INsight 2020 Programming

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Schedule

Friday

3:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

New Deans ACPE Orientation

Rio Mar Salon 7

Board members and staff of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education will lead this interactive session to provide new deans with important insights into both Pharm.D. and continuing education program accreditation. Issues related to preparing for focused and comprehensive accreditation visits/reviews, substantive changes and related accreditation matters will be covered. A reception hosted by ACPE will follow the working session beginning at 5:00 p.m.

ACPE Staff

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

New Deans ACPE Orientation Reception

Rio Mar Salon 8

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

AACP Board of Directors Reception with ALFP & Special Guests

Beach Front Deck

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Research Symposium Reception

Ocean Terrace

Research Symposium participants are invited to attend.

Saturday

7:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.

Registration & Information Desk

The Atrium Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

6:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

AACP Council of Sections (COS) Administrative Board Meeting

Egret

A closed meeting of the elected officers of the Council of Sections.

Chair: David A. Holdford, M.S., Ph.D., FAPhA , Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science, School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

AACP Council of Faculties (COF) Administrative Board Meeting

Heron

A closed meeting of the elected officers of the Council of Faculties.

Chair: Craig D. Cox, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, Vice Chair, Experiential Programs and Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

8:00 a.m.–Noon

CEO Deans Roundtable

Caribbean Salon 2 & 3

CEO Deans: Join your peers at this special session where you’ll discuss relevant and timely topics germane to your administrative role, pharmacy academia and the profession. This four-hour meeting, followed by a networking lunch, will allow time to discuss 3-4 current topics of concern to CEO Deans (final topics will be advertised by November 2019). This meeting is open to CEO Deans of colleges and schools of pharmacy only, therefore no representative(s) for any CEO Dean should be identified to attend.

8:30 a.m.–2 p.m.

Research Symposium

8:30 a.m.–Noon

Research Symposium Morning Session

Rio Mar Salon 7 & 8

Every institution offers strengths, challenges and opportunities for research unique to the local environment. Join researchers and research leaders from colleges and schools of pharmacy at the AACP 2020 Research Symposium for a one-day meeting focused on maximizing your institution’s potential to support and sustain high-impact research. Symposium participants will share success stories and good practices in fostering faculty researcher development, leveraging local resources, and building local and distant collaborations and networks. Deans, department chairs and faculty with responsibility for research leadership at their schools are encouraged to attend. Registration includes reception on Friday evening, coffee break and lunch on Saturday.

Brian T. Tsuji, Pharm.D., Professor and Associate Dean, Clinical and Translational Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; Lou Woodley, Ph.D., Center for Scientific Collaboration and Community Engagement

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Research Symposium Coffee Break

Rio Mar Salon 7 & 8

Noon-1:00 p.m.

Research Symposium Networking Lunch

Rio Mar Salon 9 & 10

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Research Symposium Afternoon Session

Rio Mar Salon 7 & 8

Every institution offers strengths, challenges and opportunities for research unique to the local environment. Join researchers and research leaders from colleges and schools of pharmacy at the AACP 2020 Research Symposium for a one-day meeting focused on maximizing your institution’s potential to support and sustain high-impact research. Symposium participants will share success stories and good practices in fostering faculty researcher development, leveraging local resources, and building local and distant collaborations and networks. Deans, department chairs and faculty with responsibility for research leadership at their schools are encouraged to attend. Registration includes reception on Friday evening, coffee break and lunch on Saturday.

Salisa Westrick, Ph.D., Department Head and Sterling Professor, Health Outcomes Research and Policy, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University

Noon–1:00 p.m.

CEO Deans Lunch

Ocean Terrace

Join your colleagues to continue discussions from the morning over lunch. Additionally, for those new to the position of CEO Dean, experienced deans will be available to answer questions about leading a college/school of pharmacy, as well as AACP programs in areas including institutional research and effectiveness, leadership, research/scholarship, interprofessional education and advocacy. Materials for new deans will be made available in AACP Connect.

2:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Connections and Conversations: Associate and Assistant Deans

Rio Mar Salon 1–5

Connect with other Assistant and Associate Deans while engaging in roundtable discussions on leadership team dynamics, contracts and partnerships, workplace safety education and curricular revision implementation. 

2:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Connections and Conversations: Department Chairs

Caribbean Salon 2 & 3

Participants attending the department chairs networking session will engage with other attendees using a discussion protocol approach in order to share experiences and collective recommendations regarding work-related challenges that impact departments in schools and colleges of pharmacy.

