-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Edward C. Portillo, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Casey Gallimore, University of Wisconsin-Madison

11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

History of Pharmacy SIG: Evolution and Application of U.S. Marijuana Laws to Pharmacists in Medical Cannabis Dispensing Roles

History of Pharmacy Special Interest Group, Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Pharmacy practice roles in medical marijuana dispensing violate current federal law. Appreciating the conflict between federal and individual state marijuana laws is essential to assessing pharmacist liability for medical marijuana dispensing roles against federal enforcement risks. Examine evolution of US controlled substances law, social-political trends from Nixon’s “War Against Drugs,” and the current national marijuana landscape, in order to understand how to evaluate pharmacist liability when pharmacy practice intersects with medical marijuana dispensing.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Understand US marijuana laws in the context of the social-political backdrop in the past 50 years (1970- present).
  2. Examine the current national marijuana landscape, social and political climate, and the pharmacist’s role in dispensing medical cannabis.
  3. Evaluate the pharmacist’s liability against federal enforcement risks for medical marijuana dispensing activities using case scenarios.
  4. Identify considerations/impact of medical marijuana on the business and practice of pharmacy.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-070-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Ettie Rosenberg, West Coast University; (Moderator) Daniel J. Ventricelli, University of the Sciences; (Moderator) Thomas S. Franko, Wilkes University

11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Choosing Assessment Tools for Interprofessional Teamwork During Experiential Rotations

Experiential Education Section, Assessment Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Lessons learned for successful use of assessment tools for interprofessional collaborative behaviors will be shared through experiences at four schools. Strategies for evaluating success of interprofessional assessment tools will be described. Participants will consider how to implement similar tools or refine their current assessment practices. Through interactive small groups, participants will discover strengths and weaknesses of different assessment approaches. Attendees are encouraged to bring copies of their current assessment tools for this workshop.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe tools for assessment of interprofessional collaboration.
  2. Describe use of an implementation framework to ensure appropriate use of preceptor delivery of an interprofessional activity.
  3. Utilize active learning strategies to gather practical approaches to improve use of implementation of assessment tools in experiential education.
  4. Discuss refinement of assessment tools to meet individual program needs.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-071-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Ashley Crowl, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Jennifer Danielson, University of Washington; (Speaker) Lori J. Duke, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Amanda Margolis, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Lindsey H. Welch, The University of Georgia

11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Co-Curriculum Assessment Modalities Across Accredited Pharmacy Programs

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This program will present results from a nationwide survey conducted by an AACP Assessment SIG subcommittee on the implementation and assessment of co-curriculum by accredited pharmacy programs. In addition, select programs will present their information on how co-curriculum is implemented at their institution, including requirements, mapping strategies, assessment, and student feedback. Target audience members are faculty and administrators associated with curriculum design and assessment.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the national landscape of co-curricular implementation and assessment modalities by accredited schools and colleges of pharmacy.
  2. Discuss assessment approaches to ensure that co-curricular learning outcomes are tracked and achieved.
  3. Based upon case studies from different institutions, outline best practice approaches to assess and map student learning within the co-curriculum.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-072-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Richard d'Assalenaux, West Coast University; (Speaker) Kelly C. Lee, University of California, San Diego; (Speaker) Cameron C. Lindsey, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Jaime L. Maerten-Rivera, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University

11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Evaluating, Disciplining, and Supporting Students After a Positive Drug Screen, DUI, or Arrest

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section, Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Programs face challenges in evaluating students after a positive drug screen, DUI, or arrest, as well as determining appropriate consequences, treatment and monitoring. Student support during these stressful times is often overlooked. These issues can occur at predicted times, such as routine drug screens, but often occur without advanced notice. Three different programs will share their strategies for evaluating, treating, monitoring, and supporting students after incidents involving alcohol or misused drugs.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe current efforts among 3 pharmacy programs to evaluate and support students after incidents involving alcohol or misused drugs.
  2. Develop a tool-kit of strategies to evaluate and support students after incidents involving alcohol or misused drugs.
  3. Compare and contrast different ways of evaluating and supporting students after incidents involving alcohol or misused drugs depending on state intern regulations, program mission and policies, and local health issues.
  4. Identify strategies to begin evaluating the effectiveness of supportive measures used for students after incidents involving alcohol or misused drugs.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-073-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Amy Diepenbrock, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University; Jeremy Hughes, California Health Sciences University

11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Precepting Students When English Is Not Their First Language

Experiential Education Section, Pharmacy Practice Section, Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

This program is intended for faculty and preceptors who work with students whose first language is not English. Specific needs for this student population will be addressed. The program will focus on case-based study and discussion involving the specific needs of these students. Tools to aid preceptors in helping the students succeed will be presented.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe unique challenges in precepting students whose native language is not English.
  2. Discuss potential barriers that prevent students from communicating their educational needs.
  3. Incorporate dynamic tools to effectively precept students whose native language is not English.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-074-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Norman E Fenn, The University of Texas at Tyler; (Speaker) Caroline Sierra, Loma Linda University

Noon–1:30 p.m.

AJPE Editorial Team Meeting

Monroe Boardroom 5, Concourse Level, East Tower

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Boxed Lunch in the Exhibit Hall and Research/Education Poster Session III

Ticket and Name Badge Required

Riverside Exhibit Hall (Exhibit Level, East Tower)

Grab a boxed lunch in the exhibit hall and take a look at more displays including the winners of the Innovations in Teaching Competition and Excellence in Assessment Award. From Noon–1:00 p.m., you can also meet with poster presenters.

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Bridging Accommodations in Skills-Based Courses to Experiential Settings: A Tale of Three Colleges of Pharmacy

Experiential Education Section, Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Pharmacy programs often grapple with how to support learners requiring disability-related accommodations on skills-based performance assessments. This session shares approaches taken by three institutions in developing accommodation plans that align with goals and objectives at the individual course level and support achievement of educational outcomes at the curricular level. Participants will leave the session with practical strategies for transitioning accommodations from classroom simulations to experiential environments. Target audience are instructors within skills-based and experiential courses.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify challenges associated with developing student accommodation plans that align with the goals and learning objectives of a skills-based course.
  2. Describe strategies that can be used to develop reasonable and effective accommodations for simulated performance-based assessments that support achievement of Educational Outcomes.
  3. Discuss methods for developing longitudinal accommodations that facilitate student transitions from assessments in the skills-based laboratory to experiential environments.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-075-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Casey Gallimore, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Sheila M. Allen, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Lucio Volino, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Ensuring Student Competency by Tailoring Remediation to Course Type and Area of Deficiency

Experiential Education Section, Assessment Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Accreditation standards encourage colleges/schools of pharmacy to develop policies related to student progression and unsatisfactory performance in the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum, including course remediation to achieve student competency. Course type and identified deficient content area often dictates how/if remediation is offered. This session focuses on challenges and solutions unique to remediation in the settings of experiential, skills-based, and didactic courses, and showcases examples in each. Program-level remediation policies will also be discussed.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how one remediation method may be better suited to assess student competency based on course type and stated learning objectives.
  2. Review unique remediation challenges associated with course goals/objectives for multiple course types.
  3. Consider how available resources may influence a chosen remediation method.
  4. Proactively identify challenges and solutions to the design and implementation of remediation activities.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-076-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Susanne G. Barnett, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Anita J. Cleven, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Maria Pruchnicki, The Ohio State University

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Global to Local: Connecting Global Health to Local Practice

Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group, Public Health Special Interest Group, Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Global health is an area for research and practice focusing on addressing health disparities and improving health equity. This often translates to programs and projects on an international stage, however the need for resolving health disparities and achieving health equity has relevance in the United States, particularly in rural and underserved communities. This highly interactive special session will focus on the development of future pharmacy leaders who will deploy global health educational strategies within the local environment.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify opportunities for partnership among organizations in your local environment to address global health needs.
  2. Describe examples of didactic and experiential activities used in multiple schools of pharmacy to develop global health skills in a local environment for student pharmacists.
  3. Brainstorm strategies for increased global health engagement in your local setting, in rural or otherwise underserved communities.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-077-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Sharon E. Connor, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Lauren J. Jonkman, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Stephanie N. Kiser, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University; (Speaker) Ellen M. Schellhase, Purdue University; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Joining the Conversation: Predictors of Success on NAPLEX and MPJE Performance

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Passing NAPLEX examination is required for pharmacists to obtain a licensure to practice in the U.S. In 2015, the lowest overall pass rate for the NAPLEX was reported, dropping to 85% overall. There are no clear predictors of success among pharmacy school applicants’ pre-admission characteristics on NAPLEX or MPJE. Presenters will review data from the literature and share multi-institutional survey data about predictors of success on NAPLEX and MPJE performance from 2016 to 2018.

(Speaker) Sharon K. Park, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Jennifer Phillips, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Nina Pavuluri, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine; (Speaker) Roopali Sharma, Touro College of Pharmacy-New York; (Moderator) Lisa Lebovitz, University of Maryland

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Moving Beyond a Collection of IPE Activities to a Theory-Based Curriculum and Assessment Plan

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Experts in interprofessional education (IPE) have called for use of theory in curriculum design. While evidence of this practice is growing, using theoretical approaches to inform curricular design in pharmacy education is still rare. Participants in this workshop will gain familiarity with commonly used, published pedagological theories related to IPE and practice applying them to curriculum design and assessment. Join us and learn how applying theory to teaching is not as boring as it sounds.

(Speaker) Jennifer Danielson, University of Washington; (Speaker) Erica J. Ottis, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Elena M. Umland, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Mayumi Willgerodt, University of Washington School of Nursing

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

One Size Does Not Fit All: Customized Approaches to Designing, Operationalizing, and Assessing the Co-Curriculum

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

The co-curriculum provides unique opportunities for holistic student development. As schools/colleges of pharmacy develop co-curriculum programs, an opportunity exists to share lessons learned in designing, implementing, and assessing the co-curriculum. This session will describe institutions’ unique approaches towards developing co-curriculum philosophy, identifying gaps to guide co-curriculum development, and implementing a co-curriculum framework that advances student learning and embraces learner-centered best practices. Participants will gain practical strategies to adapt and apply to their own programs’ co-curriculum.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Articulate the impact of learner centered philosophies and student development theories on creating effective student learning environments in the co-curriculum.
  2. Strategize, compare, and contrast practical efforts in developing, implementing, and assessing co-curricular programs.
  3. Evaluate opportunities to integrate students’ co-curricular experiences into advising and experiential programs.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-078-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jacqueline M Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Teresa M. DeLellis, Manchester University; (Speaker) Andrea L. Wilhite, Manchester University; (Speaker) Brad L. Wingo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Council of Deans Business Meeting

Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

All members of the Council of Deans are invited to receive reports on current and future council priorities.

(Chair) Evan T. Robinson, Western New England University

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Council of Faculties Business Meeting

Grand AB, Ballroom Level, East Tower

(Chair) Daniel A. Brazeau, Marshall University; (Moderator) Daniel A. Brazeau, Marshall University

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

On the Market for New SoTL Methods? Come Discover the Latest Trends in Education Research

Assessment Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session will uncover research methods underutilized or non-existent in the current pharmacy education literature. We will explore several emerging research methods from the fields of learning analytics, educational psychology, and the learning sciences. For example, we will discuss which types of research questions that physiological measures, social network analysis, and video narratives can answer. You will leave with fresh ideas for your future research and access to resources for implementing them.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Name at least three new research methods which could be used in pharmacy education research, but are not currently being utilized
  2. Identify one research method or analysis that they could utilize in their future SoTL
  3. Discover resources for implementing the selected research method or analysis in their future SoTL.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-079-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kayley M. Lyons, Monash University; (Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Patient-Taught Cultural Competency Training: A Novel Interprofessional Education Approach

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group, Minority Faculty Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session will describe the logistics and assessment methods utilized in a novel approach to interprofessional cultural competency training using patients as teachers of cultural competency. Pharmacy educators will be provided with the tools necessary to implement similar activities at their institutions, techniques for assessing the impact of the activity, and a brainstorming session to create interprofessional cultural competency application activities.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify practical tips on how to successfully approach the challenges of incorporating an interprofessional, patient-led cultural competency training into the curriculum.
  2. Create a roster of potential patient populations to have represented on a cultural competency panel.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-080-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Annesha White, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Caitlin Gibson, University of North Texas Health Science Center

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Beverage Break

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Preparing the Next Generation of Academic Scientists: Medical and Pharmacy School Collaborative Teaching Fellowship Program

Chemistry Section, Biological Sciences Section, Graduate Education Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Training the next generation of academic scientists how to be effective teachers is critical to healthcare education. This program highlights a partnership between Notre Dame of Maryland University School of Pharmacy, Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland School of Medicine to provide Ph.D. students and post-doctoral fellows the skills, knowledge and attitudes needed to be effective teachers through a regional Collaborative Teaching Fellowship Program (CTFP).

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Provide a model for how to create mutually beneficial opportunities between regional institutions around future faculty preparation.
  2. Describe the impact of the program on participants’ career placement and professional development and readiness.
  3. Describe the creation and implementation of a model for pedagogical training at an institutional level.
  4. Brainstorm how they might implement a similar program at their own institutions.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-081-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) James M. Culhane, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Jennifer Aumiller, University of Maryland School of Medicine; (Speaker) Kelly Clark, Johns Hopkins University; (Speaker) Christine Skibinski, Notre Dame of Maryland University

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Embracing Patient Diversity: Active Learning Strategies Prepare Students for Practice in a Multicultural World

Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Patient diversity can provide rich educational opportunities. However, it is imperative to prepare students to interact with and care for diverse patients while recognizing potential unique healthcare barriers. Exposure to various patient communities positions students to improve both care provided and access to healthcare. This session, for anyone designing curriculum to incorporate cultural competency, explores innovative methods implemented at 5 schools across 3 countries, highlighting shifts to active-learning through co-curricular activities, lab exercises, and OSCEs.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Examine the gap in cultural competence education as it relates to various patient populations
  2. Summarize how co-curricular activities required within a pharmacy skills lab could augment curricular cultural competence outcomes.
  3. Demonstrate several methods for integrating marginalized patient groups into active-learning exercises using the Patient Voices series as a template.
  4. Describe the development of an online cultural competence OSCE training module as a teaching tool for pharmacy students.
  5. Collaborate with other educators to brainstorm additional opportunities for cultural competence training and how the provided examples can be tailored for use at other institutions. .

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-082-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Heidi N. Anksorus, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Lawrencia Louise Brown, University College London; (Speaker) Vivienne Mak, Monash University; (Speaker) Brittney A. Meyer, South Dakota State University; (Speaker) Annie Nebergall, The Ohio State University; (Moderator) Gina Bellottie, Thomas Jefferson University; (Chair) Andrea L. Porter, University of Wisconsin-Madison

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Mobile Apps & the Future of Digital Health: The Future Is Now

Library and Information Science Section, Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Toronto (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Mobile apps and connected devices are used more and more in healthcare for instant information retrieval. Digital health is changing the way clinicians deliver and manage care from communication to telemedicine and medication adherence with wearable technology. Learn about mobile apps and digital health and identify which are currently being utilized in practice and the impact of the future of patient care.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Develop and define mobile application technology in the pharmacy profession and pharmacy education.
  2. Identify technologies utilized to manage or maintain resources to effectively manage therapy.
  3. Effectively communicate the usage of the technologies and instruct others about the impact and future of mobile applications and wearable technology.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-083-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jennifer R. Martin, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Timothy D. Aungst, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Are You Ready? Integrating Emergency Preparedness Into the Pharmacy Curriculum

Public Health Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Acapulco (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

With the always present dangers of man-made and natural disasters, pharmacists must be ready to answer the call. Training must occur while students are still in school, so as to engage them in emergency preparedness early in their careers. This session will build on recent AACP programming concerning emergency preparedness and is intended for faculty and administration interested in incorporating a wide array of emergency preparedness content and experiences into the pharmacy curriculum.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the importance of emergency preparedness.
  2. Identify opportunities for pharmacists and student pharmacists to participate in emergency preparedness and response.
  3. Describe methods of incorporating emergency preparedness into the pharmacy curriculum.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-084-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jonathan Thigpen, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Vibhuti Arya, St. John's University; (Speaker) Trina J von Waldner, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Brian Hierholzer, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Tamara McCants, Howard University; (Moderator) Sheila Seed, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Bridging the Gap from Fellow to Faculty: Building Effective Research Programs

Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Graduate Education Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Leading a successful research team requires skills beyond research ability and scientific training. In transitioning to faculty, the research trainee becomes the research trainer and must manage the operation of and people in their research program. In this session, residents, postdocs and junior faculty will learn from leaders of successful research programs how time, project and personnel management all work together to foster innovation while effective mentoring of trainees and research personnel drives success.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recognize opportunities to engage pharmacy students in your research program.
  2. Develop a strategy to recruit trainees and appropriate personnel into your research program.
  3. Advance the critical goals of your research program while supporting the professional development needs of your research team.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-085-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) James M. O'Donnell, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Diane M. Calinski, Manchester University; (Speaker) S. Suresh Madhavan, University of North Texas; (Speaker) Kimberly C. McKeirnan, Washington State University; (Speaker) William A. Prescott, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

The Most Bang for Your Buck: Top 10 Teaching and Learning Strategies for All Faculty

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Crystal B ( Lobby Level, West Tower)

We all want to be effective teachers but how can we be the best? How do students learn best? What are the best teaching strategies? This session will explore evidence for the top 10 teaching and learning strategies to implement in our classrooms. Both new faculty and seasoned professionals will take away new strategies that can easily be adapted to their classrooms.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the top 10 evidence-based teaching and learning strategies.
  2. Apply these evidence-based strategies to the various pharmacy learning environments.
  3. Brainstorm use of these methods in your teaching environment.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-086-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Ashley N Castleberry, The University of Texas at Austin

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Thoughtful Approaches to Changing Cultures and Supporting Student Mental Health Through Prevention, Identification, and Response

Pharmacy Practice Section, Social and Administrative Sciences Section, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This session will focus on approaches for identifying various student stressors, screening methods, and resources available for student support to maintain mental wellness. Importance of providing faculty training in navigating all available resources and potentially exploring new avenues to promote their students’ wellness will be explored.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recognize the different stressors students can experience including financial, food, housing, grades, etc.
  2. Identify resources for helping individuals struggling with mental health and wellness
  3. Describe strategies for incorporating proactive mental wellness resources into the pharmacy curriculum.
  4. Discuss the importance of faculty training in navigating mental health resources to help students in distress.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-087-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Steven C. Stoner, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Jaclyn Novatt, Long Island University; (Speaker) Diana Tamer, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Jane Shtaynberg, Long Island University

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

“Just Say Know” Your Audience: An Interprofessional Education Program Focused on the Stigma Associated With Substance Use Disorder

Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group, Public Health Special Interest Group, Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session focuses on a health sciences center and a health system collaboration to educate health professional students about substance use disorders (SUD) stigma in an interprofessional learning environment. Faculty will share their experiences of developing an annual interprofessional substance-use disorder stigma series, including both an interactive lecture and a highly adaptive expert panel discussion and allow participant to share their experiences. The intended audience is faculty interested in IPE and SUD education.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate professional student attitudes towards stigmas in order to best approach educational efforts.
  2. Compare and contrast various educational strategies (didactic, panel discussions, etc.) for addressing stigmatic topics such as addiction.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-088-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Gina M. Baugh, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Mark Paul Garofoli, West Virginia University

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Council of Deans Special Session: Accelerating the Evolution of Community Pharmacy Practice: Strategic Engagement Between Colleges of Pharmacy and Community Pharmacy Enhanced Services Networks

Pharmacy Practice Section, Experiential Education Section, Public Health Special Interest Group

Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

The growth of community pharmacy enhanced services networks (CPESNs) nationwide with nearly 3000 community pharmacies demonstrates the interest of community pharmacy teams to transform their practices by banding together to provide value through enhanced patient care services. Academic pharmacy has unique contributions to accelerate this rapid transformation. This session will feature examples of colleges who are strategically engaged with CPESNs and introduce an opportunity for all colleges to be involved with a Community Pharmacy Practice Transformation Initiative.

(Speaker) Melissa A. McGivney, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Troy Trygstad, CPESN USA; (Speaker) Megan G. Smith, University of Arkansas; (Speaker) Nicholas Leon, Jefferson College of Pharmacy

4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Disruptive Innovation in Pharmacy, presented by the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy

Crystal A (Lobby Level, West Tower)

The future of pharmacy hinges on the transformation of research, education and practice models. This session will unveil cutting edge innovations at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, the home of Pharmapreneurship®. Led by Dean Natalie Eddington, the presenters will engage the audience in discussing rapid cycle research, social and teaching entrepreneurship in pharmacy.

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

National Pharmacy Awareness Campaign

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

The national pharmacy awareness campaign – Pharmacists for Healthier Lives – has just completed the first year of a multi-year effort. Learn about Year One milestones and metrics. Get the latest news about campaign partner organizations. See the new campaign video and preview upcoming social media and earned media plans. Plus, contribute your stories to the campaign. 