Moderator: Reginald F. Frye, Pharm.D., Ph.D., FCCP, Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida

4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Success! Strategies and Perspectives to Facilitate Effective Change

Rio Mar Salon 1–5

Technology and innovation are changing at an accelerated rate. As a result, the way that healthcare is provided is evolving and the preparation that graduates need to be successful in the healthcare field is too. At the same time, pedagogy changes, research approaches change, organizational cultures change, and our students’ tendencies and expectations change. To respond to these transformations, educational institutions and healthcare organizations must adapt to remain relevant and successful at pursuing their missions. Change within organizations requires leaders to cast a convincing vision for adjustments, develop effective plans for modifications, clearly articulate the adaptations needed, and facilitate changes in the way that people work. Change within educational and healthcare organizations requires people to evolve. Recognizing the roles that individuals play and then motivating them to accept and implement the necessary changes are essential to the success of any plan. This session will cover known strategies, frameworks, perspectives and actions that can be used to facilitate change.

At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe methods used to identify opportunities for change
  2. List the elements of change management frameworks that are useful in facilitating change
  3. Describe the threats to successful change and strategies to manage them
  4. Describe factors that will contribute to successful change and how to facilitate them
  5. Recognize and identify the ways to combat fear and protect themselves while facilitating change

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-20-006-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Noel E. Wilkin, Ph.D., Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Professor and Research Professor, The University of Mississippi

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Welcome Reception

Mirabella Gardens

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

CEO Deans Reception

Vista Verde Gardens

Sunday

6:30 a.m.–7:30 a.m.

Sunrise Yoga

Beach Front Deck

This is a free moving yoga class that welcomes all experience levels on the beach. This class will focus on deep breathing with synchronized movement to warm up your body, increase strength, circulation, flexibility, concentration, and balance as the instructor takes you along the beachfront. Mats are not required.

7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Registration & Information Desk

The Atrium Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Keynote: One Voice—Our Profession United

Caribbean Ballroom

The presentation will provide an overview from a national/federal perspective, the disruption taking place in the healthcare system and the pharmacy profession, including emerging technologies, expanded care delivery, changing payment models and provider shortages, resulting in an urgency among stakeholders across the healthcare ecosystem to transform to remain relevant. Pharmacy education and most important, its top leaders, play an indispensable role in preparing the profession and students to address this accelerating change. This is a narrow window of opportunity for leaders to align around a commonality so pharmacists can help people live healthier, better lives.

Rear Admiral Pamela Schweitzer, Pharm.D., Assistant Surgeon General and Chief Pharmacist Officer of the United States Public Health Service (ret.)

9:30 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Networking and Beverage Break

Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

9:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

ALFP Debate #1

Rio Mar Salon 1–4

The ALFP Fellows 2019–2020 Cohort presents a debate on the topic "'OSCE’ should be a required component of the national pharmacy licensure exam.” In true debate style, two teams of Fellows will present opposing sides of the issue. Opportunity for discussion, and questions and answers from the audience will be provided.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the use of professional debate arguing skills for application in leadership interactions.
  2. Assess the design, value and use of professional debate arguing in a team environment.
  3. Analyze the value and ramifications for OSCEs being a required component of the national pharmacy licensure exam.

Application-based (0581-0000-20-007-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

ALFP Fellows 2019-2020 Cohort Moderator: Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

9:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

International Best Practices in the Integration of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Into Organizational Cultures: Lessons Learned from Around the Globe

Rio Mar Salon 5

Science and medicine continue to be challenged with cultures that are explicitly or implicitly exclusionary to significant portions of the population. Failures to actively recruit, retain and promote women, people of color, members of the LGBTQ2S+ community, aboriginal people and people with disabilities is well known to lead to lower quality outputs and missed opportunities for innovation. Addressing systemic structural barriers to inclusion is complex and requires context-dependent systems-level approaches. The UK, Ireland, Australia, the U.S. and Canada have adopted evidence-based, data-driven programs that seek cultural organizational change in science and medicine by developing specific action plans with measurable goals. These programs (Athena SWAN, SAGE, SEA Change and Dimensions) will be described in this presentation and best (and worst) practices will be highlighted.

Imogen R. Coe, Ph.D., Professor, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Drug Discovery of MBQ-167: From Intellectual Property to Commercialization

Rio Mar Salon 1–4

Scientists from the University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy have created a drug discovery and development program to conduct bench-to-bedside translational research for new therapies to prevent metastasis in cancer patients. The researchers aligned academic research with an outstanding interdisciplinary collaborative team among the areas of pharmaceutical and clinical sciences, molecular biology, industry and entrepreneurship. In this presentation, participants will describe how to develop step-by-step a research program from a new drug, intellectual property and commercialization.