(Speaker) Stephanie Saunders Fouch, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Daniel Sweet, RP3 Agency; (Speaker) Maggie Bergin, RP3 Agency

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

A Multi-Institution Collaboration to Improve the Quality of Peer Review of Teaching

Administrative Services Section, Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Processes for evaluating the quality of didactic and experiential teaching vary widely between institutions, and even within programs. This session will discuss the current landscape of evidence surrounding the benefits of peer review of teaching, historical practice at each institution, and the results of focused collaboration and resource-sharing. The goal of this session is to provide faculty and administrators tools to improve the quality of peer review of teaching at their own programs.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe current landscape of evidence around the benefits of peer review of teaching.
  2. Discuss historical and current practice in peer review of teaching, including opportunities and challenges, at each of the collaborating institutions.
  3. Describe collaboration processes around educational systems, including peer review of teaching.
  4. Identify opportunities for improving the quality of peer review of teaching within your institution.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-090-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Kathryn A. Morbitzer; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Speaker) Jeannine M. Conway, University of Minnesota

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

A Tale of Two Cities: Approach to the Co-Curriculum at a Public and Private Institution

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group, Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Pharmacy educators will learn how two colleges designed co-curricular programs to enhance Continuous Professional Development (CPD). Participants will assess program goals and personal level of confidence in developing and improving the co-curriculum at their institution through the CPD process. Diverse approaches to program design, data collection and analysis, using innovative technology, will be shared. Participants will provide feedback using a mobile-device based application developed for tracking co-curricular experiences.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Assess program goals and personal level of confidence in developing and improving the co-curriculum at your institution.
  2. Describe methods for planning, implementing, and tracking co-curricular experiences.
  3. Identify strategies for assessing co-curricular experiences at your institution.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-091-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Graciela M. Armayor, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Trina J von Waldner, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Robert McGory, Nova Southeastern University; (Moderator) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Moderator) Karen R. Sando, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Rochelle Nappi, Nova Southeastern University

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Best Practices and Continuous Quality Improvement for Teaching and Learning Curricula

Pharmacy Practice Section, Continuing Professional Development Section, Assessment Special Interest Group

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Teaching and Learning Curricula (TLCs) play an important role in training the next generation of pharmacy educators and have become widely available throughout the country for post-graduate pharmacists in residencies, fellowships, graduate school, and in practice. Several national organizations have published best practice recommendations for the design and conduct of TLCs. This session, intended for pharmacy educators who lead TLCs, will review best practices and describe application of continuous quality improvement principles to TLCs.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain current best practice recommendations for the design and delivery of TLCs.
  2. Apply principles of continuous quality improvement to conduction of a TLC.
  3. Anticipate and discuss one potential solution for a challenge that may be encountered during the implementation of a TLC.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-092-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) Alex N. Isaacs, Purdue University; (Speaker) Amy H. Sheehan, Purdue University; (Speaker) Darin C. Ramsey, Butler University; (Speaker) Tracy Sprunger, Butler University

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Course Overhaul: Tips and Tricks for Reverse-Designing Application-Based Pharmacy Courses

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription medicine Special Interest Group

Acapulco (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This hands-on session will draw on the speakers’ joint experience in redesigning 18 semester-hours worth of pharmacy coursework to engage participants interested in redesigning all or part of their courses. Backward course design theory and approaches will be reviewed and then applicants will apply the concepts to their own course with guidance from real-life examples. Please come with your course outline if possible and an idea of what you hope to achieve with redesign.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize the evidence supporting backward course design.
  2. Define summative assessment, formative assessment, and intentional repetition as they relate to course design.
  3. Outline an approach for revising all or part of a course using backward course design.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-093-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Shanna O'Connor, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Amy K. Kennedy, The University of Arizona

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Living and Leading With Intention: Individuals Achieve Goals by Prioritizing and Aligning With Organizational Needs

Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Continuing Professional Development Section, Administrative Services Section

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

While self-awareness and leadership are now required in our Pharm.D. curricula, these topics are also relevant to faculty. This workshop will include a discussion of how faculty can refine their priorities to reach professional goals. As colleges of pharmacy look to prepare the future generations of pharmacists, organizations can also benefit from defining priorities. Individual faculty and administrators will benefit from strategies to set personal and organizational priorities, adopting an individual “strategic plan” mindset.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss persistent myths about work-life balance for pharmacy educators.
  2. Identify strategies for defining personal success, discerning what opportunities to take advantage of and how to build and maintain a support network.
  3. Identify strategies for organizations achieve their strategic goals by defining them in a focused way that also aligns with their organization’s goals.
  4. Apply strategies that will help prioritize goals to ensure that they are met.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-094-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, University of Florida; (Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Strategizing for Student Success: Perspectives on Institutional Initiatives to Facilitate Academic Achievement

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Fostering academic success is a primary initiative for all schools of pharmacy, and recommendations of best practice have yet to be fully defined. Efforts supporting academic success are expected to impact quantitative metrics of program attrition and on-time program progression, and as such, address ACPE Standard 17. This session, appropriate for all pharmacy educators, will showcase academic support program design in three institutions, addressing academic risk variable identification, and initiatives implemented to support academic success.

(Speaker) Steven J. Crosby, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) Elizabeth T. Skoy, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Michael W. Neville, Wingate University

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Using Psychometric Data to Improve Item and Test Development

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Examinations are commonly used for summative assessment of student learning in pharmacy education. How certain are you in the quality of your exam items, validity of item mapping and reliability of your assessments, especially when determining students’ minimum competence to progress? Faculty and assessment professionals will learn about the use of psychometric data to improve item development and exam construction, and recognize new advantages and the shortcomings of computer-based testing systems.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify best practices for exam item development and mapping, and exam blueprinting.
  2. Determine when and how to revise exam items and scoring based on available psychometric data.
  3. Discuss the importance of establishing validity and reliability of summative assessments.
  4. Compare and contrast different metrics and techniques for establishing the reliability of exam scores.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-095-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Sean T Leonard, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Margarita V. DiVall, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Ashok E. Philip, Union University

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

An Important Conversation About Pharmacist Workforce Data

Assessment Special Interest Group, Administrative Services Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Recent data suggest the number of pharmacist job openings can accommodate new graduates over the next decade only if the profession continues to expand. It is essential for schools of pharmacy to understand current labor trends and prepare graduates for their job search in this competitive environment. This in-depth discussion will present pharmacist demand data as well as job posting data that highlight trends in job locations, employers, and desired skills.

(Speaker) Lisa Lebovitz, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Michael J Rudolph, University of Kentucky

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Leveraging Community Stakeholders to Develop Pharm.D. Students as Trained Volunteers and Leaders in Disaster Preparedness

Public Health Special Interest Group, Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session will highlight co-curricular opportunities for community engagement which connect pharmacy students with public health leaders to establish a critical relationship to maintain consistent volunteers for local community and statewide disaster needs. In the event of a localized disaster, the trained faculty and students can be deployed seamlessly to support the needs as identified by our public health leadership partners.

(Speaker) Greene Shepherd, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Stephanie N. Kiser, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Global Pharmacy Education SIG: Business Meeting

Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group

Acapulco (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

(Chair) Abby A. Kahaleh, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University; (Speaker) Toyin S. Tofade, Howard University

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Health Care Ethics SIG: Business Meeting

Health Care Ethics Special Interest Group

Michigan 2 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Chair) James W. Torr, Lipscomb University; (Chair) David M. Baker, Western New England University

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence SIG: Business Meeting

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Nancy Borja-Hart, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Imbi Drame, Howard University; (Speaker) Jeri J. Sias, The University of Texas at El Paso; (Speaker) Naser Z. Alsharif, Creighton University

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Laboratory Instructors SIG: Business Meeting

Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

Toronto (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This session will serve as the annual business meeting and networking session for the Laboratory Instructors SIG.

(Chair) Andrea L. Porter, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Karen R. Sando, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Gina Bellottie, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Deanna Tran, University of Maryland

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Professional Resources Committee Meeting

Library and Information Science Section

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

This is the business meeting for the Professional Resources Committee of the Library and Information Science Section. This committee is responsible for the AACP Basic Resources for Pharmacy Education and Core List of Journals for Pharmacy Education.

(Speaker) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) Ivan Portillo, Chapman Univesity

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Pediatric Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting

Pediatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group

Michigan 3 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Meeting of the SIG's leadership and members. SIG officers will provide annual reports; SIG committee chairs will provide committee reports; SIG Chair-elect will discuss 2019-20 SIG charges; SIG leadership will establish 2019-20 SIG committee leadership/membership; new officers of the SIG will be installed.

(Chair) William A. Prescott, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Public Health SIG: Business Meeting

Public Health Special Interest Group

Columbus AB, Ballroom Level, East Tower

(Speaker) Jonathan Thigpen, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Cortney M Mospan, Wingate University; (Speaker) Jordan R. Covvey, Duquesne University

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIG: Business Meeting

Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription medicine Special Interest Group

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Chair and Speaker) Kristy L. Brittain, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Jennifer A. Wilson, Wingate University; (Speaker) Emily M. Ambizas, St. John's University; (Speaker) Miranda J. Wilhelm, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; 

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Student Services Personnel SIG: Business Meeting

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Speaker) Renee M. DeHart, Samford University; (Speaker) Helen C. Park, Roseman University of Health Sciences; Jeremy A. Hughes, California Health Sciences University

5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Substance Use Disorder SIG: Business Meeting

Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Tran Tran, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

AACP President's Reception

By Invitation Only

Plaza Ballroom, (Lobby Level, East Tower)

Passing the gavel, honoring AACP President Dr. David Allen and AACP President-elect Dr. Todd Sorensen for their exceptional dedication to the pharmacy academy.

6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy

Alumni & Friends Reception

Addams Room (3rd Floor, West Tower)

7:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Reception

Crystal C (Lobby Level, West Tower)

Tuesday

24 hour hold

Meet the Editor

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education? Or signing up to be a manuscript reviewer? Do you have a question about AJPE? Stop by and meet the editor, associate editors and editorial staff of AJPE. We'll be here during breakfast and beverage break times!

(Chair) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University

6:30 a.m.–7:30 a.m.

AM Fitness Program

Plaza Ballroom, (Lobby Level, East Tower)

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

7:00 a.m.– 8:00 a.m.

Assessment SIG: Business Meeting

Assessment Special Interest Group

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Margarita V. DiVall, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Neal J. Benedict, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Tara L. Jenkins, Touro University California; (Speaker) Wallace Marsh, University of New England

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Curriculum SIG Business Meeting

Curriculum Special Interest Group

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Speaker) Diane W. Morel, South College; (Speaker) Jennifer A. Henriksen, Manchester University; (Speaker) Jennifer M. Malinowski, Wilkes University

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Geriatric SIG Business Meeting

Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Annual business meeting for the Geriatrics SIG to convene and plan for the upcoming year.

(Speaker) Christine M. Ruby-Scelsi, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Rebecca Mahan, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Graduate Education SIG: Business Meeting

Graduate Education Special Interest Group

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Speaker) Kimberly B. Garza, Auburn University

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

History of Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting

History of Pharmacy Special Interest Group

Randolph 2 (Concourse Level, West Tower)

(Speaker) James M. Culhane, Notre Dame of Maryland University

7:00 a.m.– 8:00 a.m.

Minority Faculty SIG: Business Meeting

Minority Faculty Special Interest Group

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Oscar W. Garza, University of Minnesota

7:00 a.m.– 8:00 a.m.

Pharmacogenomics SIG: Business Meeting

Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Biological Sciences Section

Randolph 3 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Philip E. Empey, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Roseann S. Gammal, MCPHS University–Boston

7:00 a.m.– 8:00 a.m.

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning SIG: Business Meeting

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Timothy D. Aungst, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester

7:00 a.m.– 3:00 p.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2019 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Networking Room 1 of 3

Monroe Boardroom 1 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Want to catch up with old friends, meet new ones or discuss similar interests? Want to continue the discussion from a fantastic session? Come to the Networking Rooms or schedule time at the AACP Registration and Help Desk.

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Networking Room 2 of 3

Monroe Boardroom 2 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Networking Room 3 of 3

Monroe Boardroom 3 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Meditation Room

Grand Suite 2B (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

8:00 a.m.– 8:30 a.m.

It's All Greek to Me! Incorporating Novel Active Learning Activities to Develop Cultural Competence

Pharmacy Practice Section, Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group, Public Health Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session is designed for faculty to discuss incorporation of hands-on activities for students to practice communication skills used in caring for culturally diverse patients. The emphasis on cultural awareness in the 2016 ACPE standards challenges educators to develop effective and appropriate activities to increase student awareness of cultural attributes and the effects on healthcare decision-making. Attendees will review examples of activities from one school and participate in a brief sample activity with discussion.

(Speaker) Jennifer G. Smith, The University of Louisiana at Monroe; (Speaker) Savannah K. Posey, The University of Louisiana at Monroe

8:00 a.m.– 8:30 a.m.

Lessons Learned and Preliminary Outcomes From Implementation of an Asynchronous Interprofessional Quality Improvement Experience

Pharmacy Practice Section, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session, for interprofessional education (IPE) instructors, highlights using an asynchronous discussion forum to create an IPE experience focused on healthcare quality improvement for pharmacy, medical and nursing students. Students build upon concepts from Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School courses to analyze a medical error case. Student teams are responsible for identifying error causes and system-wide solutions for preventing similar errors. Lessons learned and preliminary outcomes from two years of implementation will be presented.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the implementation and lessons learned from an asynchronous discussion forum for pharmacy, medicine, and nursing students.
  2. Assess preliminary outcomes based upon student pharmacist perceptions of the experience via reflections and a modified ICCAS survey.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-096-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Veronica S. Young, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Leticia R. Moczygemba, The University of Texas at Austin

8:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Grand Suite 5 (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Taking care of business sometimes requires taking care of yourself in the process. AACP is making it easy with the PharmCAS R&R Lounge—designed to offer attendees a brief but much-needed respite from crowds, noise and other common meeting stresses, while keeping you fresh for the business of learning and networking. Kick up your feet, check your e-mail, charge your phone, tablet or laptop and unwind. There will be four laptop kiosks available on a first-come, first-served basis. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment. With support from our sponsor, PharmCAS, powered by Liaison, the lounge services are complimentary so make time to stop by for a little R&R!

8:30 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Innovation in Teaching Award

The recipient of the 2019 Innovation in Teaching Award will present the winning submission.

Master Adaptive Learning: Re-engineering Core Integrated Pharmacotherapy Curriculum for 21st Century Learning, from Denise H. Rhoney, Amanda H. Corbett, Sarah M. Anderson, Tom Angelo, Ian Hollis, Kathryn A. Morbitzer and Phil Rodgers, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

(Moderator) Susan M. Meyer, University of Pittsburg

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

How to Grow a Graduate Program

Graduate Education Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section, Biological Sciences Section

Randolph 3 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

The targeted audience is graduate program administrators and faculty. This session will provide information on mechanisms for funding research and challenges associated with initiating and sustaining graduate education. Changes to the R15 funding mechanism make this session especially relevant for smaller institutions. Speakers will address: 1) potential funding mechanisms for graduate programs through NIH grants, Teaching Assistantships to aid in teaching in Pharm.D. curricula, and industry partnered funding; 2) starting graduate programs and funding students.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Provide strategic advice on funding mechanisms available to graduate programs.
  2. Provide approaches and examples on how to implement new graduate programs.
  3. Discuss experiences related to grant preparation, submission, and successful execution.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-097-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Chair) Richard R. Vaillancourt, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Xiangming Guan, South Dakota State University; (Speaker) Jane E Cavanaugh, Duquesne University

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Innovative Ways of Keeping It “Old School”

Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

The “Gray Tsunami” is upon us. Baby Boomers are living longer than older people in preceding generations. With 40% of hospitalized adults over the age of 65, the importance of education focusing on medication use in older adults is essential. This program will describe novel teaching methods to incorporate geriatric concepts in pharmacy curricula. This program is targeted to all pharmacy faculty who desire to incorporate fresh learning exercises into their didactic or experiential curricula.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe novel methods to incorporate geriatric concepts (e.g. polypharmacy, deprescribing) into pharmacy curricula.
  2. Discuss innovative processes to educate about essential skills needed to optimize geriatric care in experiential education.
  3. Create or revise an exercise focused on geriatric care among program participants.
  4. Contribute to novel teaching ideas that can be shared among AACP members.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-098-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Christine M. Ruby-Scelsi, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Rebecca Mahan, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center; (Speaker) Teresa M. DeLellis, Manchester University

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Ethical Dimensions of the Prescription Opioid Abuse Crisis

Health Care Ethics Special Interest Group, Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

This interactive session will explore the ethical missteps made by a number of institutional moral agents that have contributed to the current prescription opioid abuse crisis in the U.S., including Pharma companies, the FDA, the DEA, the Joint Commission and CMS. Audience members will interactively identify and discuss ethical principles at play in the vignettes described in the presentation.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe at least one ethical dilemma that helped give rise to the current opioid abuse crisis in the U.S.
  2. Identify at least three institutional moral agents whose decisions have contributed to the current opioid abuse crisis, and describe their roles in this saga.
  3. Describe the ethics principles at play in objective 2 above and explain how these principles were supported or violated.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-099-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) David M. Baker, Western New England University; (Speaker) Tim Stratton, University of Minnesota

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Navigating the Educational Approaches and Assessment for Personal and Professional Development (CAPE Domain 4)

Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This session will describe contemporary educational approaches and strategies for evaluating Personal and Professional Development. Didactic, co-curricular, and extracurricular approaches for student development in self-awareness; leadership; innovation and entrepreneurship; and professionalism will be shared through experiences from numerous colleges. A roundtable format will foster discussion and engagement among participants. Each table will introduce specific approaches, implementation steps, outcomes observed, and lessons learned. Faculty, administrators, and staff responsible for integrating and assessing these concepts are invited.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain various self-assessment tools used for Self-Awareness development.
  2. Discuss opportunities to improve Personal and Professional Development content in the program through didactic, extracurricular and co-curricular approaches.
  3. Evaluate various assessment techniques for Personal and Professional Development.
  4. Design a plan for further integrating one or more of the topic areas in Personal and Professional Development upon returning to your home institution.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-100-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

Speaker) Mary M. Bridgeman, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; (Speaker) W. Mark Moore, Campbell University; (Speaker) Trang D Trinh, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Kim M. Jones, Union University; (Moderator) Jenelle Sobotka, University of Cincinnati

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Secret Sauce: Vitality, Resiliency and Empowerment

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Personal story telling, professional and personal development, and academic skills are essential ingredients to motivate and strengthen resiliency and vitality among students and faculty. Well-being is a cross-cutting to all disciplines and specializations. Promoting solutions to improve individual and organizational well-being strategies are essential to foster vitality and empowerment.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. List the personal qualities that can be developed to build student and faculty resilience.
  2. Describe how organizations can create a culture of caring, connection, empowerment, and meaning that supports resiliency.
  3. Develop an individual and organizational development plan to implement strategies in the respective workplace settings using the 12 factor organizational health model.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-101-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Seena L. Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Jenny A. Van Amburgh, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Dana P. Hammer, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Susan M. Stein, Pacific University Oregon

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Making the Match: Assessing Strategies for Student Success in Obtaining Postgraduate Training

Pharmacy Practice Section, Experiential Education Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Postgraduate training (residency/fellowship) in pharmacy has become extremely competitive based on the number of interested applicants and available positions. This session will review the current landscape of postgraduate training, and discuss strategies utilized at several different colleges of pharmacy to improve student preparation, match success rates and assessment of these activities. Active learning will include small group discussions, audience polling and facilitated discussion to compare and contrast different strategies for postgraduate preparation.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the current landscape of postgraduate pharmacy training.
  2. Compare and contrast different strategies used at colleges throughout the country to improve student preparation for postgraduate training.
  3. Develop a strategy to incorporate new postgraduate training programs into current offerings at your school of pharmacy.
  4. Identify assessment strategies related to students learning around CAPE outcome 4.

Application-based UAN: (0581-0000-19-136-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator & Speaker) Matthew A. Wanat, University of Houston; (Moderator) Danielle Miller, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University; (Speaker) Elizabeth Autry; University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Alexa A. Carlson, Northeastern University

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Optional but Critical: New Approaches to Electives Sequences in Pharmacy Curricula

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Toronto (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

The purpose of the session is to stimulate discussion around the mindful planning of didactic electives in pharmacy curricula. Presenters will focus on the design of elective sequences, along with resources and tips for offerings that differentiate graduates and deepen skill sets. Elective curricula that range from 6 – 16 credits will be described with attention to issues such as: implementation, career planning autonomy, advising, involvement of alumni and recognition of completion. Target audience: Curriculum SIG.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss components of pharmacy elective course offerings intended to support the development of a focused skill set and to differentiate students upon graduation.
  2. Outline a process to support students’ selection of elective coursework to inform their career interests.
  3. Identify and cultivate partnerships within and outside of the pharmacy program in order to offer elective course offerings to students.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-102-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Candice L. Garwood, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Helen Berlie, Wayne State University

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Pharmacists Independently Prescribing Hormonal Contraception: Modifying the Curriculum to Make Practice Ready Prescribers

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section, Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

As the role of the pharmacist continues to evolve from dispensing to delegated and independent prescribing, the education of students who are confident and practice-ready to prescribe needs to evolve as well. The presenters have taught both the therapeutics and the law of pharmacist prescribing of hormonal contraception in California, Washington, and Oregon and will share how they have evolved their curriculum to meet the needs of their students and states.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the need for evolving the Pharm.D. curriculum to include elements to allow students to be practice-ready for independent prescribing.
  2. Describe current efforts among 3 pharmacy programs to modify the hormonal contraception curriculum to prepare students for independent pharmacist prescribing.
  3. Compare and contrast different active learning activities and teaching modalities that can be used based on the learning methodology of a program (lecture-based versus team-based learning) to better prepare pharmacy students to independently prescribe medications.
  4. Identify strategies to begin evaluating the effectiveness of curricular changes to allow for students to be practice-ready for independent prescribing.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-103-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jeremy A. Hughes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Julie Akers, Washington State University

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Remediation in Experiential Education: Innovative Approaches from the NERDEE Consortium

Experiential Education Section

Acapulco (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

This session is a collaborative presentation from programs representing the New England Regional Departments of Experiential Education (NERDEE) consortium. Representatives from University of Connecticut, MCPHS University, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Vermont Campus, and Western New England University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences will present an overview of common areas of deficiency identified in IPPE and APPE learners, and then describe innovative approaches to remediation utilized by the various programs.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the common areas of deficiency which result in the failure of IPPE rotations.
  2. Describe the process of creating competency-specific activities to remediate IPPE deficiencies and ensure APPE-readiness.
  3. Describe the common areas of deficiency which result in the failure of APPE rotations.
  4. Describe the innovative APPE remediation approaches in place at three programs representing the New England Regional Departments of Experiential Education (NERDEE) consortium.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-141-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Sandra W. Rosa, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) Jill M. Fitzgerald, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Rita Morelli, MCPHS University–Boston; (Speaker) Courtney R. Caimano, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Test Anxiety’s Effect on Performance: Managing the Power of the Mind

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Pharmacy educators seek to help struggling students often using office hours, study guides, and exam reviews. What if the main problem isn’t learning the material but involves anxiety before or during an exam? This session will (1) constructively summarize test anxiety literature and theory (2) report on studies from health professions education, and (3) engage faculty, administrators, and student services personnel in identifying actionable strategies to increase the ability of students to manage test anxiety.

(Speaker) Adam Pate, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Kimberly K. Daugherty, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Michelle O. Zagar, The University of Louisiana at Monroe

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Application of Video Modeling to Enhance Student Communication Skills and APPE-Readiness.