At the completion of this activity, the participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the steps associated with pre-clinical and clinical research.
  2. Develop a commercialization plan for a research program.

Eliud Hernández, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Puerto Rico; Cornelis Vlaar, Ph.D., Chair and Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Puerto Rico

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Successful Leadership Transition Strategies—Helpful Tips from Leaders at All Levels to Create an Environment for Success

Rio Mar Salon 5

Transitioning from a faculty member role to any administrative role requires a shift in mindset that allows the faculty member to adopt a broader lens in how s/he approaches organizational initiatives, interactions with colleagues, student relationships and more. Having an infrastructure in place that provides support and development during transition is critical. Development, formal and informal training, coaching and mentorship can all play a major role in developing into an effective leader.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify pitfalls with new and transitioning leaders.
  2. Apply knowledge of pitfalls of new/transitioning leaders to create correctors and strategies to excel.
  3. Compare and contrast the administrative success of new leaders who have the appropriate infrastructure for the transition to new leaders who do not (including: training, formal education, mentorship, coaching etc.)
  4. Take a brief inventory to uncover insights about what you might need most related to transitioning into a leadership role.
  5. Commit to one new behavior that can be integrated into your preparation to take on a new leadership role, or make a new start.

Application-based (0581-0000-20-008-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Ahmd Azab, Pharm.D., MS, Vice Chair and Assistant Professor, Clinical Sciences Department, California Health Sciences University; Robert D. Beckett, Pharm.D., R.Ph., BCPS, Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice; Director, Drug Information Center, College of Pharmacy, Natural and Health Sciences, Manchester University; David G. Fuentes, Pharm.D., MSOL, SHRM-CP, EdDc, Executive Associate Dean, College of Pharmacy, California Health Sciences University; Jeremy Hughes, Pharm.D., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Enrollment, Associate Professor, Clinical Sciences Department, College of Pharmacy, California Health Sciences University; Darin C. Ramsey, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, Associate Professor, Director of Assessment, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Butler University

Noon–2:00 p.m.

Town Hall and Lunch

Rio Mar Salon 6–10

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

ALFP Debate #2

Rio Mar Salom 1–4

The ALFP Fellows 2019-2020 Cohort presents a debate on the topic “Pharmacy schools should do more to address the dwindling quality of applicants.” In true debate style, two teams of Fellows will present opposing sides of the issue. Opportunity for discussion, and questions and answers from the audience will be provided.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the use of professional debate arguing skills for application in leadership interactions.
  2. Assess the design, value and use of professional debate arguing in a team environment.
  3. Analyze the value and ramifications of pharmacy schools doing more to address the dwindling quality of applicants.

Application-based (0581-0000-20-009-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

ALFP Fellows 2019-2020 Cohort Moderator: Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Advancing Research at Your Institution by Using Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Resources

Rio Mar Salon 5

Efforts to conduct clinical and translational research requires well-prepared and competent teams of principal investigators (PIs) and clinical research professionals (CRPs). The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium was formed to advance the development, demonstration, and dissemination of critical training resources for the education and career development of these study teams. However, silos still exist that may disproportionally affect team members, especially in regions of the country without ready access to CTSA resources. Therefore the focus of this presentation will be on how to colleges of pharmacy can access CTSA developed educational resources to advance research education at their institution to facilitate CAPE Educational Guidelines. Furthermore, this presentation will outline how use of an e-portfolio system may facilitate career development for not only faculty, but also students and residents seeking career advancement.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. State the purpose of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium.
  2. State an example for each of the different phases of translational research.
  3. Discuss the ways in which the CTSA developed research education resources can be implemented at their college of pharmacy.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-20-010-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

Vicki L. Ellingrod, Pharm.D., FCCP, John Gideon Searle Professor of Pharmacy and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education, College of Pharmacy; Professor of Psychiatry, Medical School; and Adjunct Professor of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan

3:00 p.m–3:15 p.m.

Beverage Break

Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

AACP Council of Deans (COD) Administrative Board Meeting

Caribbean Ballroom

A closed meeting of the elected officers of the Council of Deans.

Chair: Russell B. Melchert, Ph.D., R.Ph., Dean and Professor, Division of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Monday

6:30 a.m.–7:30 a.m.