Pharmacy Practice Section, Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Schools/colleges of pharmacy must ensure students are able to verbally communicate professionally and effectively. This session describes use of the video modeling (VM) framework to teach complex verbal communication skills in simulated healthcare settings, including presenting a complex patient case to a preceptor and interprofessional communication via pharmacotherapy recommendations. Attendees will participate in a VM demonstration and consider how incorporation of VM can enhance student communication skills at home institutions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define the steps associated with integrating the VM learning process into a course/curriculum.
  2. Describe how VM can be used to enhance student communication to pharmacy preceptors and members of the interprofessional health team.
  3. Apply the VM practice to the development and implementation of a communication-based activity.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-104-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Susanne G. Barnett, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Edward C. Portillo, University of Wisconsin-Madison

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Reducing Bias in Evaluations of Teaching: A Case for Faculty Peer Review of Teaching

Women Faculty Special Interest Group, Minority Faculty Special Interest Group, Continuing Professional Development Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Student evaluation of faculty teaching has been shown to be biased against women and minorities, yet many schools continue to use student evaluations as a main source for evaluating teaching. This session will describe one school’s evidence-based approach for implementing a faculty peer review of teaching program from the pilot stage through full implementation. During this open book discussion we will share our successes, challenges, and lessons learned along the way.

(Speaker) Rory O'Callaghan Kim, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Lisa Goldstone, University of Southern California

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Spouse/Guests Hospitality Room

Grand Suite 1 (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 3

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app.

(Moderator) Steven C. Stoner, University of Missouri-Kansas City

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Educational Strategies to Reduce Implicit Bias and Improve Self-Awareness of Pharmacy Students

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Evaluating implicit bias and gaining self-awareness are vital components of cultural competency training. This session will review the impact of bias on health outcomes and existing challenges to teaching this topic in the curricula. Faculty participants will also be presented with strategies and best practices that can be implemented at their colleges to improve self-awareness of implicit biases in order to make students more prepared for diverse patient care encounters in the future.

(Speaker) Jennifer A. Santee, University of Missouri-Kansas City; (Speaker) Sally Arif, Midwestern University/Downers Grove

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Coordinating a Response to Student Suicide: Perspectives on the Worst Day of Our Lives

Administrative Services Section, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Student stress, depression, and anxiety are significant concerns in pharmacy education. Student pharmacists learn how to manage pharmacotherapy for chronic illnesses, but may not prioritize caring for themselves. This session will describe the reverberating impact of the tragic loss of a student pharmacist to suicide on a pharmacy community from a faculty and student perspective, and explore a toolkit from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention entitled After a Suicide: A Toolkit for Medical Schools.

(Speaker) Mollie A. Scott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Brad L. Wingo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Team-Ready, Set, Go! Going Beyond Roles/Responsibilities to Teamwork Development in an Interprofessional Classroom

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Learning about, from, and with other professions is the backbone of interprofessional education. Developing skills and behaviors necessary for interacting with interprofessional colleagues is an essential component of interprofessional learning. Although multiple creative ways to implement interprofessional content and skills have been described, limited emphasis has been placed on how to teach and develop teamwork behaviors. This session will explore the deliberate incorporation of teamwork behaviors into interprofessional learning experiences.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify elements of teamwork that should be embedded into interprofessional education.
  2. Compare various models of teamwork training in interprofessional education.
  3. Apply methodology for teamwork training through practice scenarios.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-105-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Michelle Z. Farland, University of Florida; (Speaker) Amber King, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Elena M. Umland, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Jennifer Danielson, University of Washington

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Independent or Integrated?: Debating the Optimal Approach to Pharmacogenomics Education in the Pharm.D. Curriculum

Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Biological Sciences Section

Toronto (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

While pharmacogenomics has been included in ACPE standards for many years, the approach to teaching this important topic is controversial. The quantity, delivery, and placement of pharmacogenomics content in curricula is highly variable. This session will overview the current status of pharmacogenomics education in schools of pharmacy followed by a spirited debate of the pros and cons of dedicated required pharmacogenomics courses vs. integrating pharmacogenomics content throughout the curriculum. It is intended for basic science and clinical faculty as well as administrators.

(Speaker) Grace M. Kuo, University of California, San Diego; (Speaker) James M. Stevenson, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Solomon M Adams, Shenandoah University; (Moderator) Philip E. Empey, University of Pittsburgh

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Integrating Social Determinants of Health Into a Pharmacy Curriculum: An Interprofessional Approach

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016 acknowledge and encourage the inclusion of social determinants of health (SDoH) within the curriculum to better prepare student pharmacists to recognize SDoH to diminish disparities and inequities in providing patient access to quality health care. Session participants will identify ways to incorporate SDoH into their pharmacy curriculum while using an interprofessional approach.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify ways to incorporate interprofessional education activities that focus on social determinants of health into your pharmacy curriculum.
  2. Develop assessment tools for evaluating students’ ability to recognize social determinants of health.

Application-based UAN: (0581-0000-19-135-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Chelsea Renfro, The University of Tennessee; (Moderator and Speaker) Chasity M. Shelton, The University of Tennessee

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

A Practical Guide for Experiential Education Teams: Implementing Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA) Based Assessment Tools

Experiential Education Section, Assessment Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

The Experiential Education teams from two colleges of pharmacy will lead participants through their two-year, data-driven, systematic journey to successful implementation of EPA-based evaluation tools. This interactive session will reveal the key processes, decision-points, and challenges faced during implementation at each institution. Implementation-related data will also be presented. This session will also facilitate participants’ brainstorming of methodologic approaches to these changes and how to address the anticipated decision-points and challenges at their respective institutions

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Prepare for assessment changes involving the use of EPAs within Experiential Education programs, while also meeting CAPE Outcomes and ACPE Accreditation Standards.
  2. Explore change methodology for improving assessment tools, involving iterative preceptor feedback and ongoing input from an Experiential Education Advisory Committee.
  3. Discuss preliminary data generated from EPA-based evaluation tool implementation.
  4. Examine challenges and opportunities associated with updating IPPE and APPE evaluation tools based on EPAs.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-106-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Whitney Maxwell, University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Baker, University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Cathy L. Worrall, Medical University of South Carolina

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Diverse Approaches to Interprofessional Education: A Two-Institution Perspective Using Simulation and Virtual Patients

Biological Sciences Section, Pharmacy Practice Section, Experiential Education Section

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

ACPE 2016 Standard 11, Interprofesssional Education (IPE) poses a challenge for curriculum and assessment. We will share our experience in the creation of the four tenets of an IPE program: a) orientation, b) integration, c) content delivery by simulation, case conference, and use of virtual patients, and d) defining outcomes and assessment strategies. Ours is a joint perspective from the California Northstate University and the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Target: all levels.

(Speaker) Ashim Malhotra, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Mathews, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

LOL for Student Engagement II: Making Education PharmacoPhunny

Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Acapulco (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Miss the fun and laughter from 2018? We’re back for part deux! Continue the journey as we deconstruct humor and how emotions connect with learning, facilitate self-awareness among faculty members to identify what makes them who they are, and how they can use tools and techniques that align with their personality in order to engage their students. You will leave feeling energized and equipped with tools to take your teaching to the next level.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss personality traits we all possess that make each of us uniquely capable of bringing fun into the learning environment;
  2. Describe the science and neuroscience behind creating an emotional connection to learning;
  3. Demonstrate a variety of techniques that can be used to spark learning and retention; and
  4. Utilize self-reflection and guided exercise to connect humor and theatrical instruction with expected learning outcomes.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-107-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University; (Speaker) Susan S. Vos, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Vibhuti Arya, St. John's University

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Pharmacists as Independent Prescribers: Initial Considerations from Idaho and Oregon

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Administrative Services Section, Pharmacy Practice Section

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

New laws in some states have expanded pharmacist’s roles by granting independent prescriptive authority over some medications. Traditional pharmacy curricula incorporates prescribing under collaborative practice under a physician, but not independent prescribing. This session will draw upon Idaho and Oregon’s experience in incorporating pharmacist independent prescribing into their curricula, as well as the role of a college or school of pharmacy in a progressive law environment.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss possible opportunities for and barriers to pharmacists independently prescribing in a community setting.
  2. Describe the role of a college or school of pharmacy in supporting future and current pharmacists with progressive, independent prescribing practices.
  3. Using examples of Idaho and Oregon laws, describe curricular strategies for training students for independent prescribing in the community setting.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-108-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Adams, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Lorinda Anderson, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Michael Biddle, Idaho State University

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Bringing More Women Into Senior Leadership – Breaking the Glass Ceiling

Women Faculty Special Interest Group, Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Continuing Professional Development Section

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

An interactive session with women leaders who will not only inspire you to step up but rather share their personal inspirations and provide practical applications for leading. This session will bring together people in all stages of their careers to see leadership positions as attainable career options. The session will be interactive (like a fireside chat) with women academic leaders nominated by the Women’s SIG membership.

(Speaker) Debbie C. Byrd, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Christine R. Birnie, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Janet P. Engle, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Susan P. Bruce, Northeast Ohio Medical University; (Speaker) Anne Y.F. Lin, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Shauna M. Buring, University of Florida; (Moderator) Jenny A. Van Amburgh, Northeastern University

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Increasing Self-Awareness of Behavioral Patterns in a Pharmacy Leadership Elective

Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Emphasizing self-awareness within a pharmacy curriculum can be challenging. Speakers will share an innovative method from a pharmacy leadership elective in which students embark on a journey of self-discovery to gain a deeper understanding of their repetitive behavioral patterns. Patterns include overfunctioning, underfunctioning, triangulation, distancing, and cutoff. Increased understanding of these patterns allows students to recognize and manage their engagement in these behaviors, with the opportunity to ultimately positively impact personal and professional interactions.

(Speaker) Andrea S. Joseph, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Emily R. Hajjar, Thomas Jefferson University

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

She’s Pregnant! Guiding Faculty as They Accommodate Pregnant and Parenting Students

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Women Faculty Special Interest Group, Administrative Services Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Pregnant and parenting students are protected from discrimination by Title IX, but research has shown that many faculty are unaware of how Title IX applies to pregnant and parenting students. In this session the presenter will share results from a research study on faculty experiences with pregnant and parenting students and what support and education faculty may need in supporting and accommodating this student population.

(Speaker) Katherine S. Wadas-Thalken, Creighton University

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Adding to Your Impact Factor With Strategic Science Communication

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

You’ve published a paper, but don’t let your scholarly impact end there. Whether through news media, social media, or other forms of science communication, understanding how to translate your work to different audiences can open the door for new opportunities. In this panel discussion, communications experts and experienced science communicators will share different methods to add your perspective to the broader scientific discussion to boost your reputation as a trusted expert in the field.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recognize opportunities to communicate your research in non-academic settings.
  2. Leverage institutional resources to enhance your message.
  3. Adapt your message to the communication method and lay-audience needs.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-089-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Kyle R. Bagin, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Chris Gummert, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Jordan R. Covvey, Duquesne University 

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Getting Started in Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Creating Your Big Break Without Formal Training

Biological Sciences Section, Library and Information Science Section, Pharmacy Practice Section

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Are you a pharmacy educator who is passionate about teaching and eager to dive into scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL)? It can be challenging to break into the SoTL scene without formal training, even for inspired faculty. In this program, winners of the AACP Emerging Teaching Scholar Award will share how they created their SoTL “big break” in three diverse areas and lead small groups through a workshop to build their own SoTL project.