Sunrise Yoga

Beach Front Deck

This is a free moving yoga class that welcomes all experience levels on the beach. This class will focus on deep breathing with synchronized movement to warm up your body, increase strength, circulation, flexibility, concentration, and balance as the instructor takes you along the beachfront. Mats are not required.

7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Registration & Information Desk

The Atrium Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

8:30 a.m–9:30 a.m.

ACPE Organizational Update and Listening Session

Caribbean Ballroom

This session will provide an update on ACPE activities. In addition, input from the Academy will be solicited on topics related to ACPE.

Janet P. Engle, Pharm.D., Ph.D. (Hon), FAPhA, FNAP, Executive Director, ACPE

9:30 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Beverage Break

Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

9:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

ALFP Debate #3

Rio Mar Salon 1–4

The ALFP Fellows 2019-2020 Cohort presents a debate on the topic “Pharmacy schools are responding appropriately to pharmacists' concerns of a shrinking job market.” In true debate style, two teams of Fellows will present opposing sides of the issue. Opportunity for discussion, and questions and answers from the audience will be provided.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the use of professional debate arguing skills for application in leadership interactions.
  2. Assess the design, value and use of professional debate arguing in a team environment.
  3. Analyze the value and ramifications of pharmacy schools responding appropriately to pharmacists' concerns of a shrinking job market.

Application-based (0581-0000-20-011-L04-P, 1.00 Contact Hour)

ALFP Fellows 2019-2020 Cohort Moderator: Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

9:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Creating A Positive Emotional Culture

Rio Mar Salon 5

At this session, Mandy O’Neill, Ph.D., will draw on 10 years of published research conducted in healthcare organizations, Fortune 500 corporations and global technology firms, to describe how individuals and organizations can better manage burnout through engagement in business practices, work relationships, and culture change initiatives that cultivate a positive emotional culture, leading to improved employee well-being, higher functioning teams and improved financial performance. She will also highlight evidence-based techniques that individual contributors and managers can integrate into their daily work practices to increase personal and professional success.

Olivia (Mandy) O'Neill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Management, Senior Scientist at the Center for the Advancement of Well-Being, George Mason University

11:00 a.m–12:15 p.m.

Micro-sessions: Advancing Interprofessional Practice with Physicians and Other Healthcare Professions

Rio Mar Salon 1–4

Packing information and insight on a topic into a 10-minute segment, micro-sessions provide a brief overview of a topic through a 7-minute presentation and 3-minute question-and-answer period. These sessions are short and provide meeting attendees with the opportunity to hear a wide range of approaches to educational leadership. Choose to stay in one room the whole time, or move around to hear a little bit on each topic.

Moderator: Kelly R. Ragucci, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, Vice President of Professional Development, AACP

11:00 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Micro-sessions: Learning Experiences to Promote Professional Identity Formation in Student Pharmacists

Rio Mar Salon 5

Packing information and insight on a topic into a 10-minute segment, micro-sessions provide a brief overview of a topic through a 7-minute presentation and 3-minute question-and-answer period. These sessions are short and provide meeting attendees with the opportunity to hear a wide range of approaches to educational leadership. Choose to stay in one room the whole time, or move around to hear a little bit on each topic.

Moderator: Libby J. Ross, M.A., Senior Director of Student Affairs, AACP

11:00 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Micro-sessions: Academic-practice Partnerships Designed to Accelerate the Transformation of a Workforce Prepared to Assume Responsibility for Society’s Medication Use Needs in 2030

Caribbean Salon 2

Packing information and insight on a topic into a 10-minute segment, micro-sessions provide a brief overview of a topic through a 7-minute presentation and 3-minute question-and-answer period. These sessions are short and provide meeting attendees with the opportunity to hear a wide range of approaches to educational leadership. Choose to stay in one room the whole time, or move around to hear a little bit on each topic.

Moderator: Melissa Somma McGivney, Pharm.D., FCCP, FAPhA, Associate Dean for Community Partnerships, Professor of Pharmacy & Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh

12:15 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Networking Lunch

Vista Verde Gardens

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

PharmAlliance: Reflections on a Global Partnership, Leadership and Local Impact

Rio Mar Salon 5

This case study will explore one model for a global partnership between three schools of pharmacy and the impact this partnership has had on collaborating institutions from a leadership perspective. This presentation will not only focus on the successes but also the challenges faced in this 5-year partnership. Finally, this session will challenge participants to apply lessons learned to postulate the benefits and feasibility of expanding global engagement programs at their home institutions.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Introduce a model for a strategic, international partnership between three leading schools of pharmacy
  2. Explore the impact this partnership had on individual institutions and the global landscape within each
  3. Reflect upon challenges of international partnership and project collaboration
  4. Explore reproducibility and improvement of such a partnership to fit the needs of interested institutions

Arthur Christopoulos, Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, Professor, Analytical Pharmacology, Monash University; Marian Costelloe, General Manager, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University—Parkville Campus; Angela Kashuba, Pharm.D., DABCP, FCP, John & Deborah McNeill, Jr. Distinguished Professor, Director UNC CFAR Clinical Pharmacology and Analytical Chemistry Core, Adjunct Professor, Infectious Diseases, Chair, DPET, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Michael Munday, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutical Biochemistry, University College London; David R. Steeb, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Clinical Assistant Professor, Director of Global Engagement, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Caroline Welles, Pharm.D., BCPS, Fellow, PharmAlliance

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Promoting Faculty Wellness and Professional Fulfillment

Rio Mar Salon 1–4

Dedicated faculty represent the most important and valuable resource in academic pharmacy, making faculty retention a vital concern to department chairs. Lack of fulfillment and inadequate professional advancement are associated with higher rates of turnover, particularly for female faculty. In this session, Lisa Merlo, Ph.D., MPE, will discuss specific strategies for increasing professional fulfillment while improving engagement and professional advancement among pharmacy faculty. Drawing on the Stanford Model as the foundation of her presentation, Dr. Merlo will discuss how and why many well-intended efforts to prevent “burnout” and promote “wellness” among faculty in academic health centers are destined to fail. In contrast, she will describe evidence-based strategies to inspire faculty to pursue professional fulfillment by focusing on what brings meaning to their work and, by extension, to their lives. Specific interventions that chairs can make to improve fulfillment and professional advancement among female faculty will be discussed, with recommendations to facilitate implementation in departments and colleges of pharmacy.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain the Stanford model of professional fulfillment.
  2. List common mistakes in faculty wellness initiatives.
  3. Describe an example intervention to promote wellness and professional fulfillment for women faculty.

Lisa J. Merlo, Ph.D., M.P.E., Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Director of Wellness Programs, College of Medicine, University of Florida

2:45 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Networking and Beverage Break

Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Council of Faculties Forum

Rio Mar Salon 1–4

All members of the Council of Faculties are invited to participate in discussions on current and future council priorities.

Chair: Craig D. Cox, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, Vice Chair, Experiential Programs and Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Council of Deans Business Meeting

Rio Mar Salon 5

All members of the Council of Deans are invited to receive updates and participate in discussions regarding current and future council priorities.

Chair: Russell B. Melchert, Ph.D., R.Ph., Dean and Professor, Division of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Tuesday

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Schools and Colleges Partnering to Support Community Pharmacy Practice Transformation: Updates from the ACT Pharmacy Collaborative

Caribbean Ballroom

Nationwide, community pharmacy practice is rapidly changing and adapting to healthcare needs and business pressures. Schools and colleges have an impactful role in training, advocating, researching and sharing successful patient care implementation strategies. The ACT (Academia-CPESN Transformation) Pharmacy Collaborative has been formed to unite and mobilize schools/colleges of pharmacy with community pharmacy clinically integrated networks nationwide to amplify the impact pharmacists and students make in communities through their care. Join us in this session to learn about highlighted examples of successful academic-CPESN partnerships, hear the results of the national day of service activities, student CPESN Scholar Awards, and participate in active discussion and planning with colleagues.

TBD (TBD)

Jennifer L. Bacci, Pharm.D., MPH, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Washington; Tripp Logan, Pharm.D., Chief Operating Officer, Enhanced Service Pharmacy Alliance (ESPhA), Vice President, Logan & Seiler, Inc.; Melissa Somma McGivney, Pharm.D., FCCP, FAPhA, Associate Dean for Community Partnerships, Professor of Pharmacy & Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh; Troy Trygstad, Pharm.D., MBA, Ph.D., Executive Director, Community Pharmacy Enhanced Services Network (CPESN) USA

10:00 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Networking and Beverage Break

Rio Mar Ballroom Foyer

10:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Legal Issues in the Academy: Are You Prepared?

Caribbean Ballroom

This session will provide an overview of some key legal issues frequently faced by academic pharmacy administrators. Strategies for addressing issues and resolution will also be reviewed. An interactive law session with application-based cases will be delivered by content experts. Faculty currently or considering administrative positions are encouraged to attend. This session is designed to be appropriate for all disciplines and experience.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Introduce and discuss current legal issues in higher education.
  2. Evaluate, discuss and assess legal issues facing higher education administrators in colleges/schools of pharmacy.
  3. Formulate strategies for continued legal preparedness of academic administrators in schools of pharmacy.