(Speaker) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) Daniel R. Kennedy, Western New England University; (Speaker) Lauren A. O'Donnell, Duquesne University

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Increase Your Leadership Quotient! Strategies for Approaching Positive Change Using a “Consultant” Mindset

Administrative Services Section, Continuing Professional Development Section, Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Leadership development is necessary at all levels to ensure that organizations are developing in a healthy way. Administrators may approach positive change with their stakeholders (students, faculty, staff, and other-level administrator colleagues) using a variety of hierarchical constructs, possibly leading to resistance and conflict. Herein, we discuss the value of using a "consultant" mindset to first connect with stakeholders, identify common values, and favor superordinate goals over self-interest.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify key attributes of the “consultant” mindset.
  2. Apply the “consultant” mindset to case scenarios and vignettes.
  3. Compare and contrast the “consultant” mindset approach with the hierarchical, traditional administrator mindset.
  4. Imagine what results might look like when changing mindset to the “consultant” approach.
  5. Commit to one new behavior that can be integrated into leadership approaches when leading positive change and change leadership.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-109-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Michael J Rudolph, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Ahmd Azab, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Kim D. Tanzer, Western New England University; (Speaker) Jeremy A. Hughes, California Health Sciences University

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Leading for Impact: How to Engage Preceptors in Their Own Development

Experiential Education Section, Continuing Professional Development Section

Toronto (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Engaging a wide variety of preceptors in different practice areas and of different levels of experience in preceptor development can be a challenging task. The purpose of this session is to identify those hurdles and engage participants in brainstorming ways hurdles can be overcome. Attendees will have the opportunity to draw on the experiences of two unique institutions and their methods for creating and navigating how to structure training methodologies in regard to preceptor development.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Recognize common challenges associated with engaging preceptors in preceptor development.
  2. Describe methods employed for structuring and documenting continuing education and preceptor development.
  3. Identify content for a preceptor development program

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-110-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Valerie D Nolt, University of Michigan; (Speaker) Pam Walker, University of Michigan; (Speaker) Elizabeth Autry, University of Kentucky HealthCare; (Speaker) Cathy Pierce, University of Kentucky HealthCare; (Speaker) Paul C. Walker, University of Michigan

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Vaping and Juuling: Practical Understanding and Chemistry-Based Discussion of a Growing Public Health Concern.

Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group, Chemistry Section, Pharmacy Practice Section

Acapulco (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Vaping was introduced to the United States around 2006. Originally marketed as an alternative to traditional cigarettes, it has exploded into an industry appealing to more and more young/underage customers each year, culminating recently in the phenomenon of “juuling," an even more discreet method of vaping. In this session, we will discuss the devices used in vaping/juuling, compare vaping/juuling vs. smoking traditional cigarettes, and highlight the chemistry of the vaping solutions commonly used.

(Speaker) David J. Weldon, William Carey University; (Speaker) Paulo Carvalho, University of the Incarnate Word

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

PCAT Advisory Committee Meeting

Closed Meeting

Randolph 2 (Concourse Level, West Tower)

(Chair) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University

11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education Editorial Board Meeting and Luncheon

By Invitation Only

(Chair) Gayle A. Brazeau, Marshall University; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Lauren S. Schlesselman, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Nancy Fjortoft, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Daniel R. Malcom, Sullivan University

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Open Hearing of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session provides all meeting attendees the opportunity to hear the business coming before the Final Session of the House of Delegates. All attendees may comment on proposed policies, resolutions and other business.

(Chair) Laura M. Borgelt, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Michael L. Manolakis, Wingate University

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Flipping the Pre-Pharmacy Club Meeting: Building Innovative Recruitment Events

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, None of the above

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

The target audience includes college of pharmacy administrators, faculty, and staff interested in building innovative and interactive high school and undergraduate recruitment events. This session will focus on reworking the goals of recruitment, creating programming to build interest in pharmacy as a career, and strengthening local pipelines. Examples of hands-on activities will be demonstrated and a short-workshop will allow time to share other ideas.

(Speaker) Dustin T. Christensen-Grant, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Danielle A Gundrum, Roseman University of Health Sciences

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Time Flies When You’re Teaching: Exploring a Time Tracking Tool for Faculty, Students, and Beyond!

Pharmacy Practice Section, Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Toggl is a desktop/mobile application that can be utilized to track time spent on work- and project-related tasks. This free application is easily customized based on the user’s needs, whether they are faculty, administrators, or even students. The perceived benefits of time tracking include increasing focus, efficiency, self-monitoring, and self-reflection. Reporting features could also be used for workload conversations with administration. This session is intended for interested attendees from any setting within academia.

(Speaker) Stephanie L. Sibicky, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Brandon Dionne, Northeastern University

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

How to Use Your Science: Counseling Points and Auxiliary Labels

Biological Sciences Section, Chemistry Section, Pharmaceutics Section

Regency Ballroom A (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Delivery of quality patient-centered care requires that pharmacists understand the scientific rationale for the use of patient education tools including counseling points and auxiliary labels. Optimal therapeutic outcomes can only be achieved if patient compliance is maximized and potential drug-drug, drug-food, and/or drug-nutraceutical interactions are minimized. This presentation will guide basic and biomedical scientists to enhance student pharmacist awareness of the scientific rationale associated with the use of patient education tools.

(Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Susan L. Mercer, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Marc W. Harrold, Duquesne University

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Tackling PPCP Challenges: Tactics for Engaging Preceptors Through the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process

Experiential Education Section, Pharmacy Practice Section, Continuing Professional Development Section

Toronto (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

As Colleges and Schools implement the pharmacists’ patient care process (PPCP) across the curriculum, it is important to focus on both the didactic and experiential curriculum. Students spend approximately 1/3 of their time in experiential education, so exposing students effectively to the PPCP in experiential rotations is critical to ensuring consistency among future practitioners. Practice faculty, experiential education directors, and curriculum stakeholders should join us for this PPCP workshop to share ideas, tools, and leave with a plan for preceptor development.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss successful models of PPCP implementation at three member institutions
  2. Develop a plan for implementing PPCP model training for preceptors
  3. Develop a network of scholars who can advance the PPCP mode.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-111-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Janet H. Cooley, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Keri D. Hager, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Sara N. Trovinger, Manchester University; (Moderator) James Wheeler, The University of Tennessee

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Remediation Across the Continuum of Experiential Learning: A Team Approach

Experiential Education Section, Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Regency Ballroom B (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

Remediation of experiential rotations varies amongst programs with no clear common approach. In this session, presenters from three specialties outline a student-centered team approach to experiential remediation leveraging the diverse expertise of preceptors, faculty, and staff. Attendees will learn how to design, implement, and participate in remediation plans based upon student deficits in each of the four CAPE educational outcome domains. A variety of case scenarios will frame this interactive session.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the current body of evidence pertaining to experiential remediation.
  2. Use root cause analysis strategies to identify student learning deficits in each of the four CAPE education outcome domains.
  3. Identify other disciplines and professions that can contribute to the success of a student-specific remediation plan.
  4. Synthesize a student-specific remediation plan within the framework of the CAPE educational outcome domains.
  5. Implement strategies along the continuum of learning to maximize remediation success.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-112-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Marian Gaviola, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Meredith L. Howard, University of North Texas Health Science Center; (Speaker) Randy Martin, University of North Texas Health Science Center

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

“Grab Your Passport...And Fasten Your Seatbelt!” Adventures in Global Collaboration When Creating Educational Resources

Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group

Acapulco (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

We will share our experiences of creating innovative teaching resources with international partner universities. Using the shared experiences of a tripartite collaboration with University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Monash University (Australia) and University College London (UK), we will share benefits, challenges and considerations involved in creating teaching resources fit for utilization at each School of Pharmacy.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Outline the considerations for global collaboration with other Schools of Pharmacy.
  2. Describe the benefits and challenges of global collaboration when designing and developing teaching resources.
  3. Reflect on the effectiveness of your current international relationships.
  4. Develop an action plan to introduce international collaborations to your School of Pharmacy.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-113-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Heidi N. Anksorus, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Stefanie P. Ferreri, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) T Ng, UCL School of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Vivienne Mak, Monash University; (Moderator) Amanda C Savage, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Lawrencia Louise Brown, University College London

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Cultivating Intercultural Competence in Experiential Education: Strategies for Curricular Integration and Preceptor Development

Experiential Education Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Minority Faculty Special Interest Group

Michigan 1ABC (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Participants will learn strategies for evaluating cultural sensitivity displayed by students in introductory and advanced practice experiences, as well as identify how cultural sensitivity is embedded within Entrustable Professional Activities and professionalism evaluation processes. Information will be provided on how cultural competency development is integrated throughout the Pharm.D. curriculum. Additionally, this activity will provide information for improving one’s own intercultural competence and its importance in the preceptor roles of instructing, modeling, coaching, and facilitating.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify strategies for integrating cultural competency throughout the Pharm.D. curriculum.
  2. Understand how the preceptor roles of instructing, modeling, coaching, and facilitating impact intercultural competence development in students.
  3. Identify tools for culturally sensitive self-development.
  4. Apply criteria for enhancing preceptor evaluation of culturally competent care in practice.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-114-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Oscar W. Garza, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Raquel Rodriguez, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) L'Aurelle A. Johnson, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Mary McGuiggan, University of Minnesota

1:30 p.m.– 2:30 p.m.

Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA) Assessment Tools Within Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE)

Regency Ballroom C (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

EPAs are a novel assessment framework in pharmacy education that supports life-long learning. However, functionalization of EPAs within experiential education, particularly in IPPE, is not well understood. This session will provide participants with mechanisms for designing, implementing and utilizing EPAs as IPPE assessment tools across three colleges/schools of pharmacy.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the state of EPA utilization within IPPEs.
  2. Describe 3 different assessment methods incorporating EPAs within IPPEs.
  3. Discuss successes and challenges of implementing EPAs as an assessment construct within IPPEs.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-115-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Sheila M. Allen, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Elizabeth Trolli, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Mara A. Kieser, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Jennie B. Jarrett, University of Illinois at Chicago

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Got Skills? Training Student Pharmacists to be Effective Team Members

Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Developing teamwork skills requires longitudinal practice and feedback. Ideally, teamwork skills develop across all curricular components. However, simply creating collaborative learning experiences does not ensure team skills are developed. When you identify a student who is not yet team-ready, do you have the necessary tools to coach the individual or team? This workshop will increase faculty awareness of teamwork theory and tools that can be applied to individualized situations to develop student teamwork skills.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how components of team theory can be applied to classroom and experiential collaborative learning teams.
  2. Compare a variety of coaching strategies to develop team skills for individuals and teams.
  3. Apply strategies for team skill coaching to a variety of common scenarios in pharmacy education.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-116-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Michelle Z. Farland, University of Florida; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Will Ofstad, California Health Sciences University

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

In the Trenches of Curricular Integration: A Survival Guide

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Curricular integration occurs on a continuum. Achieving a high level of curricular integration that encompasses a strong blend of the basic and clinical sciences remains a challenge. High levels of curricular integration can only be achieved if faculty are supported to collaboratively design meaningful instruction. Two institutions compare support structures which include faculty development, guidance, project management, and formative evaluation. Faculty, administrator, and staff attendees will leave with practical strategies to overcome barriers and leverage existing support structures.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the value of reaching higher levels of curricular integration.
  2. Discuss barriers/challenges to achieving higher levels of curricular integration.
  3. Identify opportunities for increased levels of curricular integration within faculty teaching teams.
  4. Describe essential support structures and strategies for planning and implementing an integrated curriculum including establishing a clear mission and strong leadership.
  5. Apply lessons learned to their home institution.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-117-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) Bradley Wright, Auburn University; (Speaker) Karen Whalen, University of Florida; (Speaker) Karen F. Marlowe, Auburn University; (Speaker) Julaine Fowlin, Auburn University; (Speaker) Shane M. Ryan, University of Florida; (Speaker) Lori B. Hornsby, Auburn University

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Know Yourself, Know Your People - Engaging Teams Effectively

Administrative Services Section, Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Women Faculty Special Interest Group

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

The linkages and relationship between leadership and management is often discussed. While there is some balance to be employed, it is essential that leaders recognize their individual strengths weaknesses and values while also identifying the same for peers, supervisors and employees to successfully lead individuals, teams and organizations. Knowing people can result in greater team productivity. This session will explore differences in personalities, leadership types and levels and use case discussions to apply key principles.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Differentiate between leadership and management
  2. Describe Maxwell and Collin’s hierarchy of leadership
  3. Identify various styles of leadership
  4. Discuss how to engage with different personalities in a team
  5. Decide how to proceed when presented with a leadership situation.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-118-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Lisa Nissen, Quensland University of Technology; (Speaker) Toyin Tofade, Howard University

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Urgent Call for Primary Care Pharmacist Practitioners: Academic and Clinical Partnerships With Physician Organizations

Pharmacy Practice Section, Continuing Professional Development Section, Administrative Services Section

Regency Ballroom D (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

There is value of pharmacist practitioners embedded in primary care. One school will describe its Pharm.D. curriculum, intended to produce graduates for entrance into primary care. Another program will describe creation of Michigan Pharmacists Transforming Care and Quality Initiative resulting in increased number of ambulatory pharmacists (21 to 42) physician organizations across the state. American Medical Association STEPS Forward initiative, toolkit for physicians, focused on expansion of pharmacists in the ambulatory setting will be described.

(Speaker) George E. MacKinnon, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Hae Mi Choe, University of Michigan; (Speaker) Marie Brown, Rush University

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Bylaws and Policy Development Committee Executive Session

Closed Meeting

Monroe Boardroom 5 (Concourse Level, East Tower)

(Chair) Laura M. Borgelt, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Michael L. Manolakis, Wingate University

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Course Re-Boot: Applying Qualitative Assessment to Instructional Design Using the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process

Pharmacy Practice Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Assessment Special Interest Group

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

How can we identify factors that enhance as well as inhibit the effectiveness of courses that seek to support students in learning to apply the Pharmacist Patient Care Process (PPCP)? How can we make practical use of those factors as an input into course revisions? In this session, the presenters will discuss systematic qualitative approaches that provide strong foundations for driving design improvements in the context of a capstone course that promotes the PPCP.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how qualitative analysis can identify challenges and benefits in the design of a PPCP course.
  2. Develop a plan for collecting and analyzing qualitative data to support future PPCP course revisions.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-061-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Beth Phillips, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Russ Palmer, The University of Georgia

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Two Scoops for That Scholarship? Double-Dipping in Your Research

Pharmacy Practice Section, Experiential Education Section, Administrative Services Section

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Many times we can be on the scholarship struggle bus. Finding time to generate, execute, and write our research endeavors can be a daunting task. In this session we will explore efficient ways to capture scholarship in our daily activities. A discussion centered in double-dipping strategies will help participants get the most bang for their scholarship buck! Lastly, we will discuss diligent writing practices and strategies to be purposeful in planning our scholarship.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify opportunities for maximizing faculty scholarship efficiency.
  2. Create an attendee specific plan for pursuing multiple venues in a single project.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-119-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Sarah A. Nisly, Wingate University; (Speaker) Alex N. Isaacs, Purdue University

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Beverage Break

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

3:30 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Tuesday General Session: Relationships Matter in Healthcare – The Key to Building Healthcare Teams that Value Pharmacists

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

As healthcare systems experience a transition from a focus on volume of care to value, and as the delivery of that care increasingly occurs through interprofessional teams, there is a critical opportunity for academic institutions to catalyze efforts that establish collaborations between pharmacists and physicians in a manner that produces value to patients, providers and payers. Drawing on her experience as a primary care clinician as well as community organizer, Dr. Mader will not only highlight the timely value proposition of the clinician-pharmacist partnership to improve care delivery, but how to lead efforts that create broader integration of clinical pharmacists on the frontlines of primary care. Joining her will be Dr. Morris-Singer, who will partner with Dr. Mader to showcase a variety of leadership and advocacy practices for the next generation of pharmacy practitioners and academic centers, and how to incorporate tried and true “change-agentry” strategies into our day-to-day lives to accelerate reform.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Understand the unique value proposition of the clinician pharmacist on the primary care team in a value-based system.
  2. Describe essential leadership practices and grassroots advocacy strategies that can be applied in healthcare settings to accelerate reform and build community.
  3. Identify specific action steps they can take to accelerate integration of clinical pharmacists into primary care teams. .

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-134-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Moderator) David D. Allen, University of Mississippi; (Moderator) Todd D. Sorensen, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Andrew Morris-Singer, M.D., Primary Care Progress; (Speaker) Kari Mader, University of Colorado

5:15 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Closing Reception

Grand Ballroom and Columbus Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Wednesday

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

AACP Registration & Help Desk

Grand Ballroom Registration (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Please check-in and pick-up your name badge for Pharmacy Education 2019 here. Staff will be available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app and ensure you're plugged into AACP Connect, the online, private community exclusively for member collaboration.

7:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Grand Suite 5 (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Taking care of business sometimes requires taking care of yourself in the process. AACP is making it easy with the PharmCAS R&R Lounge—designed to offer attendees a brief but much-needed respite from crowds, noise and other common meeting stresses, while keeping you fresh for the business of learning and networking. Kick up your feet, check your e-mail, charge your phone, tablet or laptop and unwind. There will be four laptop kiosks available on a first-come, first-served basis. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment. With support from our sponsor, PharmCAS, powered by Liaison, the lounge services are complimentary so make time to stop by for a little R&R!

7:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m.

Test2Learn Community-based Pharmacogenomics Certificate & Train-the-Trainer Programs, Hosted by the University of Pittsburgh

Acapulco (Ballroom Level, West Tower)

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Keeping Seniors Safe Through Student Interprofessional Home Assessments: A Fresh Meals on Wheels Collaboration

Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section, Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Best practices and lessons learned will be shared from a unique collaboration between Fresh Meals on Wheels and Concordia University-Wisconsin aimed at keeping Seniors safe in their homes through student interprofessionial home visits in Sheboygan County, WI. Those involved in experiential and interprofessional education will gain insight into the experiences of students and seniors through this collaboration and will receive a template for the development of similar interprofessional service learning experiences within their own institutions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe a process for engaging a community partner to create a student interprofessional service learning program designed to keep seniors safe in their homes.
  2. Identify best practices and lessons learned when creating interprofessional service learning experiences which allow for student participation in the management of, and health promotion for patients.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-120-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Nancy Stoehr, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Travis Suss, Concordia University Wisconsin

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Lessons Learned: Implementing a Centralized Excused Absence System

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Administrative Services Section

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This presentation will describe the University of Maryland’s transition to a centralized excused absence management system and the key lessons from early implementation. Speakers will discuss (1) the development of policies and procedures to govern absences, (2) the web-based system constructed to manage the process, and (3) the benefits and challenges associated with adoption from an administrator, faculty, and student perspective.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast faculty and centralized management of student excused absences.
  2. Identify the implications of absences on academic progression, student wellbeing, and career development.
  3. Describe challenges associated with policy transitions associated with excused absences.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-121-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Cherokee Layson-Wolf, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Shannon R. Tucker, University of Maryland

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Data Overload? Three Approaches to Implementing Data-Driven Changes Using the AACP Curriculum Quality Survey

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Randolph 1AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

The AACP Curriculum Quality Surveys (student, faculty, alumni, preceptor) are useful tools to gather data for programmatic assessment and accreditation. However, determining how to optimize the data can be challenging. Three schools will present their unique approaches, covering the areas of sampling, response rates, benchmarks, communicating results and creating action plans. This session is relevant to those working in the areas of assessment, administration, and curriculum or those interested in learning about the surveys.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain why a comprehensive plan for interpreting results from the Curriculum Quality Surveys is valuable to an institution’s assessment plan.
  2. Describe common strategies used to overcome barriers to survey research, including AACP surveys (e.g., sampling, response rate, limitations in interpreting).
  3. Explain strategies for the utilization of internal and external benchmarks.
  4. Discuss strategies to communicate findings to key stakeholders and develop action plans.
  5. Develop or modify a survey assessment plan to make it systematic and to promote continuous quality improvement.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-122-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jaime L. Maerten-Rivera, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Fred Doloresco, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Lisa M. Meny, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Mandy R. Seiferlein, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Aleda M. Chen, Cedarville University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Assessment of Student Readiness to Enter APPEs: The Preceptors’ Perspectives

Assessment Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Crystal B ( Lobby Level, West Tower)

Standards 2016, Key Elements 24.3 and 25.8, require programs to provide evidence of student APPE-readiness. Accordingly, programs have defined APPE-readiness in the context of their own curriculum but may not have received input from non-faculty preceptors. Speakers from 3 programs will share study results regarding preceptor expectations of student APPE-preparedness and corresponding curriculum revision(s) and preceptor development programs implemented. Target audience includes members of Assessment and Curriculum SIGs and Experiential Education Section.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Apply successful strategies for collecting non-faculty preceptor feedback with regards to student APPE-readiness
  2. Detect opportunities to use EPAs to collect data on APPE-readiness in their own programs
  3. Implement preceptor development programs and pursue curricular revision based on preceptor feedback
  4. Recognize challenges, pitfalls and logistics of collecting preceptor feedback
  5. Adapt this program delivery as a professional development workshop in their own institution.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-123-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Ashok E. Philip, Union University; (Speaker) Suzanne Carbonaro, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Scott D. Greene, University of the Sciences; (Speaker) Mark A. Stephens, Union University; (Speaker) Roopali Sharma, Touro College of Pharmacy-New York

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Changing the Profession Through Entrepreneurship and Innovation Education

Social and Administrative Sciences Section, Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

This session will bring together faculty who take diverse approaches to introducing student pharmacists to innovation and entrepreneurship in the classroom and through unique business planning experiences. A panel of course directors will present how they approach teaching business planning and assisting students in appreciating and experimenting with the process of innovation. Following discussion and comparing of approaches, an interactive learning session will charge groups with developing a value proposition.

(Speaker) David A. Holdford, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Stephen F. Eckel, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) T. Joseph Mattingly, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Justin Gatwood, The University of Tennessee

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Mindfulness for Stress Reduction in Pharmacy Faculty

Pharmacy Practice Section, Continuing Professional Development Section

Crystal A (Lobby Level, West Tower)

Mindfulness-based interventions have been shown to combat emotional stress and reduce burnout symptoms. Pharmacist burnout has been reported at rates of 50-60%. In academia, job turnover has been linked to excessive workload, which can contribute to rates of burnout. In this session, participants will learn the basics of mindfulness, its benefits, and how to utilize mindfulness in daily life.