Application-based (0581-0000-20-013-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

David D. Allen, R.Ph., Ph.D., FASHP, FNAP, FAPhA, Dean and Professor, Executive Director, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi; Diane B. Ginsburg, Ph.D., M.S., R.Ph., FASHP, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs and Clinical Professor, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin; Richard Kasmer, Pharm.D., JD, Dean, Vice President, and Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Professor of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Northeast Ohio Medical University; Jonathan Wolfson, JD, Principal, The Great Debate

Noon–5:00 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG Program

Parrot

The Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG program is designed for administrative and financial officers, as well as other AACP participants interested in key administrative, financial and leadership issues that influence the operations of colleges of pharmacy. This half-day program will provide participants the opportunity to engage in meaningful discussions regarding the Financial and Salary Surveys, leadership support to Deans, other areas of responsibility within the Finance and Administration role, as well as hot topics in the world of finance and operations.

Noon–1:00 p.m.

AFO SIG Program Lunch and Rapid Fire/Business Items

Parrot

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Collecting Data for Leadership Decision Making–AACP Salary Survey: Is It Time for a Change?

Parrot

Over the years, the AFO-SIG has worked with AACP to develop a robust Salary Survey. The salary survey is an essential tool in making human resource and administrative decisions. To ensure the salary survey remains a valuable data analytics tool for schools of pharmacy, there is a need to continue to review the salary survey methodology and ensure appropriate information is collected. This program will engage the audience on the purpose of the tool and solicit input on future improvements. The program is intended for the AFO-SIG, Assessment SIG and Deans Council.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Understand the AACP Salary Survey methodology
  2. Learn how other schools of pharmacy use the salary survey
  3. Identify opportunities to improve the salary survey

(Chair and Moderator) Dale E. Rush, M.P.A., University of Illinois at Chicago; (Immediate Past Chair) Robert E. Lamb, MBA, Mercer University; (Chair Elect) Mark B. Goggin, MBA, Western University of Health Sciences

2:00 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Beverage Break and Networking

Parrot

2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Senior Leadership Collaboration to Support the Dean

Parrot

Deans rely on their leadership teams to support routine activities and special initiatives. This includes the financial and administrative associate deans, as well as other senior staff. At Maryland, a team of three senior staff (assistant deans) from different disciplines have developed a unique collaborative relationship to optimally meet the dean’s needs related to conveying strategic information to a variety of audiences from students and faculty to external stakeholders such as state agencies, legislators and alumni. The team is comprised of expertise in project management, assessment and communications, and works together to create clear and concise communications from the dean. The varied backgrounds of the senior staff aid in the creation of these communications—one focuses on the data, one focuses on policy, and one focuses on the “words.” This unique arrangement is beneficial to have in place, as each person draws on their own expertise to assist other team members with a given assignment. It is essential that senior staff who support the dean stay in regular communication regarding individual projects and requests from the dean in order to provide additional expertise to round out the responses and to avoid duplication of efforts.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe senior staff roles and leadership team composition at colleges/schools of pharmacy
  2. Describe the various expertise needed in an effective senior leadership team

(Speaker) Lisa Lebovitz, JD, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Deborah A. DeWitt, JD, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Rebecca J. Ceraul, B.A., University of Maryland

3:15 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Break

Parrot

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Collecting Data for Leadership Decision Making- AACP Financial Survey: What Does the Future Hold for Us?

Parrot

A recent message from ACPE stating the AACP financial survey would be sun-setting created immediate inquiries from pharmacy schools across the nation. Questions were raised as to whether the financial survey was relevant, was needed, or whether this was an opportunity to review and enhance the survey going forward. This program is intended to look at the current ACPE accreditation standards, review what is required, and discuss the future of the AACP Financial Survey. The program is geared towards AFO-SIG, Assessment-SIG, and the Deans Council.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Understand the ACPE accreditation standards focused on financial information
  2. Discuss different survey models that could be used to collect financial information
  3. Learn about different financial models and how different survey models could be used

(Chair and Moderator) Dale E. Rush, M.P.A., University of Illinois at Chicago; (Immediate Past Chair) Robert E. Lamb, MBA, Mercer University; (Chair Elect) Mark B. Goggin, MBA, Western University of Health Sciences

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Executive Committee Meeting

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