(Speaker) Brianna McQuade, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Jenna Bauer, University of Illinois at Chicago

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Taking a Leap to Reliable, Objective Assessment of Non-Cognitive Pharmacist Attributes With Situational Judgement Tests

Assessment Special Interest Group, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group

Crystal C (Lobby Level, West Tower)

Assessment of non-cognitive attributes is challenging. Situational judgement tests (SJTs) represent a measurement methodology for assessing non-cognitive attributes and may overcome the reliability, validity, and feasibility issues of alternative evaluation methods (e.g. reflections, multiple mini interviews, observations). SJTs examinees review common scenarios encountered in practice and provide judgements on pre-determined response options. This workshop will examine implementation of SJTs at two institutions and invite participants to draft a scenario for an SJT.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize research evidence for Situational Judgement Tests (SJT)
  2. Explain the purpose and structure of an SJT.
  3. Describe current use of SJTs within health sciences education through two case study descriptions.
  4. Create an SJT scenario, designed to measured non-cognitive pharmacist attributes.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-124-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, University of Florida; (Speaker) Michelle Z. Farland, University of Florida; (Speaker) Charlotte Flaxman, Work Psychology Group; (Speaker) Michael D. Wolcott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

We Are Holistically Admitting Our Students, How Are We Providing Holistic Support Post-Matriculation?

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Social and Administrative Sciences Section, Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

Columbus AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Holistic learning support aims to improve the quality of the educational experience for students facing challenges associated with professional or educational goals, through proactive and preventive measures. This is accomplished through early identification, assessment, and intervention related to educational achievement and other domains including physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. During this session we will define holistic support, present techniques used by various professional programs, and discuss case studies to demonstrate holistic support with different student populations.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the types of resources students may need to support their success holistically while enrolled in a professional degree program.
  2. Identify potential barriers that can deter students from requesting or accessing support.
  3. Determine how to support a student who may benefit from holistic resources or guidance.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-125-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Jennifer D. Robinson, Washington State University; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Adams, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Kassandra M. Bartelme, Concordia University Wisconsin

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Developing a Patient-Centered Care Mindset: Hands On and Experiential Learning During Pharmacy Orientation

Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group, Administrative Services Section, Pharmacy Practice Section

Columbus GH (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Orientation is designed to help students shift their mindset and prepare them for pharmacy school. This session will focus on how three pharmacy programs are helping students transition into professional programs by introducing patient-centered care activities such as blood pressure monitoring, BLS training, Narcan training, point of care testing, and more as part of the orientation process to expose students to the appropriate mindset in embracing direct patient care, and hands-on preparation for experiential learning.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe current efforts among three pharmacy programs for incorporating active learning in orientation programming.
  2. Develop strategies to apply active learning and hands-on training to assist in introducing new pharmacy students to the profession.
  3. Compare and contrast different ways of incorporating hands on learning depending on local health issues, program mission, and state intern regulations.
  4. Identify innovative activities that can help students shift their mindsets from students to future healthcare providers during orientation.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-126-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) David G. Fuentes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Helen C. Park, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) C. Leiana L. Oswald, Roseman University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Renee M. DeHart, Samford University

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Sign-In

Group Office Registration Desk (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

All delegates are required to sign in on Sunday and Wednesday for the Credentials Committee to determine the quorum for business.

(Speaker) Craig D. Cox, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center; (Speaker) Russell B. Melchert, University of Missouri-Kansas City

 

Beverage Break

Grand Ballroom Foyer (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Faculty Driven Development of a Psychometrically Sound Two-Part Matriculation Examination

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Curricular redesign entails appropriate assessment at both the course and programmatic levels. This program is intended for educators and assessment directors and will discuss development and delivery of our programmatic assessment, which includes two summative competency examinations. Both examinations mark matriculation from the didactic curriculum to APPEs and include: (1) an objective examination at the end of the second professional year, and (2) an objective structured clinical examination at the end of the third year.

(Speaker) Mandy M. Jones, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Esther P. Black, University of Kentucky

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Preventative Screening for Opioid Misuse and Accidental Overdose: Implementation of a Statewide Pharmacy CPD Program

Continuing Professional Development Section, Substance Use Disorder Special Interest Group, Public Health Special Interest Group

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session is designed for faculty and preceptors involved with ambulatory care, community pharmacy, public health, continuing professional development, and/or substance use disorder. Attendees will learn how to successfully design and implement a statewide continuing professional development program to address a public health issue. Presenters will describe their successful program called ONE (Opioid and Naloxone Education) Rx which prepares and educates pharmacists to screen for opioid misuse and accidental overdose.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss how to implement patient screening within the community pharmacy to prevent opioid misuse and accidental overdose.
  2. Discuss how to design, deliver and implement a statewide continuing professional development program to address a public health issue.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-127-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Elizabeth T. Skoy, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Amy Werremeyer, North Dakota State University

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

APPE-Ready, Set, Go – Two Different Approaches to Ensuring Student Competence and Confidence

Assessment Special Interest Group, Curriculum Special Interest Group, Experiential Education Section

Roosevelt 3AB (Concourse Level, East Tower)

Palm Beach Atlantic University and University of Maryland utilize a variety of formative and high-stakes assessments to measure development of student knowledge, skills, attitudes, and confidence. Together these attributes comprise the necessary foundational competence to start the APPE curriculum as prescribed by ACPE Standard 25.8. Discussion includes innovative strategies to incorporate Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs), ACPE Standards 1-4, and ACPE Guidelines Appendix A pre-APPE core domains. Suggested audience includes assessment, curriculum, and experiential learning.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Articulate components of an APPE readiness assessment strategy that measures both skills-based and attitudes-based competencies.
  2. Identify common barriers and potential solutions for assessing APPE readiness.
  3. Discuss different approaches to validating APPE readiness assessments.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-128-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Erenie Guirguis, Palm Beach Atlantic University; (Speaker) Mariette Sourial, Palm Beach Atlantic University; (Speaker) Jonathan Jackson, Palm Beach Atlantic University; (Speaker) Lisa Lebovitz, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Kathleen J. Pincus, University of Maryland

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Creation of Organizational Initiatives to Cultivate Joy, Resilience, and Well-Being in Pharmacy Education

Assessment Special Interest Group, Leadership Development Special Interest Group, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Crystal B ( Lobby Level, West Tower)

Increasing emphasis has been placed on improving clinician resilience and well-being due to concerning rates of burnout, depression, and suicide in healthcare professionals. Session participants will learn how multiple institutions have created initiatives that promote a culture of health and well-being for students, staff, and faculty. Participants will learn about practical strategies for performing an environmental scan of current culture and incorporating assessment tools, educational programs, and workplace wellness into their own organizational initiatives.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Articulate why resilience is an essential leadership characteristic for pharmacy educators to possess.
  2. Select an appropriate assessment tool that provides meaningful evaluation of resilience, well-being, and burnout in pharmacy educators and pharmacy students.
  3. Describe initiatives based within schools and colleges of pharmacy that include assessment, curricular changes, and organizational support for improving the well-being of pharmacy students, staff, and faculty.
  4. Strategize interventions that can be adapted for use within schools and colleges of pharmacy to promote a culture of resilience and well-being in pharmacy education.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-129-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Seena L. Haines, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Nicholas E. Hagemeier, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Jacqueline M Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Moderator and Speaker) Mollie A. Scott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Curricular Design within Skills Laboratory Courses to Enhance Student Wellness and Resiliency Across Multiple Institutions

Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group, Pharmacy Practice Section, Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Crystal A (Lobby Level, West Tower)

Self-care is the foundation to cultivating well-being and resiliency. This session provides participants with ideas for designing and implementing wellness education for students, patients, and faculty with the focus of improving wellness behaviors. Wellness activities consistent with ACPE Accreditation Standards 2 and 4 and implemented in skills laboratories at three different colleges will be shared. Participants will also have the opportunity to create a wellness action plan.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe wellness activities and mindfulness tools that can be incorporated into a laboratory course to promote student wellness and resilience.
  2. Examine the connection of student mindful awareness as a method to enhance patient centered care within the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process.
  3. Analyze the time efficient implementation of gratitude and mindful awareness training into a lab course series, the student response to the efforts and future directions planned.
  4. Evaluate an approach to teaching students skills on the assessment of mental health and well-being.
  5. Outline a wellness action plan for personal and professional development.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-130-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Brittany L. Riley, Marshall University; (Speaker) Elizabeth A. Buckley, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Kimberly S. Illingworth Plake, Purdue University; (Speaker) Jamie Woodyard, Purdue University; (Speaker) Chelsea M. Anderson, Purdue University

9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Digital Accessibility: Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Library and Information Science Section, Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Grand Ballroom AB (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

With the increasingly complex digital content provided by pharmacy educators, the provision of well-designed and accessible course material enables more effective learning for a diverse student body. This presentation highlights effective methods for improving digital accessibility, discusses student perspectives related to accessibility, and reviews challenges faced by educators. This session will help educators meet the needs of students and satisfy legal accessibility standards. Participants will also practice developing accessible course content in small groups.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify at least 5 methods to increase the digital accessibility of course material
  2. Recall different digitally available alternative formats for course documents
  3. Discuss common obstacles encountered by faculty related to digital accessibility
  4. Create more accessible digital materials for learner.

Application-based (0581-0000-19-131-L04-P 1.00 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Melissa Hortman, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Scott W. Bragg, Medical University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Brianne L. Dunn, University of South Carolina; (Moderator) Jason S. Haney, Medical University of South Carolina

9:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Session

Grand Ballroom CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

The final business of the 2019 House of Delegates will occur at this session. Delegates will be seated only if they signed in between 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. on Wednesday morning.

(Speaker) Michael L. Manolakis, Wingate University; (Chair) Laura M. Borgelt, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

"Memory Boost": Retrieval Practice to Promote Pharmacy Student Knowledge Retention via Mobile Learning

Curriculum Special Interest Group, Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Columbus IJKL (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

Pharmacy student knowledge retention is a concern. Limited literature has been published describing use of retrieval practice in schools of pharmacy as an active learning strategy. Despite low reported use within US schools of pharmacy, retrieval practice has a longstanding record of promoting knowledge retention across many disciplines and learner populations. This session will detail the process, results and growth of the facilitated retrieval practice "memory boost" initiative at the McWhorter School of Pharmacy.

(Speaker) Peter J. Hughes, Samford University; (Speaker) Michael G. Kendrach, Samford University

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Teaching and Assessing the Core EPA Practice Manager Domain in the Didactic Classroom

Pharmacy Practice Section

Columbus CDEF (Ballroom Level, East Tower)

This session targets faculty interested in addressing the AACP Core Professional Entrustable Activities Practice Manager Domain in their didactic curriculum. Participants will learn about two different educational designs for teaching and assessing this Domain in the classroom setting. They will participate in the Jeopardy-style interview activity themselves and learn about assessment designs to implement in their curriculum for this Domain.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the Core EPA Practice Manager Domain.
  2. Identify challenges and opportunities in their curriculum to implement and assess students in the didactic curriculum.
  3. Participate in one student engagement activity design during the session.
  4. Assess their own curriculum for areas of student assessment in the Practice Manager Domain.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-19-132-L04-P 0.50 Contact Hour)

(Speaker) Lauren M. Caldas, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Cortney M Mospan, Wingate University